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What would I have to do to pursue being a detective?

I've recently noticed my interest in problem solving , mystery's. I've also noticed my decent analytical skills and thought about becoming some sort of detective or lawyer down the road when wondering what should I do with my life

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Subject: Career question for you

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Samantha’s Answer

Hi Frederick,

It’s great that you’ve identified some skills that you think make you well suited to be a detective or a lawyer. If you’re also mathematically inclined, I’d also recommend looking into something like forensic accounting (which often involves investigating crime through accounting), if you haven’t already heard about it. It’s a very interesting and often overlooked career among people with similar skill sets.

Forensic accounting aside, now that you’ve identified what you think you may want to do, I would highly recommend finding a college or university with lots of criminal justice classes, to allow you to further explore your interest. Being on a pre-law track might also be helpful, regardless of what you decide to major in, as it will allow you to have more options in the future, should you decide you do want to pursue law. I would also try to gain experience interning or volunteering to better understand if the field is right for you. It would also be helpful to talk to people who have jobs you might be interested in. Some of those people may even allow you to shadow them at work so you can really get a better sense of what having that job would be like. Ultimately, experience is the best way to confirm what career you want and it’s also a great way to build connections that may help you get jobs in the future. I would also highly recommend looking into government jobs and internships, even beyond policing. Many of the government agencies do really interesting investigative work that would likely be fascinating to someone interested in being a detective or a lawyer. Best of luck!
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Michael’s Answer

Great Answer from Luke to this question, so I will add that you might want to broaden your viewpoint on the term "Detective".
If you have an interest in the automotive industry for instance, there are people who work to find out why defects or similar issues cause
accidents to happen. Same thing in the Space and Flight based industries. Health Care has similar roles (looking for the origin of the Covid 19 Virus for instance) as does the Military.

Look for a personal fit for your personality and talents. Policing is indeed a great career goal, however policing or private investigative work
is not for everyone.

Using great "Detective" skills to make all of us safer isn't just for those of us in uniform.

Hope this helps and best wishes.
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Luke’s Answer

Becoming a detective requires a combination of education, training, and experience. Here are the general steps you would need to take to pursue a career as a detective:

Education: Typically, a high school diploma is a minimum requirement for becoming a detective, but some agencies may require a bachelor's degree in criminal justice, law enforcement, or a related field. A degree in a field like forensic science, criminology, or psychology can also be beneficial.
Gain experience: Most detectives start their careers as police officers, gaining experience in law enforcement before specializing in investigations. You may also consider working as a security guard, private investigator, or in a related field to gain experience.
Join a police department: To become a detective, you must first become a police officer. This typically involves passing a written exam, physical fitness test, and background check. After being accepted into a police academy, you will undergo rigorous training.
Gain additional training and certification: Many departments offer training programs for detectives, which cover topics like investigations, forensics, and legal procedures. You may also choose to obtain certification from a professional organization like the International Association of Chiefs of Police.
Specialize: Many detectives specialize in specific areas, such as homicide, financial crimes, or cybercrime. Specializing can help you develop expertise in a particular area and make you more marketable for promotions.
Continue your education: To advance your career and increase your chances of promotion, you may consider pursuing a master's degree in criminal justice or a related field.
Becoming a detective can be a challenging and rewarding career path. It requires dedication, hard work, and a passion for justice.
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