10 answers

What are some good colleges to learn programming?

Asked Pensacola, Florida

I have did the hour of code on code.org and became more interested in programming. After that I have been learning the basics of programming and want it to be my career. I am a sophomore now. I need help on what will be the best schools for programming and the journey to get there. Thank you. #computer-science #programming #computer-programming

10 answers

Kenneth’s Answer

Updated Somerville, Massachusetts

Hi Earl,

I can't really advise you on what schools have good programming programs (or "programming courses" to avoid ambiguity). I can, however, give some insight to what to look for when evaluating schools that you look at. There are many aspects to computer programming. You could create websites, write apps, develop games or programs, work with graphics, or research the latest computing theory. Each of these is very different in terms of what tools you use and/or how you think about the problem. Some schools might be able to equip you with everything you need to know about websites, games, and programs, but not teach you a lot of the theory and principles you would need to know to be a researcher.

I would advise that unless you know exactly what area of programming you want to pursue that you consider how well a school teaches you about the theories and principles of computer programming. Whether they use the latest programming language should not be a deal breaker or even a very important matter to consider. Instead look for what they teach you about how computers work. I would consider asking whether a school teaches any shell scripting or assembly code (very low-level programming where you're working very closely with actual computer storage space. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-level_programming_language). Even if you don't plan to use these technologies, knowing about them is good, and you would be surprised how often you actually will want to write a shell script even in a seemingly unrelated field.

To sum up I would look for schools that provide at least some low-level programming instruction and that give you solid programming principles that are applicable to every field of computer science. Good computer theory and even history is important too. These are all more important in the long run than learning the latest languages and coding programs.

For preparing for school, you're in luck! There are a lot of things you can do to prepare yourself to go to college for a degree in computer programming. One of the wonderful things about learning to program is that there are tons of resources for free online that you can learn from. I would suggest picking a simple language (I would recommend Java or Python for starters if you aren't already familiar with a language), find some programming tutorials which are just a short google search away, and start writing some small programs. Once you get comfortable, I would recommend that you try to write something bigger that you can put a lot of time into and be proud of. A project like that would really help you get a head-start in a school--maybe even allow you to skip a class. It will also catch the attention of professors and might help you get into the school you want.

Let me know if you have any questions about anything I said, I'd be happy to help however I can.

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Thank you very much. I also would like recommended resources or websites that will aid in my preparation for school for programming.
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Sure thing Earl. Oracle has lots of tutorials for learning java on their website: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/. http://www.learnpython.org/ seems like a good place to learn Python. I have not personally used either of those, but they look good. If you're having trouble with those for any reason I'm sure you can easily find more with just a quick google search. Some basic tutorials should be good to start to get comfortable in your languages. Once your comfortable, you can look up any function by looking at the language libraries: https://docs.python.org/2/library/ for Python or http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/ for Java. Stack Overflow (http://stackoverflow.com/) is also a great resource. If you have any questions about your code they've probably already been asked.
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Thank you. With this information I should be on my way to my dream career.
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Thank you!

Eric’s Answer

Updated Cambridge, Massachusetts

I echo what Kenneth Smith said. Many colleges can teach you enough to get started, and college really only can help you get started. Having work of your own to show off will both teach you a huge amount, and can help you impress potential employers.

codeacademy.com is another very good website for learning to program. The more you can learn before you have to pick a college, the more informed decision you can make about their courses, as well.

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Thank you!

Vijoy’s Answer

Updated Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

School Name Distinction Location University of California - Berkeley Offers research and instructional programs through the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) department Berkeley, CA

University of Texas at Austin In Bill and Melissa Gates Computer Science Complex and Dell Computer Science Hall students can learn a large amount about computer sciences Austin, TX

Princeton University Includes six residential colleges Princeton, NJ

Blackhawk Technical College Associate's degree programs in computer programming Janesville, WI

Winter Park Tech Certificates programs in computer programming Winter Park, FL

Western Dakota Technical Institute Programming and application development programs Rapid City, SD

Egemen’s Answer

Updated Kirkland, Washington

I'll present another perspective to your question: you can contribute to your programming skills by studying on topics that don't necessarily fall under "programming" category. Programmers are people who like to solve puzzles, in our case they are math related puzzles.

After learning the basics of a programming language, I strongly suggest you try your newfound skill on problems that can be solved through a computer program. Project Euler is a great help in this endeavor (https://projecteuler.net/). It's a website that has a lot of math/programming related problems and you can familiarize yourself with the way most of us are tackling problems with the help of computers just by solving these problems.

vineet’s Answer

Updated Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Most of the programming I learned was not in college! It was on the job. But, college can give you the overview you need to learn more. To be a good programmer, you need to be able to learn new things. But, once you get the basics down, you will be able to learn easier next time! pick the college that you like and check the course offerings best things is to learn on your own and start creating. Anything you learn now, will help you with college

Steve’s Answer

Updated Haddonfield, New Jersey

Hi Earl, Most of the programming I learned was not in college! It was on the job. But, college can give you the overview you need to learn more. To be a good programmer, you need to be able to learn new things. But, once you get the basics down, you will be able to learn easier next time!

With that said, pick the college that you like and check the course offerings. Most colleges will touch on one or two languages. Then, you will learn even more in a graduate program.

But, the best things is to learn on your own and start creating. Anything you learn now, will help you with college. Good Luck!

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Thank you!

andreamarily’s Answer

Updated Austin, Texas

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Samson’s Answer

Updated San Francisco, California

Hello! I'm not sure which school would be best for you. A lot of other sites listed above by others are very helpful as well. I personally use Coursera.

https://www.coursera.org/

This site provides free courses on multiple topics taught by universities. I hope this helps getting you started.

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Thank you I will look into it
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Fantastic Earl. Best of luck.
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Thank you!

andreamarily’s Answer

Updated Austin, Texas

for more information about the Good Training Institute Details & reviews in Sulekha it

Rachel’s Answer

Updated

<span class="ql-cursor"></span><span style="background-color: transparent;">Collegeboard.org is a great resource for this! I poured through the pages of universities all over the U.S. when I was a senior in high school. Collegeboard was my go-to site! They put all of the information in one place and it is very easy to use. They even have various filters you can apply to see only colleges that have programs you are interested. To determine academic rigor, look at the admissions requirements, G.P.A. of past admitted applicants, SAT/ACT scores, class rank etc. This will give you an idea of what scores and grades you need to be accepted. However, don't be discouraged your application will be reviewed based on the full picture! College-board will help you get an idea of what is most important to the specific school you are applying to.</span>


This professional recommends the following next steps:

  • <span style="background-color: transparent;">Chat with your Guidance Counselor</span>
  • <span style="background-color: transparent;">Create a Collegeboard.org account</span>
  • <span style="background-color: transparent;">Start using CollegeBoard as a resource to look up schools.</span>