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How I Prepare For Admission Interview In Oxford University?

My journey started when I got good grades in the college business subject, now I am pursuing my education for an MBA and I am really excited because I had enough marks to be eligible for Oxford University. First I wrote my admission essay on my own and proofread it by my college teacher They found many problems with it but she suggested I take the service of assignment helper London whose have experience in getting ideal essay for Oxford University because many students have gone to Oxford with the help of this service.
By listening to my professor, I also applied for this service and got a magnificent admission essay that I sent to Oxford University and got a call for an interview but I had no knowledge of how to convince them to get me admission or that I am best fit for their university. So please help me, it is my dream to pursue my education at this college

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Subject: Career question for you

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Alison’s Answer

Firstly, congratulations on your interview!

You have earned the right and the opportunity to be invited for the interview, and you should remember that when going in.

I would say it isn't so much about convincing them to admit you and more about selling your qualities to them. Start with the feedback that you have received so far and use that to sell your qualities to them and use some examples to illustrate those qualities.

In addition to you selling yourself to them, don't be scared to ask them what they can provide for you. Research them in advance and have some questions prepared, you are making an investment to them too.

Good luck!
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Jason’s Answer

Hi,

Research Oxford University and be prepared to articulate what is drawing you to the institution in particular. It can't be only that it's a top institution or that you've heard about it from family or friends. Be prepared to give specific examples. UK schools are very major driven so you need to know how to explain why you want to study the major you are choosing. Oxford is one of the most competitive in the world. Having the grades and test scores is not enough. Prepare your pitch about why you deserve a spot over the other students with the same academic qualifications as you.
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Shashank’s Answer

Hi Emma,

Interview experiences whether for jobs or colleges can be an intense experience or a breeze, depends on how you tackle these. In either case, demand exceeds supply and a large number of applicants have similar profiles - great grades, volunteer work, extra curriculars etc. So it ends up being about how you stand out. Colleges want diversity not just in name but also experiences. So if you have a unique background that will always help. If not, it ends up being about how you stand out in the interview and convince them you stand out from the crowd.

A lot of life is about how you 'tell the story.' A standard thing you'll learn later in your career is SCS - situation, complication and solution. Once you're done with introductions, you'll get specific questions from your past experiences, achievements, failures. You can make ordinary stories very interesting with the above template. If you ever listen to great speakers (or shows/movies), it'll start with a situation, build into a complication and then overcoming the adversity. This simple mantra can keep the panel interested and you will remain in their thoughts long after the interview.

Be conversational, believe you deserve to be there and speak with confidence and excitement. "My story is worth listening to."
Goo luck!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Getting ready for an interview at Oxford University is like preparing for a big adventure - it needs a good plan and plenty of preparation. The interview is a key part of the journey, where the university gets to see if you're a good fit for the program and if you have the potential to excel academically. To boost your chances of success, it's important to step into the interview with confidence and a clear demonstration of your love for the subject.

Here are some handy steps to help you gear up for an admission interview at Oxford University:

1. Dive into the Course: Kick-off by diving deep into the course you've applied for. Get to know the curriculum, modules, and any special focus areas. This will help you tailor your answers during the interview and show that you're genuinely interested in the subject.

2. Get the Hang of Oxford's Interview Style: Oxford University has a unique way of conducting interviews, focusing on your critical thinking skills and your ability to engage in academic discussions. Get the hang of this style by watching mock interviews or reading about past candidates' experiences. This will give you a sense of what's coming and how to tackle the questions.

3. Revisit Your Application: Take a stroll through your application materials, including your personal statement and admission essay. Make sure you're comfortable with the content and can elaborate on any points if asked during the interview. Be ready to talk about your motivations, experiences, and future goals related to the course.

4. Try Out Mock Interviews: Practicing mock interviews is a great way to get ready for the real deal. Get help from teachers, mentors, or professionals who can conduct mock interviews and give you helpful feedback. This will help you polish your answers, enhance your communication skills, and boost your confidence.

5. Keep Up with Current Affairs: Oxford University often weaves current affairs into their interviews to gauge candidates' ability to think critically and apply knowledge to real-world scenarios. Keep up with current events related to your field of study and be ready to discuss them during the interview.

6. Read Broadly: Showing a wide understanding of your subject area is crucial. Read broadly and explore various viewpoints on the topics you're interested in. This will allow you to engage in meaningful discussions during the interview and display your intellectual curiosity.

7. Gear Up for Subject-Specific Questions: Depending on the course you've applied for, you might be asked specific questions to assess your knowledge and understanding. Review your academic materials, textbooks, and lecture notes to make sure you're ready to answer such questions.

8. Reflect on Your Journey: Spend some time reflecting on your academic and extracurricular journey. Think about how these experiences have influenced your interest in the subject and what skills or qualities you've developed as a result. Being able to express these experiences and their impact will show your dedication and suitability for the program.

9. Practice Time Management: Oxford interviews can be intense and require quick thinking. Practice managing your time effectively during practice interviews or while answering sample questions. This will help you stay focused and deliver well-organized responses within the given time.

10. Be Genuine: Lastly, remember to be genuine during the interview. Oxford University appreciates authenticity and wants to get to know the real you. Show enthusiasm, curiosity, and a readiness to learn. Be confident in expressing your thoughts and opinions while remaining respectful of others' perspectives.

Top 3 Reliable Reference Publications or Websites:

1. University of Oxford - www.ox.ac.uk
2. Oxford University Press - www.oup.com
3. The Guardian - www.theguardian.com
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Joseph’s Answer

My advice for Oxford admissions is to genuinely show interest in the subject you are applying for and expressing that in the interview/application. This can be done by attending various talks (online or in person) about specific subjects that interest you, reading articles/books on the topic, reading news around the topic/subject, understanding the course structure and researching the main professors teaching the course and their expert areas. They don’t want perfection - they just want to see a real curiosity in a subject
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