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What classes should I take when I do Dual Enrollment?

For my next school year, I plan on pursuing Dual enrollment and was wondering what classes I should take. The courses that I thought would be good for my future career (Cardiologist) Health Care providers/assistance, Health information management, Health Leisure physical education, Health services administration, Health sciences, anatomy and physiology, human nutrition, Nursing-Generic-undergraduates, and surgical technology studies. I was wondering what would be the absolute best classes for me to take. And as far as math and chemistry go would I need to take those classes again? Please help.

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Jennifer’s Answer

My daughters were limited in the number of dual enrollment classes they could take so check on that aspect before enrolling. English, history, communication/speech and basic math are always great ones to take. You may be able to test out of certain levels of math and it's worth it to take the test and get it on your transcript. I have three daughters with three different experiences with dual enrollment and or AP. My oldest was in a specific training program (radiology tech) and their curriculum was fixed (you take certain classes in certain semesters) so the 5 dual enrollment classes she took were out of sequence for the program and they forced her take fluff electives to maintain full time status. She felt the extra classes were a waste of time and money to be required to take. My 2nd daughter took a mixed of dual enrollment and AP. she didn't' score high enough on AP exams so she had to retake some of those classes, but they were out of sequence for the university she attended, and the university still required almost a full semester of prerequisite coursework just to be able to enroll in higher level classes. My youngest had the most successful experience. She took 12 hours of dual credits her junior and senior year and courses in the summers, did really well and was able to start college with enough credits almost as a sophomore.
Spend time with the dual enrollment counselor they probably have vast experience in what students done and are very successful in completing
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Delaina’s Answer

I think what you have considered taking is a great start. Other considerations including your basics may include behavioral science courses if you plan to interact with patients as well as something "fun" to you to allow yourself a break to digest the harder subjects. I did dual enrollment and to keep from burnout I took a dance class every semester. It was a great way of breaking up my classes so that I had time to enjoy a hobby and practice work/life balance.
Thank you comment icon You rock! This advice is very helpful. A'zaaria
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Noah’s Answer

Try taking a look at your high school graduation requirements and what is required for whatever degree you want to get. Chances are, there will be some overlap which you can use to cut down on the cost and length of your degree. Also, try to start with knocking out general education requirements first and add in 1-2 classes that fit your interest better each semester until your general eds are done. If you're really interested in saving time + money, you could research competency-based alternatives such as Sophia Learning or CLEP.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. A'zaaria
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