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What is the most interesting career in psychology?

I'm a senior in high school. I've considered pursuing a major in Psychology, but am still unsure if I should continue with this major. #psychology #sociology #social-psychology #masters-in-pyschology


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Claire’s Answer

I majored in Psychology with a Sociology minor. There are many different types of careers that you could go into with a Psychology degree. It all depends on what you are interested in. You could go into some type of counseling where you provide guidance to people in need. I was initially thinking of going into School Psychology where I would work with students in a school setting. If you are interested in some form of counselling, you will need to get a Master's Degree which is when you will select your more specific route of study. You would have plenty of time throughout your undergrad before you have to make your selection You could also go into a career in social work or even working for your state's department of social services. After college, I ended up getting into a career in Human Resources with my Psychology degree. I find many parallels between my HR work and my Psychology degree!


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Jordan’s Answer

For me, the most interesting is a psychiatrist and that's for reasons of good and bad


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Austin’s Answer

I recommend trying out some introductory courses in fields you might be interested in before you pick one - there are many majors that utilize Psychology as a part of the curriculum. For example, in a Business major you may need to take a Behavioral Economics course, which focuses on the psychology involved in different economic choices. Communications or marketing majors will also require a fair amount of psychology, although these majors will focus more on how your psychology impacts your current communication rather than your history.


If you're not sure about psychology, or are also interested in other topics, talk to your academic advisor to find out if a minor in psychology is an option.


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Ted’s Answer

I obtained a B.A. in Psychology from UCLA several years ago. Unfortunately I had no career counseling whatsoever. Well into my junior year I became disenchanted with psychology for two reasons. First of all, I realized that I had very few career options in psychology that do not require an advanced degree. Secondly, I did not believe that psychology was a pure science even though it was being treated as such by some instructors. It just wasn't for me, and I did not have the time or the resources to change my major. I ended up in the business world and I struggled for quite a while until I gained more experience.


So what is my advice to you? If you are unwilling or unable to spend the time and effort required to get an advanced degree, I would not recommend psychology as your best choice, especially if you are interested in a better-than-average income. If you still wish to pursue psychology, do as much research as possible, including the use of this website. I would use the internet extensively. Google topics such as "Careers in Psychology." Contact trade associations that cater to individuals working in the field, e.g., psychology, psychiatry, marriage and family counseling, human resources, school/career counseling, etc. If you are especially interested in one or more of these career options, try to meet with people who are actually working in these areas.


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Jennifer’s Answer

I majored in sociology as an undergrad, which is very much focused on looking at populations, behaviors & social constructions. My understanding of psychology is that it's very focused on the individual, and aside from becomming a psychologist or later med school and then psychiatry, a large proportion of matriculated MSW students at my alma
mater (especially for the LICSW program) came from psychology undergrad programs. Might be something to consider looking into if it's an interest of yours. Depending on where you end up going to college, your university might have undergraduate research opportunities (UROP) that you might be able to partake in, especially as a psychology major. Becomming familiar and comfortable with SPSS and other statistics packages will become helpful for analyzing your research once there.


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