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How is community college?

I'm a senior in high school and plan on going to community college first, how is it like in community college? what could I do inside?

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Govind’s Answer

From my experience, Community College is a great way to get started on your college career, and can also help save you money.

I started my college journey at community college first and then went to a larger university. I thought community college was a great transition from high school to college.

You can take classes that are related to areas that you think you would want to major in, and you will get credit for those at many 4-year universities.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Yili
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Paul’s Answer

The community college is very student and career oriented.

If your college is close to your residence and high school district, you will most likely see people you know from your community.

The college system is normally easier to negotiate, and the courses do not have as many students as a university. So, I believe the quality of education is better.

Things are also easier to find, from classrooms to the library, to admissions and financial aid.

I think professors are also more accessible. They keep consistent office hours and are very willing to answer questions.

There are so many activities to participate in. This includes sports, student life, clubs, student government, and on campus events.

So, the community college experience, in my opinion, was far better than a university. From navigation, to familiarity, and ease of access and quality of technical and educational programs, it was well worth attending for my academic and career development.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Yili
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Linda’s Answer

I agree that starting at a community college is a good option for a number of reasons:
*It gives you a chance to experience college life in a smaller community setting, allowing a smoother transition from high school to college
*It allows you an opportunity to take a few entry-level classes to explore different career options and gain confidence in your ability to be successful in a larger college
*You can collect insights from other students who are following a similar path - taking community college before transferring to a larger university
*This is a great way to conserve your money since almost all of the classes will be transferred to larger universities and be credited toward your 4-year degree

I started at a community college because I planned to get my bachelor's degree while I was working full time and I needed to understand what it took to be successful in college and to build my confidence. After getting an A in the courses at community college, I was ready to pursue my 4-year degree. And, ultimately I achieved my Master's degree as well, while working full time, getting financial support from my employer too!
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your encouragement! Yili
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Adrian’s Answer

Community colleges are great to easy you into a different lifestyle from the traditional high school learning method. The courses are not as overwhelming as the university ones from my experience. The biggest benefit of taking community college courses for your first two years is the significant price difference as opposed to a University.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. Yili
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Bria’s Answer

I went to Community College right after high school. Some of my professors also taught at state universities and taught the same curriculum. Community College classes are smaller, and you get more time with your professors and advisors. After finishing you obtain an Associates Degree which can help you in the job market of your field of study. You have the skills while you continue to obtain a bachelor’s degree or higher if you choose. My college always had job fairs and training opportunities. They had a partnership with IBM, so computer science student gained access to some training and had employment opportunities, which thankfully I was able to take advantage of.
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Laura’s Answer

I agree with all the advice given so far! I have 6 kids and 2 of them started in community college before moving to a 4 year university. My experience with this is the following:
1) They made better grades than my kids that went straight to university - less distractions - then when they went to a 4 -year university to finish they had a 4.0 GPA which gave them lots of options
2) They had a harder time with their social life and making friends - most if not all of their friends had left to go to college vs. my kids who were living at home - so it was more of an effort
3) The money they saved was awesome! Even though we'd saved to send them to college, they were able to do interesting things in their last 2 years of university like study abroad and travel
4) It required a LOT more time management and perseverance - the biggest downside of going to community college is that the majority of people don't finish their degree. They get side tracked by working full time, getting bored, losing perspective. It is important to have a cheerleader on your side - like your parents or a friend who's attending with you or a mentor - someone to hold you accountable and to celebrate your accomplishments

All in all - if you set up your environment to win and move to the next step it's an awesome idea and a great experience
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. Yili
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Chirayu’s Answer

Community college can be a great option for students who want to pursue higher education after high school.

Here are some things you can expect from community college: Affordable tuition - Community colleges offer lower tuition rates than four-year universities, which can save you money in the long run. Flexible schedules - Community colleges often offer classes at different times of day, including evenings and weekends, which can be helpful if you need to work or have other obligations.
Smaller class sizes - Community college classes are typically smaller than those at four-year universities, which can provide more individualized attention from professors. Transfer opportunities - Many community colleges have transfer agreements with four-year universities, which can make it easier to transfer credits and continue your education.
Diverse student body - Community colleges often attract a diverse group of students, including non-traditional students, veterans, and students from different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. As for what you can do inside a community college, there are many opportunities to get involved and explore your interests.

Here are some ideas: Join a club or organization - Many community colleges have clubs and organizations for students interested in different activities, such as music, art, or sports Volunteer - Community colleges often have volunteer opportunities, such as tutoring or mentoring programs, that can help you make a difference in your community. Attend events - Community colleges often host events, such as guest speakers or cultural events, that can broaden your horizons and expose you to new ideas and perspectives. Work on campus - Many community colleges have on-campus jobs available for students, such as working in the library or bookstore. Take advantage of academic resources - Community colleges typically offer resources such as tutoring, academic advising, and career counseling to help you succeed academically and professionally. Overall, community college can be a great option for students who want to pursue higher education in a more affordable and flexible environment.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Yili
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