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What are some tips for a high school student who wants to be a lpn of a rn ?

im going to tenth grade can I /or Should I take college courses

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Christina’s Answer

Hi Ariyana,
I agree with Marie except I would encourage you to get the 4 year RN degree if you can. Often the 2 year programs have so many prerequisites that you end up spending almost the same amount of time getting the 2 year degree and then still have to go back for your Bachelors degree if you want to advance in your career later. Do your research. Check to see what the programs you are considering require or look at to get in. Also, there are some online BS Nursing programs which give you flexibility to work at the same time.
Lastly, get experience volunteering or working in a health related field. This gives you good exposure to various fields in medicine and shows commitment to the profession which nursing programs will take into account.

It's a great career which takes time and work. Hang in there. It's worth it.
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Marie’s Answer

Skip LPN and go for 2 year RN ( regerister nurse). Worth the extra year , working conditions, and money. Find out how to get College credits now, like Duel enrollment. This way you have a headstart on required courses for your RN degree. Some AP classes also give you college credit. Contact your local community College to see required courses and information on starting your RN degree path way . Message me for questions.
Best of Luck. ME
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Nicole’s Answer

An LPN certificate will do the same work an RN does for much less pay. Go for the BSN (registered nurse, bachelor prepared). You will find that is the better choice in the long run. TRUST ME.
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John’s Answer

As you navigate your high school journey, classes like biology and chemistry can serve as stepping stones towards your nursing career. Likewise, being comfortable with algebra and equation solving is crucial, given the need to calculate medication doses. Even though we're moving towards automated calculations, manual skills still hold value. If possible, consider college or dual enrollment classes such as Anatomy & Physiology and Microbiology to further boost your knowledge.

Once you graduate from high school, you'll have several pathways to pursue nursing. I highly recommend aiming for the registered nurse (RN) license over the licensed practical nurse (LPN) one, as it opens up a broader range of opportunities. You can either opt for a 2-year associate degree (ADN) or a 4-year bachelor degree (BSN). Both of these will qualify you to take the licensing test and become an RN.

The most suitable path to an RN license largely depends on your financial circumstances. If you're looking for a quick, cost-effective route, the ADN program is your best bet. These programs are typically provided by community colleges, which are significantly more affordable than private institutions. Plus, many states offer free tuition for 2 years at community colleges for recent graduates, so be sure to look into that.

An ADN doesn't limit your clinical capabilities. With the current nursing shortage in the US, RNs are in high demand, meaning you'll likely find employment opportunities in various areas as long as you hold a valid license. While a BSN provides additional prospects, it can be costly, especially if pursued through a private college, and it's not a prerequisite to start working as an RN. If you start with an ADN and later decide to further your education to a BSN for a managerial, research role, or to become a nurse practitioner, many employers offer tuition reimbursement.

Wishing you the very best on your journey.
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Emma’s Answer

For a high school student aspiring to become either a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Registered Nurse (RN), there are several tips to consider. First, focus on your academics, particularly in science courses like biology and chemistry, as they provide a strong foundation. Next, start gaining healthcare experience through volunteer work or part-time jobs in healthcare settings to familiarize yourself with the field. Research LPN and RN programs, their prerequisites, and the licensing requirements in your state. Pursue relevant coursework or extracurricular activities in high school to strengthen your application. Finally, seek guidance from a school counselor or a healthcare professional, and consider shadowing an LPN or RN to gain insight into the roles and responsibilities. Planning and preparation during high school will set a solid foundation for your nursing career.
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