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How do you take in very triggering information from a patient and remain calm through it all?

I would like so be a sociologist and open a foster home.

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Blanche’s Answer

Hi, Aniyah. I would add to Amr's response that the first step is to work on issues that trigger an emotional response in you during your preparation to become a therapist. This might mean entering psychotherapy yourself, which is always recommended for people who want to become therapists themselves.
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Amr’s Answer

Practice self-care: Taking care of your physical and emotional well-being is important to prevent burnout and vicarious trauma. This can include getting enough rest, engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, and participating in activities you enjoy.

Maintaining professional boundaries: Maintaining a professional demeanor and avoiding becoming too emotionally involved in your patients' stories is important. This can help you remain objective and provide the best possible care.

Focus on the patient's needs: When listening to a patient's story, focus on the patient's needs and concerns. Try to listen without judgment and provide empathetic responses that validate their experiences.

Use grounding techniques: Grounding techniques can help you stay present at the moment and avoid becoming overwhelmed by your emotions. This can include taking deep breaths, focusing on a specific object in the room, or engaging in physical movement.

Seek support: It is important to have a support network of colleagues or mentors with who you can talk about difficult cases. Consider seeking supervision or counseling if you are struggling to cope with the emotions arising from your work.
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David’s Answer

The only thing I can add is for all professions that provide direct human services, such as counseling, psychotherapy, psychiatry, clinical social work, substance abuse treatment, etc., part of your preparation before completing your degree requirements will be a closely supervised internship or many hours of supervised field experience. It's during this period of time you will have the opportunity to uncover and deal with any personal issues or unresolved feelings that might interfere with your ability to provide the best professional care.

Even after completing all degree requirements and an internship or field placement experience, if you wish to become state licensed to offer services directly to the public for a fee (private practice), more supervised postgraduate experience will be required, plus an examination regarding the laws and regulations that govern your particular area of practice.
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Nicole’s Answer

It seems you were given wonderful responses to your question. It really is about healing thyself first. I only wanted to add that sociology, the study of human social interaction/behaviors is not a field where you would learn about cognitive processing therapy, emdr, etc. Working with individuals in regards to trauma, substance use, grief and loss, etc. are more in line with behavioral fields (social work, masters level mental health professionals, psychology...). I loved sociology in school, but settled to become a psychologist, because sociology lends itself to careers in primarily reseach, human resources, teaching, etc. Btw...I do like my job. Just liked sociology more. Good luck in your journey.
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