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I have some questions to ask?

what would i have to be prepared for to become a veterinarian.

what kind of classes would i have to take to be ready for this kind of career.

Why did you want to become a veterinarian, was it the first thing you wanted to do for a career.

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Delia’s Answer

I agree with Isabel's advice.... to a degree. Gaining a degree in veterinary medicine has the potential of being the best career choice imaginable!! I mean, your getting paid to love on furry babies! It's hard to beat puppy breath & kitty biscuits!!
BUT I'd like to mention the cons of Veterinary Medicine to keep in mind when choosing a profession. I wish I'd done my research decades ago. Ok. Like Isabel mentioned, it is a good idea to shadow a vet to get an idea of what to expect; however the setting for practice plays a big factor in everything DVM. Private practice day to day affairs vary greatly than in an Emergency/Critical Care. Emergency/ Critical Care daily routines don't hold a candle to specialty/referral clinics. So what I'm saying is, check out & shadow DVMs in ALL the clinics/ hospitals/ specially clinics/ universities in your area to get a better idea of what to expect.
Also. A veterinarian is a doctor & go to school & take board certified tests for accreditation just like a human doctor...... JUST NOT PAID AS WELL. A DVM is a physician, surgeon, dentist, radiologist, microbiologist, oncologist.....I could go on & on....... for more than 1 kind of animal....like cows, horses, chickens, dogs, cats, snakes, mice...etc. Human doctors treat only 1 kind of animal..... humans. But because our patients aren't people... the pay is a drastic comparison.
I'll end by saying this. Be 100% on your priorities of what you'd want your life to be like after college. IF MONEY (FUTURE FINANCIAL STABILITY) PLAYS ANY ROLE IN DETERMINING YOUR CAREER CHOICE.... I'D LOOK INTO ANOTHER PROFESSION.
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Isabel’s Answer

Hi Kathlyn, you chose a great and rewarding career. For an education path as a veterinarian, you can chose any major as an undergrad however you must have the required courses to veterinary school. Please check out the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges https://www.aavmc.org/. It's a great source of information, this is directly for the AAVMC. If possible, check precollege summer enrichment programs in your area in Pre-Vet.

How to Prepare in High School
Gain a solid background in math and science.
Take part in extracurricular activities (athletics, school clubs, FFA, etc)
Study and maintain a high GPA and high SAT/ACT scores.
Acquire as much experience with pets as possible. Consider volunteering at your local humane society or with a local veterinarian.

How to Prepare as a College Undergraduate
Take a pre-vet or comparable curriculum, that is, one that includes math and several science courses such as biology and chemistry.
Maintain a high GPA
Gain as much broad exposure to veterinary medicine as possible. Consider job shadowing with veterinarians, scientists, working on a farm or volunteering at an animal shelter.
Join a Pre-Vet club.

Finally, this is a list of Pre-Vet Colleges in California hopefully in your area. You qualify for in state tuition and help you reduce costs. Contact them for their financial aid options.Colleges With Pre Vet Programs In California
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Julio’s Answer

Hey Kathlyn! I know the good and the bad about being and becoming a veterinarian, so I'm going to share those with you, and I hope it helps you make a decision. It may not be what you want to hear, but helping you make the right decision and informing you about the veterinary field with things you may not know now will help you in the long run.

So, let's start off with the good:
Becoming a veterinarian is very fulfilling and although it is hard work, it is rewarding, especially if you have a deep love for animals!
The pay, opportunities around the country, and the veterinarian programs are all very fun and top tier, which means you'll get a great education in the 4 years of vet school.
Ability to become an entrepreneur by opening your own practice and having the freedom to live almost anywhere in the country since vets are needed everywhere in the country (Rural, Urban, and Suburban).


The "bad":
Vet schools in the US are far and few, and very competitive.
You will have school debt for the majority of your life, since vet school debt is usually in the $200K-$400K range without scholarships.
The income to debt ratio is much lower compared to medical (human) doctors.
A harsh, but brutally honest fact is the depression and effects of that depression that happen in the veterinary field. Look up the stats and see for yourself.
You must be mentally prepared for 8-10 years of school after high school. 4 of undergraduate, 4 of vet school, and 1-2 if you want to specialize in other fields such as exotic or farm animals.
Just like many doctors and nurses who are fresh out of school, you may have to start your career off in a not so favorable position. A common one is working at an animal shelter, where a good chunk of your day is spent spaying, neutering, and euthanizing animals.

I will say, although I can think of more cons than pros, the pros have more meaning behind them. If you are ready to help families and their animals, have fun along the way of becoming a vet, and are confident about become a veterinarian, then go for it!

My advice to you now is to volunteer or get a job at animal shelters or veterinary clinics/hospitals. A good position to look for is Vet Tech if you want to get a real glimpse of what it is like to be a veterinarian since you will be working closely alongside actual veterinarians.

Good Luck!
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Sefa’s Answer

Hey Kathlyn, I don't know if you can take any specific classes to prepare you for becoming a veterinarian, but I have worked with a lot of veterinarians, so I have an idea as to what a day in their lives looks like.

First and foremost, you need to have an undying love for animals. One who does not like animals cannot do this job. You need to be very patient, for you will often be performing on scared animals who have little idea what's going on and trying to break free from your grasp. Last but not least, know that you will be saving many lives, but you will also be losing some, and innocent, cute animals at that. If you can find it in yourself to deal with that kind of loss, if you can accept it within the circle of life, go for it. In my country you need to go to a 4-year college and do an internship, and I believe it should be similar in your country as well.
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