Skip to main content
7 answers
11
Asked 447 views

What is the likelihood that a career in Data Science will still be relevant in the next 15years?

I am a graduate student studying Business Intelligence and Cybersecurity. I recently developed an interest in Data Science. What steps do I need to take to become a successful data scientist, what is a typical day in the life of a data scientist and lastly is there a likelihood that a career in Data Science will still be relevant in the next 15years?

#spring23

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

11

7 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Nida’s Answer

Hello there! I'm absolutely thrilled to know about your enthusiasm towards Data Science. I can confidently say that choosing this career path has been one of the best decisions I have made. I genuinely enjoy the work I do. Data, in essence, is the key to unlocking the mysteries of the world. The field of Data Science is vast and filled with a multitude of career opportunities, so your choice would primarily depend on your interests.

For instance, if you're inclined towards Data Analysis, it would be beneficial to develop technical proficiency in languages like SQL, gain experience with Machine Learning tools such as R or Python, and acquire the ability to create or manipulate data visualization tools like Power BI and Tableau.

On the other hand, if Engineering and Architecture pique your interest, then mastering skills in data warehousing, data lakes, and heavy coding would be advantageous. These are just a couple of examples; the field is vast, and your daily tasks could vary significantly.

I would suggest to start your transition into this field right away. Seek out certifications, experiment with different tools, and approach interviews with practical examples. Websites like data-gov offer numerous datasets that you can download and analyze.

Although the field might gradually become more AI-centric, it's still in its early stages and is here to stay. The world will always require data interpretation. Having observed its evolution over the past decade and being a hiring manager, I can assure you that if you're genuinely interested, you should dive in and give it your best shot. The competition is only increasing as the industry matures.

Wishing you all the best on your journey!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Curt’s Answer

Very relevant question for this space. 15 years is a life time in advanced technology. The iphone is roughly 15 years old so allot can change and will change. My view is that deep background in data science, cyber, etc will continue to be very valuable. I would focus less on the specific tools that are in the market and more on the why behind your work. Go deep on the industry use cases around these advanced technologies to understand their application to business processes and decision making. This experience is where the magic is and will be translatable to the next set of technoligies that come along. Keep in mind that at your age you will no doubt have several careers before you are done working. I went from finance to consulting to IT sales during the last 30 years but consistently applied my learnings from industry exposure.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Micheal’s Answer

Alejandro and Becky both have great points. Do you want to see some of the questions that data science answers I would direct you to Kaggle and look at some of the posted contests and some of the posted data sets that have already been working. Ran. Data science answers a lot of questions. Sometimes it even leads you to the right question to ask. I work in healthcare in one of the biggest data science. Questions for healthcare right now is for someone to build a predictor model that will essentially predict a patient being rehospitalized within 30 days being discharged from the hospital above 92% probability. So check those out. It's very interesting and I think in 15 years it will still be growing strong.
Thank you comment icon Thank you Micheal, this is was insightful. Being able to predict a patient being rehospitalized within 30 days sounds really interesting and useful in the Healthcare industry as this would help save lives as well as cost. I will definitely look at Kaggle for related contests. Blessing
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Blessing,

Absolutely, launching your career in Information Technology (IT) straight out of college can be a smart move.

The IT sector is in high demand and continues to expand, offering a wealth of opportunities for fresh graduates. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts an 11% growth in computer and information technology jobs from 2019 to 2029, a rate much faster than the average for all occupations. This surge is fueled by the ever-growing reliance on technology and data across various sectors.

Starting your journey in the IT world early allows you to accumulate hands-on experience, establish a professional network, and stay abreast of the latest technologies and trends. Additionally, many firms provide training programs and chances for career progression, helping you to hone your skills and expertise further.

However, there are a few hurdles that fresh graduates may encounter when stepping into the IT job market:

Intense competition: As the demand for IT professionals rises, so does the number of applicants for these roles. This competitive atmosphere may pose a challenge for new graduates seeking their first job in the sector.

High standards: Employers frequently expect newcomers to be well-versed in the latest technologies and best practices. This expectation can be daunting for recent graduates who may not have had exposure to all the necessary tools and techniques during their studies.

Adjusting to the professional setting: The shift from an academic to a professional environment can be tough for some new graduates. Juggling multiple projects, meeting deadlines, and team collaboration are crucial skills that may take time to fully develop.

To tackle these challenges and boost your chances of securing an IT job right after college, consider these actionable tips:

Acquire hands-on experience: Engage in internships, co-op programs, or voluntary work during your college years to gain practical IT experience. This experience will make you more appealing to potential employers and help you cultivate vital professional skills.

Stay informed: Regularly learn about new technologies, trends, and best practices in the IT industry by attending workshops, webinars, or online courses. Platforms like Coursera, Udemy, or edX offer a range of IT-related courses that can help you stay up-to-date and enhance your skills.

Cultivate a robust network: Forge connections with IT professionals through networking events, conferences, or online platforms like LinkedIn. Building relationships with industry professionals can open up job opportunities or provide valuable insights into the job market.

Customize your resume and cover letter: Emphasize your relevant skills, experiences, and accomplishments when applying for IT jobs. Ensure your resume and cover letter illustrate how you can contribute to potential employers' goals and objectives.

Prepare for interviews: Get acquainted with common interview questions and practice your responses to boost your confidence and communication skills during interviews. Research the company and its products or services ahead of the interview to demonstrate your genuine interest in working for them.

May God bless you!
James Constantine.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Alejandro’s Answer

Hi Blessing! I believe Data Science is a very good career prospect as it literally is the future of business. One thing you can start doing is looking for certifications related to the field, several BI tools like Thoughtspot offer free trainings that will add a lot of value to your curriculum. I am a worker in the Digital Transformation Organization at HP and I am constantly working with different tools like Tableau, WEBI and Thoughspot trying to find ways to optimize data visualization; hence, being knowledgeable in these tools is totally a plus.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Alejandro for the advice. I have never heard of Thoughtspot. I will definitely look into it. It is good to know that there are other data visualization tools aside PowerBi and Tableau. I appreciate your input. Blessing
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Shyamsunder’s Answer

Here's a hot take: there absolutely be a career in analytics and data science in 15 years — arguably it may be even more important. But a lot of your prep can be through hands on work rather an in the classroom (not saying that the classroom isn't useful but there's a lot that they don't cover). I'll talk more from an analytics perspective.

- Any business/product will be interested in deeply understanding how they're doing and how they can continue to optimize performance. The level of insights we can provide has improved with better coding libraries/platforms etc. It depends on

- There's always a focus in any metrics on creating interpretable metrics and models and explaining data to non-technical people in a company. Academic courses skew towards a concepts first, project second appraoch, but on the job it's the reverse. There's a value in using the quickest/simplest method to acheive the same answer that's not really taught in university. There are analytics problems and then there are data science problems. Knowing the difference between both and having the ability to do both is incredibly valuable).

- As a data professional, you're always going to see the data way more than your peers and that makes communication and soft-skills even more important to bring everyone along the data journey. (Over half of HubSpot promotion criteria in each job level in analytics is soft skills). This is probably the #1 thing I look for when I interview candidates (over even technical skills).
- How do you tell a story with data, so other people can understand.
- How do you project manage asks? (People may not be close to the data in your company and may have a lot of questions, but you have limited time)
- How do you use data to drive strategic decision making in your company. (How do you convince an exec to make an important decision)

- Sometimes courses value accurate/academic writing but not business professional concise writing at times. Communicating in bullet points and key takeaways is a valuable skill. As you get senior, the job becomes more complex, and the stakeholders become even more senior with less patience for details, learning how to communicate with clarity is an incredibly valuable skill for a data professional.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Gary’s Answer

Wow, that's an amazing question! To be honest, we can't predict the future with certainty. However, I did search for future careers and found some interesting options in a link. As others have mentioned, Data Science is likely to stay relevant for a long time, but advancements in technology might change its landscape. For instance, AI/artificial intelligence could significantly transform things in the coming years. Good luck!

Top jobs for the future:
1. Software developer (and other coding careers)
2. Blockchain jobs
3. Virtual reality jobs
4. Ethical hacker (or any job in cybersecurity)
5. Big data analyst
6. Content creator
7. AI jobs
8. Data protection jobs
Thank you comment icon Thank you Gary for your input and taking time to do some research on my behalf. Yes, I agree that AI is changing the world right now and will even do more in the future. I will dig deeper into these career paths to see how they could align with mine. Blessing
0