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Is it better to wait to obtain your DNP? Is it better to gain experience as an RN before becoming an NP?

Is it better to spend some time working as an RN after obtaining your BSN, or is getting your DNP right after ungrad just as good? Pros and cons to practical work as an RN vs finishing DNP earlier without that experience. #FALL22

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Ann’s Answer

As a long time Family Nurse Practitioner, I would definitely recommend getting your BSN and doing some bedside nursing before going on to get your DNP. I, personally, don’t know that there’s an advantage of having a MSN vs having a DNP, unless you want to work in academia but I know that’s the degrees NP’s will eventually need. I think having experience under your belt will be invaluable to you for your graduate degree, as well as in being a nurse practitioner. Eric’s answer is not correct. Getting your BSN does not make you a nurse practitioner. Getting your graduate degree as a nurse practitioner is when you become an NP. Most employers want you board certified, too (not sure one can work without being board certified).
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Raquel’s Answer

Some schools require experience as an RN before you can start school to become a nurse practitioner. While it is ultimately up to you what you want to do, getting a few years of experience is invaluable for becoming a good nurse practitioner. I know a lot of NP's who don't feel like the schooling is sufficient and that they don't know enough, and these are people with years of nursing experience. If you go straight to DNP school you have a total of 6-8 college years of schooling depending on your program. To become a medical doctor you have a minimum of 8 years of school and 4 years of residency for a total of at lest 12 years of learning. They also spend at least 4 years being supervised by a more experienced physician while in residency. NP's don't get that, once you graduate you get a little bit of training and supervision and then you're on your own. Just some food for thought.
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Jemimah’s Answer

In my opinion, it is better to obtain your BSN and work as a nurse to gain experience before going for your DNP. In the workforce, you will encounter experiences that school will not teach you. It is best to have that real-world experience first. Some schools might require you to have a nursing background before you can apply to be an NP. It is not necessary to obtain a master's in nursing if your endgame is to become a DNP.
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Eric’s Answer

Greetings dear Milan,
The great question is what do you want?? Some programs require you to
be an RN BSN first and then it’s called a Nurse Practitioner. It’s stages there
other practitioners Doctors have a
program called Physicians Assistant
or (PA). It’s a different animal from nursing. So I hope this answers your questions, or create new ones.
I also would suggest review your interest for your desired career.
If your healing call then you may just want to become a Dr. ??
You will never become (rich) being a nurse. There are battles for practice rights. Most NP’s operate under a Practicing Physician. Or work in hospital settings. But still there are autonomy issues that are still alive a lot of issues there. Just think about what you want to accomplish.
As for me in my medical journey as well as into mental health. I’m finding it depends upon your inner faith and where your spirit dwells with God.
It’s the service of healers be in-tune
with those who are in need of healing.
People can sense if it’s just a job to you or you care because it’s life you are trying to help sustain.
Just a thought
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