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Business people, how do you grow your skills for business?

Business roles seem more focused on using soft skills like talking and meeting with coworkers. but some people just seem good at the role. like extroverts or something.

Did you do anything to develop your communication skills, or are you just good at talking? & How did you get good at talking? and are there any other skills you do besides... talking? lol

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Cassaundra’s Answer

My communication skills increased over time as I understood the impact my words may have on others. Most people don't understand the influence we have on each other and how small words and actions can have a meaningful impact on the people we interact with daily.

For example, if a manager tells you, "We need to talk" without any context, most will translate that into a story that doesn't end well. If that manager phrases it to provide more context or meaning, "When you're available, let's talk about a recent project you completed. I have some constructive feedback and questions for you about it," the expectation of the meeting and the story we tell ourselves changes dramatically.

It also helps to read a lot as well. Learning writing and communication styles through any kind of books, articles, and news can help you understand how language flows and increases your vocabulary over time.

Additionally, as Elizabeth mentions, active listening is a big part of communication. Staying curious and hearing the individual's thoughts first and responding, in turn, is better communication than forming your response before the other person has even finished their sentence. A small delay before answering is perfectly acceptable and often can make you seem more contemplative.
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Elizabeth’s Answer

The soft skills really shape who you are as a person and as a leader.
You want to be able to build empathy with your team - and that can come by simply doing fun things with them rather than just work.

Being a good listener is not always a given either. Many times we are so eager to respond that we don't really hear what people are saying.

Time management is vital since you are likely to have to juggle multiple projects at once, plus you'll need to balance your work and home life. It's not always easy to unplug and be in the moment when at home.

Problem-solving is another soft skill that is vital regardless of your role. You will always have some problem that needs a solution. How do you break it down, get to the root of the problem and come up with solutions?

Communication is another vital one since you need to know your audience. What and how you communicate to your team is likely going to be different when you present to a VP. Being able to tell a story (and tell it well) comes in very handy.
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Jerome’s Answer

I think it can start with a choice. I’ve had some amazing managers and I’ve had some pretty poor ones. I realized I could choose to treat people better than I wanted to be treated and strive to empower them with skills and support. Per of this was educating myself so I could accomplish this goal.

I am an introvert by nature, but found that just treating people well could make selling simple. Although it may be more challenging at times, all of the skills you mentioned can be learned and developed through classes, mentorship and mirroring the behavior of leaders you respect.
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Emari Grace’s Answer

I'm a balanced blend of extrovert and introvert, a practical problem-solver, and a KVA personality. During my first year in college, we used the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to delve into our personalities, and this understanding grew by the time we graduated.

From early childhood through college, our school administered learning tests to tailor their teaching style to our needs. It was a great way to understand our unique learning paths. You can also take similar tests to understand your learning style better.

Knowing these three aspects about yourself can greatly enhance your performance, both in your professional and social life.

We all know that public speaking can be daunting, and there's no magic trick to instantly become a pro. However, you can learn to manage your thoughts and emotions effectively to handle such situations.

Practice indeed makes perfect, but understanding your learning path and identifying your triggers and touchpoints can help you manage your thoughts better. It can guide you on how to articulate your thoughts into words effectively. Always prepare yourself before any presentation, meeting, or discussion.

If you struggle with immediate expression, consider starting a journal. I journal every day, and it helps me organize my thoughts, articulate my ideas, manage my emotions, and practice speaking. It even helps me identify areas for improvement. I used to struggle with processing my thoughts during discussions, but with consistent practice over the years, I've seen significant improvement. Those who know me have also noticed this progress. I hope these tips can help you too.
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A. Michelle’s Answer

Natalie - I was very fortunate to be taught public speaking starting in elementary school, but it’s never too late to improve your skills. My key takeaway - the more you practice speaking in small or large groups, the better and more comfortable you will become. For more formal presentations, the more knowledgeable you are about your subject, the more at ease you will be. The same applies to informal, one-on-one and small group conversations. Other important skills for business are writing, research, analysis, teamwork, influence and project management. All of these skills you can develop and practice even before you enter the workforce - in and outside of the classroom.
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Ann’s Answer

I learn something new every day. Even if it doesn’t directly relate to my role, it can sometimes be meaningful in other ways. For example, taking assessments about how others perceive you can teach you how to work better with others and them with you if you share results. There are tons of free online courses, including YouTube videos - and inexpensive courses from sites like Udemy. Psychology concepts are a great way to understand others. Emotional intelligence, empathy, etc.

Happy learning!
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