Skip to main content
5 answers
5
Asked 327 views

How are you going to start your college career by yourself?

Make sure to be in college by yourself one day

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

5 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Melchizedek,

Embarking on your college journey alone can be a thrilling yet daunting experience. It demands meticulous planning, self-drive, and a robust sense of self-reliance. Here are some practical steps to help you navigate your solo college journey:

1. Choose the right college: Start by exploring various colleges and universities that match your academic and career aspirations. Evaluate aspects like location, size, available programs, campus life, affordability, and housing. Compile a list of potential colleges that fit your criteria and refine it based on your preferences.

2. Grasp the application process: Get to know the application requirements and deadlines for each college on your list. This might involve submitting standardized test scores (like the SAT or ACT), writing essays, securing letters of recommendation, and filling out the application form. Develop a timeline to ensure you complete all necessary steps promptly.

3. Get ready for standardized tests: If the colleges you're applying to require it, allocate time to prepare for standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT. Use study resources like practice tests, review books, online courses, or tutoring services to boost your scores. Taking these tests seriously can increase your admission chances and might even earn you scholarships.

4. Build a strong academic profile: During your high school years, strive to maintain a high GPA and take rigorous courses that showcase your academic prowess. Engage in extracurricular activities that reflect your interests and demonstrate leadership. Participate in community service or volunteer work to show your dedication to making a positive difference.

5. Seek advice from counselors and mentors: Connect with your high school guidance counselor or trusted mentors for advice and support during the college application process. They can guide you through the various requirements, offer insights into different colleges, and provide feedback on your application materials.

6. Write a compelling personal statement: The personal statement allows you to highlight your unique qualities, experiences, and goals. Reflect on your personal journey, key events, and how they've shaped your aspirations. Craft a well-written essay that underscores your strengths, passions, and reasons for pursuing higher education.

7. Apply for financial aid and scholarships: College can be costly, so it's crucial to explore financial aid options. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to check your eligibility for federal grants, loans, and work-study programs. Also, research and apply for scholarships from colleges, private organizations, or community foundations to help cover tuition costs.

8. Get ready for college life: Once you've been accepted into a college, familiarize yourself with the campus resources and support services. These might include academic advising, career counseling, tutoring centers, health services, and extracurricular clubs. Attend orientation programs to get to know the campus community and your peers.

9. Hone time management skills: College life demands effective time management to balance academic duties with social activities and personal commitments. Create a schedule or use digital tools to prioritize tasks, set goals, and allocate time for studying, classes, extracurricular activities, and self-care.

10. Embrace independence and ask for help when needed: Starting college alone means taking charge of your own success. Embrace this independence, but remember that it's okay to ask for help. Reach out to professors, academic advisors, or counseling services if you face academic or personal challenges.

Embarking on your college journey alone can be a transformative experience that fosters intellectual, social, and personal growth. By following these steps and staying proactive, you're setting yourself up for a successful college career.

Top 3 Authoritative Reference Publications/Domain Names:

1. The College Board (www.collegeboard.org)
2. U.S. News & World Report - Education Section (www.usnews.com/education)
3. Peterson's (www.petersons.com)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Christopher’s Answer

This is a multi-part question, and I understand that you may not have had support while going to college. Don't worry, many of us have been in the same boat and figured it out on our own. Here's a guide to help you navigate college independently:

1. Secure a simple full-time job to cover your expenses.
Look for a straightforward full-time job that requires no more than 40 hours per week and can cover your bills with some extra to spare. Consider positions like warehouse worker, waiter/waitress, or night shift at a gas station. These jobs don't require much brainpower, allowing you to focus on school during your day.

2. Find affordable housing close to work and school.
Search for an apartment near your workplace and the local community college. It doesn't have to be extremely close, but avoid being an hour away from either. Opt for a budget-friendly apartment or rent a room if possible. The more you save, the more you'll have for future semesters and books. Socializing might have to take a backseat until you finish college, but it's worth it for your future self.

3. Apply for Federal Student Aid.
Federal Student Aid is free and designed to help students like you. Visit https://studentaid.gov/h/apply-for-aid/fafsa and apply until you get it right. It's free money that doesn't need to be paid back. Once your income exceeds a certain threshold, you'll no longer qualify, but for now, it's a great resource.

4. Enroll in evening/weekend classes at a local Community College using FAFSA.
Use the FAFSA money to sign up for courses at your local Community College. Start with a part-time schedule for your first semester to ensure you can manage work and school. If you need more funds, explore other grants and apply for as many as possible. Try to avoid student loans and rely on grants and financial aid instead. More information can be found at https://studentaid.gov/understand-aid/types.

5. Beyond Community College
If you successfully complete a 2-year degree at a community college, congratulations! You can either enter the workforce or continue your education at a university. Universities are more expensive and time-consuming, so consider applying for grants, working part-time, or carefully weighing the option of student loans. Only consider loans for degrees that promise a fulfilling career, like marine biology or similar fields. Ultimately, the choice is yours.

Remember, you're not alone. Many others have faced similar challenges and are willing to share their tips and tricks. We all love an underdog story and want to see you succeed against all odds. So, go out there and achieve greatness. We're rooting for you.

Christopher recommends the following next steps:

1. Find a simple full time job that can pay your bills.
2. Find suitable housing that you can afford.
3. Sign up for Federal Student Aid.
4. Sign up at your local Community College evening/weekend classes, paying with FAFSA.
5. Beyond Community College
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. Melchizedek
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tony’s Answer

Dear Melchizedek,

Getting started doesn't have to be expensive. There's a wealth of low-cost options available to you.

If you're unsure about which major to pursue, consider reading books like "What Color is Your Parachute?" or try taking the Myers-Briggs Personality Test (you can find one here: https://mypersonality.net/). San Francisco boasts numerous libraries where you can freely access a variety of college books. In fact, you're welcome to walk into almost any college library and read their books at no cost!

Once you've identified the majors that align with your personality, you can start planning your educational journey. Remember, a traditional 4-year college isn't the only option. For instance, you can earn certain degrees online, like at the University of the People (https://www.uopeople.edu/).

Tony recommends the following next steps:

Take Myers-Briggs Personality Test
Find a library near you
Review the degrees available from University of the People
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Tony! Melchizedek
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tim’s Answer

Hi, Young HS graduates having been going off to college forever. Some fly solo chasing their passion, some go to where mom and dad went, some work in factory for year to earn their own way, some go with many friends attending others go where there friends aren’t, . . . HS face one of the most critical decisions in their life at graduation. “What the heck do I do now?” My advice be bold, follow your dreams and passion, use your resources and be prepared for change. Consider taking a year to work, figure out what you want to do or take general studies first couple years to relieve any pressure. #1 have fun, #2 be smart, cautious #3 enjoy some independence Tim
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Amy’s Answer

Not sure exactly what you are asking. If you mean you won't know anyone, you will soon enough! Colleges have actively/group sign ups. Dorms will have events. You will find all sorts of people to meet.
For advice on campus you will have an advisor. There will be most likely a campus center where there maybe student offices for support. As well as counseling services

If you are looking for, how to apply,start with guidance counselor at you your school. Parents maybe able to help. Or maybe a friend's parents who have been through the process.

I am a big fan of community colleges. They can be great support. I recommend to many, start out at a community college. Smaller. Less expensive. More individual assistance. Starting at community college cam help you feel more confident to go on to a larger university. You will have a better idea of where to go as well as what you want to do.

Amy recommends the following next steps:

Guidance counselor
Parents
Community college counselors
0