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Questions about Automotive Service Technicians & Mechanics?


1 What does a typical day look like for a mechanic?

2 As a mechanic, in what circumstances will I need to provide my own tools and when will the dealership provide me with the tools?

3 If I get hurt working as a mechanic, who would I need to contact and what is the procedure I would need to follow?

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Soumya’s Answer

Typical Day for a Mechanic: I have worked/am familiar with mechanics and technicians as an engineer. In my observation, the day starts with the maintenance of the shop, followed by going through the list of tasks/jobs in hand, as mandated by the supervisor.

As a mechanic, in what circumstances will I need to provide my own tools and when will the dealership provide me with the tools? In some dealerships, tools would be provided to you because they are specific to the tasks in hand (e.g., specialty cars).

Before signing up for the job of a mechanic, please ensure that you have to read the employment/workplace safety rules and regulations. I would typically communicate with the shop supervisor first and then HR, if mandated.
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Eric’s Answer

Fredy, you received some good insight from Laurie whose husband is a mechanic. I have a son that is starting an AutoTech program at our local community college. His program requires him to buy about $6000 worth of tools as part of his first semester tuition. He will use those tools throughout his program and be able to use those as a mechanic once he graduates. If you are considering going through such a program then I suggest researching to see if tools will be provided as part of the tuition.
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Larry’s Answer

Fredy - speaking strictly as a consumer who needs this kind of service, if you have the aptitude and interest in this business then GO FOR IT! You will always be able to find employment, you will be challenged, every day will be something new. DO IT!
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Laurie’s Answer

I am not a mechanic, but my husband has been one for 30+ years.
A typical day would be coming into work, checking your work orders, checking to see if the parts you ordered have come in, maybe contacting customers, and then of course, completing the work orders. This can look a bit different if you are working in a retail/dealership shop, or for a private trucking company, or even a municipality or a school district.

Tools will completely depend on what type of shop you work in, but typically most mechanics provide their own tools. In my husband's shop, if a tool he purchased broke while on the clock, the shop would pay for a replacement. Many shops provide basic tools and materials, but specialty tools will be purchased by the mechanic.

Your employer will have a set of procedures in place for employees who get hurt on the job. In many cases, there will be a designated clinic that you will have to go to, and maybe follow up visits too. Of course, your place of work will have procedures in place for emergencies. Shops are required by the state in which they are located to follow strict safety plans to protect their workers.
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