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Sports Broadcasting / Sports Media

What does the typical day of a sports broadcaster or someone in the sports media do?

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Amanda’s Answer

For a sports broadcaster - every day is different. Let's use an example to make it a little easier -- we'll use the example of a play-by-play broadcaster calling a CFB game. The broadcaster starts his/her work several days or even weeks before calling a game. They start doing research on players, research on the team, etc. early in the week. They talk to the producer of the game about the storylines going in to the game and also all the logistics related to the game (when they will get there, times of meetings, etc.). Typically the broadcaster will travel Thursday or early Friday AM for a Saturday CFB game. Once they get to site, they meet up with their analyst and producer to talk about any other things they should consider for this particular game. Some times they have coach's meetings on Friday where they meet with each coach of the teams they're broadcasting to learn more about the team, tendencies in certain situations, etc. This helps give the broadcasters insight into the thinking of the head coach. Come Saturday (day of game), the broadcasters get to the site around 2 hours before the game. They can walk around the field prior to the game and talk to any of the coaches/players if they want to. They get set up in their booth and typically have some pre-game hits to do with whatever studio shows are on the air. Then, the game starts and they call a game. They've got the support of a producer, spotter, statistician and of course their analyst. Once the game is over their work is done. They pack up and typically will head to the airport or back to their hotel. And then they think about whatever game is next week...and start the process all over. Hope that helps!
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Ben’s Answer

Hey Gracie! A typical day usually is starting work later in the morning/day since sports tend to be at night or on weekends. You'll spend time reaching out to contacts, pitching stories or what you want your segment to be, planning how you will execute your stories from filming, interviews, editing and presentation, and then you will present what you have done on air. The part on TV or online is a small part of the job, and the actual reporting, creativity and prep is most of it. I most enjoyed going to sports events and meeting various coaches and players to learn about them. There are various jobs too, like producing or being on the technical end. All with different tasks during the day but it is very collaborative to create a great experience for the audience.
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Barry’s Answer

Hi, Gracie!

As a feature story producer at ESPN (30 years), my days are never the same. It depends where I am in the production process. If I am not yet assigned to a story, then I am scouring sources for ideas. If I am assigned to a story, then I have to juggle multiple parts of the production arc at once - the logistics of any original shoots (procuring a reporter if necessary, photographer, travel arrangements), researching the story, if possible pre-interviewing subjects by phone or email ahead of time, searching for appropriate visual and sound elements (news reports, music) to help tell the story.
Once we obtain all the elements (interviews, visuals), then it is time to write the story. Sometimes, the reporter will do it. Other times, reporters will tweak a first draft that I write, since some reporters do not have time to cull through the raw interview transcripts from scratch.
Then, we edit. That could take 1 day or multiple days/weeks, depending on the complexity of the story.
So no day is exactly like another in my corner of the world. I hope this helps.
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abdullah’s Answer

This is what I found when browsing the internet and reading articles :


Check in at the newspaper offices and take care of administrative duties and sit in on meetings with editors, other writers, and other staff.

Arrive at the stadium and check in at the media entrance about three hours prior to game time. Proceed to the press box and set up the laptop computer and notebooks at the designated work area in the press box. (Each writer is assigned a space in the press box). Grab press clippings, visiting team media guide, media notes, and statistics packets for both home and visiting teams that were assembled by team media relations staff.

Head down to the locker rooms/clubhouses and wait with other media to talk to players as they arrive and get dressed and prepare for the game.

Listen to the manager’s daily meetings and question-and-answer sessions with the press.

Eat dinner in the press box and talk with other reporters.

The game begins…start taking notes and keeping statistics as the innings or half and quarters go by. Start writing about important highlights of the game that will eventually be pieced together to form the bulk of the story.

The game ends…head for the elevator to go down to the locker rooms/clubhouse. Hometown media go to the hometeam side and visitor media to the visitor’s side. Wait for the media relations staff to open up the club to the media and start letting them inside. Immediately race to the manager’s or coach’s office to gather quotes and comments on the game. Ask questions if needed. After listening to the coach/manager, wait by the lockers with other media and interview players who significantly contributed to the game as the players change their clothes.

Head back up to the press box and get quotes from a media relations intern that were taken from the manager and players in the other team’s locker room. Start incorporating the coach and player quotes into the story along with previously written game highlights.

Finish the article and send it to print. Most press boxes have high-speed Internet access these days, so it’s possible to wrap up the stories while on location.
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abdullah’s Answer

This is what I found when browsing the internet and reading articles :


Check in at the newspaper offices and take care of administrative duties and sit in on meetings with editors, other writers, and other staff.

Arrive at the stadium and check in at the media entrance about three hours prior to game time. Proceed to the press box and set up the laptop computer and notebooks at the designated work area in the press box. (Each writer is assigned a space in the press box). Grab press clippings, visiting team media guide, media notes, and statistics packets for both home and visiting teams that were assembled by team media relations staff.

Head down to the locker rooms/clubhouses and wait with other media to talk to players as they arrive and get dressed and prepare for the game.

Listen to the manager’s daily meetings and question-and-answer sessions with the press.

Eat dinner in the press box and talk with other reporters.

The game begins…start taking notes and keeping statistics as the innings or half and quarters go by. Start writing about important highlights of the game that will eventually be pieced together to form the bulk of the story.

The game ends…head for the elevator to go down to the locker rooms/clubhouse. Hometown media go to the hometeam side and visitor media to the visitor’s side. Wait for the media relations staff to open up the club to the media and start letting them inside. Immediately race to the manager’s or coach’s office to gather quotes and comments on the game. Ask questions if needed. After listening to the coach/manager, wait by the lockers with other media and interview players who significantly contributed to the game as the players change their clothes.

Head back up to the press box and get quotes from a media relations intern that were taken from the manager and players in the other team’s locker room. Start incorporating the coach and player quotes into the story along with previously written game highlights.

Finish the article and send it to print. Most press boxes have high-speed Internet access these days, so it’s possible to wrap up the stories while on location.
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