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What are some good major options for me (context below)?

I’m going into running start and I want to become a surgeon of some sort (I’m not exactly sure what kind yet) and I don’t want to isolate myself into one career path just in case I change career paths at some point.

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Subject: Career question for you

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Rachel,

Great Academic Paths for Aspiring Surgeons

If you're contemplating a future in medicine, particularly as a surgeon, there are several academic paths that can lay a robust foundation for your career. Keeping in mind your interest in surgery and the desire to maintain flexibility in your career choices, it's vital to select a major that not only caters to your professional aspirations but also offers a comprehensive education applicable to a range of roles within the medical field.

1. Biology or Biochemistry: For those with a surgical career in mind, majoring in biology or biochemistry is an excellent option. These majors offer a strong grounding in the sciences, covering essential subjects such as anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and genetics, all of which are vital for understanding the human body and its workings. Moreover, these majors can enhance your critical thinking and problem-solving abilities, key skills for success in the medical profession.

2. Health Sciences or Pre-Medical Studies: Another beneficial choice for aspiring surgeons is a major in health sciences or pre-medical studies. These courses typically encompass subjects like medical ethics, healthcare systems, and patient care, fostering a holistic understanding of the medical field beyond just the scientific elements. Plus, these majors often provide hands-on experience through internships or clinical rotations, offering invaluable practical skills and exposure to various medical specialties.

3. Psychology or Sociology: While not traditional choices for pre-med students, psychology or sociology majors can also be beneficial for future surgeons. These courses focus on understanding human behavior, social interactions, and cultural influences, all of which are crucial for patient care and communication in the medical profession. Cultivating strong interpersonal skills and cultural competence is particularly useful for surgeons working with diverse patient groups.

In summary, when deciding on a major as a future surgeon, it's essential to choose one that aligns with your professional goals and offers a comprehensive education, encompassing both scientific knowledge and interpersonal skills. By considering majors such as biology or biochemistry, health sciences or pre-medical studies, and psychology or sociology, you can establish a robust foundation for your future surgical career while maintaining flexibility for potential career shifts.

Top 3 Reliable Sources Used:

American Medical Association (AMA): The AMA is a reliable source for information on medical education and healthcare careers. Their resources offer valuable insights into the requirements and pathways for becoming a surgeon.

Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC): The AAMC provides extensive information on medical school admissions, including recommended undergraduate majors and coursework for aspiring doctors.

U.S. News & World Report - Best Medical Schools: This source offers rankings and insights into various medical schools and programs, assisting students in making informed decisions about their educational journey towards becoming surgeons.

Stay blessed!
James Constantine.
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Audrey’s Answer

Hi Rachel,

The short answer is to do what you like!

The long answer is that medical schools look for three things: pre-requisite science and math class grades, a good overall GPA, and a good MCAT score. While pre-med degrees and science majors have many pre-requisite science and math classes already built into their degree programs, you don't need those majors to get into medical school. A good overall GPA is also important, and if there's a certain subject you're going to excel in, that will look better on your med school application. You have to take certain science and math courses anyway, so why not make undergrad an enjoyable experience rather than doing a biology or a chemistry degree if that isn't what you want? If it is what you like and want to do, that's great, but don't feel like those are your only options. Another thing to keep in mind is the MCAT doesn't just test you in science and math. Half of the test is devoted to subjects like psychology, sociology, and your ability to do critical reasoning and analysis of nonfiction (aka what you do in your history and English classes). So, a diverse education will help you with medical school admissions. My own class has plenty of biochemistry, biology, and chemistry majors - that's true. But we also have people who studied engineering, business, public health, education, psychology, sociology, political science, English, philosophy, Spanish, and even music theory.

I hope this helps!
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Enise’s Answer

Hello Rachel.

I feel you as I read your recent post. Career path is crucial part you can imagine. Find your inner talent and passion with hard skills and soft skills and emotional intelligence skills with job requirements in the description.

You can have a list of your interest and talents with skills as I mentioned. If you have any career experiences, you can match with any job requirements from the description. You can look at LinkedIn job announcements on (most likely) posts, and job section. Yet there are variety websites you can apply for the job.

Have a match with your skills and previous experiences with the job requirements and have a think about how you can fit the job, how you can adapt with co-workers, how you can prepare yourself to work on your field.

Do not forget the interview questions they will ask in the future. You have to surf the internet to look at the questions and prepare yourself before it is too late. Each questions may test you for your talent, passion, career, and hard & soft skills & emotional intelligence. Have a list of your previous works that you worked on and think how many different or similar roles you have experienced any skills you worked at the company.

I hope this helps.
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