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How to effectively manage transition to computing?

Hi,
As a student of a conversion master's degree in Computing, I am struggling to understand how to plan the transition in my career efficiently. I would appreciate advise in the topic. I studied Business for my bachelor's degree and have two years of work experience in global marketing, now aiming to transition to software engineering with end-goal of becoming a product manager. What are the best steps to take now to ensure a smooth career transition?

Thank you!
#Fall22

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Jessica’s Answer

Hi!

I agree that you'll want to close the technical gaps you have in any way. How you do so, depends on what type of computing you want to get into as there are many subsets of the field. Once you narrow it down, look at certifications, boot camps or even volunteering your time to small companies and non-profits to help get the hands-on experience!
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Mickael’s Answer

Hi Olivia,

This is a hard question because I think the answer is "it depends on the company that will hire you".

I believe one thing you are going to miss is the experience that other had in their career that you won't. So you will need to catch up, somewhat, this gap.
Reading about common software mistakes, practicing on your own by coding your own projects will help. Also, after this, your expectations as your first job as a software developer, before becoming a manager should not be as high as expecting an offer from business since you will be considered all new.

I am not sure how I can help more, but if you do have specific follow up questions, please do not hesitate to ask.
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Peter’s Answer

it is interesting challenges you have, however, the path to get there is really depends on what your timelines. If you only thinking of marketing side of the product, then understand the technical aspect and competitions would be good enough. However, if you think you want to understand the nuts and bolts of the product in order to sell it, then it will take longer. I have met many product managers that do not understand their products in depth but they understand their product position and their strength (both technical and cost), so they are ok. Once in a while, I have someone who knows their product inside and out and their position, then they usually get more favor impression from me.
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