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Should I go to college after graduating from high school or should I work and get some money and go to college one year later?

I'm having some economic issues and I want to attend college, but I don't have all the money to pay it. What should I do. I already applied to scholarships, but I it isn't enough.

Thank you comment icon There are a lot of colleges, that prefer their students to not work, while attending school. I think waiting until your junior or senior year, Is a great option for any college student, that's usually when you're able to get interships for companies. keshawn johnson

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Subject: Career question for you

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Christine’s Answer

Great, and responsible, question!
There are tons and tons of scholarships out there. Have you tried applying? If you want to go to college and know what you want to study then check out the checklist below and go for it if you can swing the economics to a point where you aren’t going into debt.
If you aren’t sure what you want to study then don’t force it. Get a job (ideally in the field you think you are interested in), save some money and do some exploring - then decide.
Also - consider going to community college for the first year or two. It’s MUCH more affordable and as long as you are in close contact with your advisor with a shared goal of transferring later they can make sure you take classes that won’t be a waste of time. That way your diploma/degree will say where you ended, not where you started.

Christine recommends the following next steps:

Complete FAFSA
Apply for acholarships
Talk to financial aid office at schools you applied to to see what they can offer
Thank you comment icon I'm excited to put your great advice to good use! Evan
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Racheal’s Answer

Hello,
This is such a great question because many of us whom have gone through higher education path have often asked ourselves this question.
I believe that if you are ready to explore the world in which you need to obtain financial income to take care of yourself, then find work full time and nit focus on school.
If you are sure you are ready to continue your education then go to college.
Both require uou to be more responsible, network, and increase your work ethic. Both will be available no matter which you choose to do first.
As for myself I worked two jobs and completed my education at all levels. I believe that if you don't want to do higher education later, attend school now to get it out the way. If you need money to pay for schooling and have not earned scholarship, then so what needs to be done so you can go to school without dealing with financial stress.

Hope this helps!!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. Evan
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Noe’s Answer

You can do both, look for a job that accommodates your school schedule, start with a few classes so you don't get overwhelmed. Take baby steps towards your new career, it's better to start sooner than later.
Thank you comment icon Thanks, can't wait to put this advice into action! Evan
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Andrew’s Answer

You have a lot of great options, so don't stress. There are a lot of job openings that you can do today with your well-deserved High School diploma. One option that might work for you is to select from these opportunities and evaluate which of them offers tuition reimbursement benefits. For example, I work at AT&T and we currently offer $8,000/year up to $25,000 total of tuition assistance. If you worked at one of our retail stores, call centers, or as a technician visiting customer home - you could start taking classes after 6 months and get these tuition benefits to get your degree. Many companies offer similar programs, and you should ask about these during your job interviews. The other benefit is you get work experience while learning about your chosen learning program. You could be ahead of the game and accrue seniority and real-world experience. You could ask the school to waive or let you test out of some classes based on your work experience.

I joined the military and used the GI Bill to pay for college. Others take out loans and pay for school later. Some take on-line only programs. Lots of options to explore. Pick the one you feel most confident in pursuing. No worries if you try and it does not work out. You can always try again with a different route. Your career journey is a marathon, not a sprint. You have plenty of time to make adjustments - just don't go too far off the trail and never get to your destination.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice, Andrew. Evan
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Vamshee’s Answer

Good Advice given by others already.

Following link provides the link for many academic scholarships and merit scholarship opportunities which you can consider.

https://www.scholarships.com/financial-aid/college-scholarships/scholarships-by-type/academic-scholarships-and-merit-scholarships/

1)Complete FAFSA and so you know how much waiver or loan you can obtain.
2) Work in summer to earn some money to fund the college
3) Find jobs that are flexible, where you can work on weekends or holidays
4) Working in restaurants may get you good money with tips (One of my colleague's son does make good money this way)
5) Going to community college to get some credits and transfer the credits to College is a good option as well
6)Tutoring is a good job to make some money and also be in touch with studies if you take a break for some time or not.
7) If you end up taking break as a last resort, take some online courses or read some course study so you can be in touch with studies.

Hope this helps! Wish you all good luck in your future endeavors!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing your perspective. Evan
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Gabby’s Answer

Hello,

If you have applied to scholarships and find you are still short on the money, then perhaps try to find a part-time gig that allows you to work with a school schedule in mind. Depending on what you are looking for, that are also multiple remote opportunities that might provide you with the extra school funding and flexibility needed to both attend college and pay for it.

I'd highly recommend looking for remote jobs such as customer service representative, entry-level IT support, and data entry.

I see you are located in San Francisco, check out the San Francisco Public Library System for part-time jobs (if that is of interest to you). Your local hospital might also have nondegree, entry-level positions that offer schedule flexibility.

Babysitting/nanny jobs, transcript writing, and tutoring are also good jobs to do that offer schedule flexibility.

Hope this helps and good luck on your journey!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Evan
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Cristina’s Answer

i personally went to college as soon as i graduated High School. I see you are in California, there are many Cal grants that you can apply for to help out economically with your school. I worked full time and went to school full time as well. It does get challenging but its not impossible. I feel that if you don't start college right away, you get used to working and it makes it harder to go back.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Evan
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david’s Answer

Hi, Maryuti,
It depends a lot on how much money you need. One option, which has serious merit, is to join the military in a chosen field, receive a significant sign-in bonus, save money aside while on active duty and pursue online or local college courses during that period. There are many military positions that do not include combat, if that is a concern. Another option is to attend part-time. My recommendation, based on my own experiences at your age, is to keep the momentum going forward. Once you stop for a year, you could easily find that you are experiencing ongoing expenses, such as transportation, clothing, food, etc., and at the end of a year, you're still short of funds. The further you remove yourself from academia, the harder it is to return. Just my two cents on this. I admire that you're seriously looking at options, and I wish you the best.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Evan
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Garnet’s Answer

I decided to go to the military after high school and that is how I acquired the money to go to college and it was the best decision I made.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Evan
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Archie’s Answer

I'd recommend diving right in. I took some time off in between, and practically speaking.. it just delays you on your path. I my time off I went to the military, traveled, lived in a bunch of places and also save money because I though I'd need more than the military of FASA could offer. However, if I had to it all again, I'd have started college at the end of the summer after high school. That way you're still in the rhythm of learning, and you can find the right course early. The school will help with financial needs, and you can schedule in a part time that won't interfere with studies. All that said, I would just dive in.
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Michael’s Answer

As a disability resource coordinator at the local Department of Labor, I would like to suggest that you consider seeking support from the department to take advantage of workforce development and funding from the federal government. The department offers a range of programs designed to encourage job development in on-demand occupations, and these programs can help you achieve your career goals without having to take on the burden of paying for college on your own.

You may also want to explore other options besides traditional college education, such as pursuing vocational training or certification programs. Many local career centers offer funding for individuals to undergo training in fields such as plumbing, HVAC, and commercial driving (including obtaining your CDL license), which can lead to well-paying careers with excellent growth opportunities.

In addition to seeking out support from the Department of Labor, I would also encourage you to consider reaching out to your academic institution's disability resource center. They can provide support for students with a range of disabilities, both visible and invisible, and can help ensure that you have the accommodations you need to succeed in your studies.

Ultimately, the decision of whether to attend college immediately after high school or to work for a year and save up money is a personal one. However, by exploring all of your options and taking advantage of the resources available to you, you can make an informed decision that sets you on the path to a successful and fulfilling career.
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Terresa’s Answer

I hated school because I struggled with math and science. However in my late 20's I decided I wanted to give college a try and of course by that time I was mother to two little boys. I absolutely loved college it was a whole different experience than high school. I decided it was because I chose to go instead of mandatory. I took it seriously because I was paying for the education. I thoroughly enjoyed the experience but it was harder because I had waited so long and the skills I had learned in high school not having been used where outdated. I also had to work a full time job and care for my sons. It was very difficult to manage all of that and more than once I wished I had just went straight out of high school and put it all behind me before I had started a life. I am going to say that college is fun and you will enjoy it so go now and enjoy your life after you secure your future.
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Jeff’s Answer

Hi Maryuri,

I would plan to tackle both college and a part-time job at the same time.

I would recommend finding a community college program for your first 2 years of college. Typically, costs for community college classes are low, and these include general education classes. No need to spend big dollars for college Algebra. Save the money for bigger, more specialized classes down the road. Just make sure that your classes are transferable to a college where you can earn your Bachelor's degree.

You can work while you are taking these classes. Part-time jobs often provide the most flexibility around your class schedule. You may also want to explore a part-time job that helps to pay for college (e.g., Starbucks and others offer tuition assistance).

Lastly, give yourself some time. You don't have to complete a Bachelor's degree in 4 years. Many schools offer extended periods (up to 7 years) to complete your degree. You can continue to earn money and valuable experience in the workplace, while you move closer to earning your degree.

Good Luck!
Jeff
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Moses’s Answer

If you have explored various options for scholarships, taking a gap year may be helpful if you use your time to better yourself. For example actively seek opportunities to learn through different jobs to acquire work experience or research more into what you are passionate about. From this you can find different ways to pursue what you want to do if you are on the fence about continuing your studies or working.
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Heidi’s Answer

I took two years off between high school and college. It wasn't for financial reasons but I still advocate for this option because it gives you time to grow up a little before planning out your college-to-career path.

Another possible advantage of working for a while before college is it give you a year to file your own taxes with the IRS instead of being one of your parents' dependents, and therefore qualify you for more financial aid when you fill out the FAFSA again later.

Paying for college is hard! You are not at all alone in this struggle.
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