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Do you have any advice for me to become a Physical Therapist?

I am a senior at KIPP Renaissance High School in New Orleans, LA I'm trying to find more information on how to become a Physical Therapist. I would appreciate any information you guys can give me. Please and thank you. #PT #physical-therapy #physical-therapist

Thank you comment icon Hi Coreyneisha! I think part of your question was answered here: https://www.careervillage.org/questions/7535/what-are-challenges-that-physical-therapists-face-on-a-day-to-day-basis Abby Lupi, Admin

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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Coreyneisha,

An Insight into the Day-to-Day Life of a Physical Therapy Student

The life of a physical therapy (PT) student is intense and demanding, packed with a mix of classes, lab work, and clinical observations. The PT curriculum is designed to be both challenging and all-encompassing, covering a broad range of subjects such as anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, neuroscience, and pharmacology. Beyond the academic work, PT students are also expected to complete clinical rotations, offering them practical experience in diverse healthcare environments.

A typical day for a PT student might begin early with a lecture on anatomy or physiology, followed by a lab session where they hone their dissection or examination skills. Post lunch, they might attend a class on biomechanics or neuroscience, followed by a clinical observation where they learn from a licensed physical therapist in a real-world healthcare setting. The day usually wraps up with the student studying for an upcoming test or working on a paper for a class.

The Toughest Classes for Physical Therapy Students

Physical therapy students are presented with numerous challenging classes throughout their academic journey. Some of the most demanding ones include:

Anatomy: A cornerstone for PT students, anatomy delves into the structure and function of the human body, with a detailed study of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. This course demands extensive memorization and comprehension of intricate structures and their interrelationships.
Physiology: Physiology explores how the human body operates both at rest and during physical activity. The course covers subjects like muscle contraction, cardiovascular function, and respiration, requiring a profound understanding of how different organ systems collaborate to maintain balance in the body.
Biomechanics: This subject studies the movement of the human body and the forces that act upon it. Topics like kinematics, kinetics, and muscle mechanics are covered, requiring strong mathematical abilities and a grasp of physics principles.
Neuroscience: Neuroscience delves into the workings of the nervous system and its role in controlling movement and sensation. The course covers neural anatomy, neural physiology, and neural plasticity, demanding a solid understanding of anatomy and physiology, and the capacity to critically analyze complex neural circuits.
Pharmacology: This subject focuses on drugs and their effects on the human body, covering drug classification, drug interactions, and pharmacodynamics. This course requires robust analytical abilities and an understanding of how drugs impact different organ systems.

In summary, a day in the life of a physical therapy student is filled with demanding classes, lab sessions, and clinical observations. The toughest classes often include anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, neuroscience, and pharmacology. Success in these courses requires extensive memorization, critical thinking, mathematical abilities, and analytical skills.

Stay Blessed!
James Constantine Frangos.
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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Coreyneisha:

Thank you for your question. I'm currently going through physical therapy and boy do I appreciate my therapists. They challenge me to move past my pain. FYI, I've researched your question and hope you find the information useful.

Physical therapists help injured or ill people improve movement and manage pain. They are often an important part of preventive care, rehabilitation, and treatment for patients with chronic conditions, illnesses, or injuries.

EDUCATION
Physical therapists entering the occupation need a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. All states require physical therapists to be licensed.

Physical therapists need a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree from a program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).

DPT programs typically last 3 years. Many programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission as well as prerequisite courses, such as anatomy, biology, chemistry, physics, and physiology. Some programs admit college freshmen into 6- or 7-year programs that allow students to graduate with both a bachelor’s degree and a DPT. Most DPT programs require candidates to apply through the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS). Best of luck to you!

Sheila recommends the following next steps:

How to Become a Physical Therapist • https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physical-therapists.htm#tab-4
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Carol’s Answer

Hi Coreyneisha. While I have not recruited for Physical Therapists, I have found that the best way to find out about any job or job field is to go online and ask. I used Google. Here is some of what I found.

Physical Therapy Schools & Careers | How to Become a Physical ...

  1. https://www.learnhowtobecome.org/physical-therapist/

Steps to Becoming a Physical Therapist. Earn a Bachelor's Degree in a Health-Related Field. Complete a Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree Program. Meet Your State's Licensing Requirements. Complete a Residency (Optional) Obtain Board Certification (Optional)


Also there is the American Physical Therapy Association that gives you lots of helpful information.

http://www.apta.org


Hope this helps to get you started.

One of my best friends has been a Physical Therapist for years and loves doing the work. Feel free to reach back out.

Carol

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