12 answers

What education and experience path leads to consulting?

12
100% of 12 Pros
Asked Viewed 710 times Translate

To #consultants : how did you get to where you are? After you are successful in a field, do you become a consultant to help others? Do you take a second job? #consulting #management-consulting

12
100% of 12 Pros

12 answers

Tasha’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Truly any background can bring you to consulting...I work with people of all backgrounds, of all majors. What brings people to consulting is the ability to kickoff ones career via a breadth of experiences. The skills learned from consulting can be applied anywhere. Typically speaking, however, people of business / finance / marketing backgrounds typically end up in consulting.

1
100% of 1 Pros

Sarah’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate
I definitely agree with the comments above! Personally speaking, I studied Mechanical Engineering & Economics during my undergraduate experience and while my current role does not directly involve me solving fluid mechanics problems, the problem solving and critical thinking skills I learned in both of my courses are definitely applicable to my consulting role. My peers come from diverse backgrounds as well; some studied business, others studied history or engineering, so there is no one clear degree which leads to consulting. As long as you are able to use your skills, work experiences and education to make an impact and solve problems, you are in good shape!



1
100% of 1 Pros

Claire’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

I think the beauty of consulting is that there are many different ways to get there. I had a more standard path, where I majored in business in college and applied for an internship with a field that interested me immensely (M&A consulting), found that I loved it, and continued along that path. The beauty is, though, you don't have to follow that path. Many of my colleagues majored in STEM fields such as engineering, interned or even started full time with engineering companies before going to consulting. You can work for a private company in finance or technology and use that experience to join a consulting firm when you need a change.

1
100% of 1 Pros

Veena’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

There's no one path in terms of education and professional experience that leads to management consulting. For example, I studied International Relations, French, and International Economics in my undergraduate and graduate studies and began a career in international development and microfinance. Later in my career, I went back to business school and pivoted into strategy consulting.

I agree that speaking to different companies will give you a sense of what they are looking for and that analytical, critical thinking, and problem solving skills are important. These skills can be cultivated regardless of your background and can be leveraged to help solve clients' problems in industries that can be quite different from where you came from.

For example, having experience in international organizations and nonprofits, I found myself as a consultant in the financial services and pharmaceutical space.

1
100% of 1 Pros

Benjamin’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Initially, I began consulting to supplement my income. Conducting primary scientific research helped develop critical thinking regarding narrow and large-scope aspects for projects. Developing a similar mindset could be valuable for a future in consulting.
0

Farrah’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Julianne,

There is no specific education or experience path that leads to a career in consulting. Last summer, I met someone who studied political science but interned in cybersecurity consulting. It's important to focus on developing core consulting skills, such as problem solving, critical thinking, leadership skills, etc. because those are evaluated during the interview process.
0

Vincent’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
For me, I came from engineering and many of my counterparts come from traditional Business (Finance, Marketing, Accounting, etc.) or Economics. With that said, there are many paths to consulting. Prior to consulting, I worked in Operations in the Food/Beverage industry where I gained experience and exposure to a variety of challenges. I came to consulting to leverage those experiences and work with a variety of clients to solve their respective business problems.
0

Kevin’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
There is a real long answer to this question but I'll just say this. What really was the game changer for me was when I realized that I didn't have to be an expert on everything and stopped trying. If you provide bandwidth by consulting for someone, you're an asset. I work with early-stage startups a lot. A lot of times they just don't have the time and resources enough to dedicate a full effort to resolve an issue so they'll look to a consultant. It's good to have an area of expertise but you can't turn down every job that doesn't fall into your comfort zone. Develop a concise way to research and an effective way to communicate your findings. That's your product. If your going to consult full time understand that it's all hustle. A reliable paycheck is great but that's a whole other gig. Part time consulting is a good way to start. It's a good skill to have just in case you want to make a change in your life. You hear about it all the time in Silicon Valley. "I'm between jobs right now so I'm just doing some consulting until I find something."
0

Susan’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I think just about any education path can lead to a career in consulting. I am a lawyer that practiced at a law firm and now I'm a consultant. We have nurses and cyber experts and psychiatrists and statisticians and anything you can imagine. The only common thread is that they have an expertise or education in a topic that they can think about in a way that solves problems for their clients.
0

Connor’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
In my opinion there are many paths to being a consultant. Less important is the path and more important is the skill set you bring. I went to a small liberal arts undergraduate college and came right to PwC. While I didn't have the business background, I did have core critical thinking, project management, leadership, and problem solving skills that helped me get going early on. Those didn't necessarily come from another job, but more some of the extra curricular a I did in college (student gov., playing a college sport). So my best advice to you is to not be so locked into what jobs show up on a resume but rather the stories you can tell and the skills you can bring to a consulting job. Good luck!
0

Marcela’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I strongly believe that consulting in one of those fields that attracts people from very different backgrounds and fields. Personally I studied political science and latin american studies with a minor in business administration. I have peers that studied accounting, finance, engineering, etc. In consulting you need to be prepared to think on your feet, be detail oriented, have strong critical thinking abilities and be personable. At the end of the day you are a consultant to solve problems for your clients.

I would encourage you to try to find out when the big consulting companies are hosting information sessions near you and attend. This is a great way to learn what specific companies want and need. #network
0

Jerel O.’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I received my undergraduate degree in Biology /Chemistry and obtained a project manager position in the public health sector. I was able to transfer the skills I acquired as a PM to Management consulting. Regardless of your educational background, focusing on developing core consulting skills can lead you to a career in consulting.
0