Skip to main content
7 answers
7
Asked 347 views

What does law school involve I know that you Lear different jargon and vocabulary but do you learn about types of law??

What does law school involve? I know that you Lear different jargon and vocabulary but do you learn about types of law? How do you get experience in law school?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

7 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Robert’s Answer

The main thing that you learn in law school is how to think like a lawyer. How to break down a statute, how to parse technical jargon in a way that is understandable, and how and where to look for the answers that you don't know. Law school introduces you to the general concepts procedure for civil and criminal law. It also teaches constitutional law, tax law, legal research, writing, and mock trial. It doesn't get down to the state level in terms of laws and primarily focuses on federal aspects.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

DENNIS’s Answer

Hi Rena:
Believe it or not you learn all sorts of stuff! First, as Robert points out - you learn to think like a lawyer. I did not believe that but after my first year I was home and realized I was thinking differently. Odd but true. It changes you and you really don't notice. Second, you learn all types of law. Law is constantly changing. You learn all the basic concepts and you are free to go into whatever field you are interested in. Third, you learn about yourself. Law school is very stressful. Not everyone can cut it! You learn your own limits and what motivates you. However, it is also fun. Yes fun! It is a challange and as you push yourself and succeed you realize hard work does pay off. I would not change a second of my law school days!
Rena, if you want to be a lawyer, do not believe the stuff you see on TV. Go to your local Courthouse and sit in and watch what goes on. Ask questions; ask the clerks, the lawyers there and even the Judge - they would all love to help you. Plus they will all tell you the truth about the practice of law!
So go have fun and enjoy being a kid!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Job’s Answer

You will take classes in many different types of law, so you will be introduced to many types of law.
You will learn how to understand the importance of past case rulings and how the rules work in each type of law.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mackenzie’s Answer

Law school is a rigorous educational program designed to prepare students for careers in the legal profession. It typically involves three years of intensive study, research, and legal training. Here's an overview of what law school entails:

1. **Core Curriculum**: Law school begins with a core curriculum that covers fundamental legal subjects, including but not limited to:
- Contracts
- Torts (civil wrongs)
- Constitutional Law
- Criminal Law and Procedure
- Property Law
- Civil Procedure
- Legal Research and Writing
- Evidence
- Professional Responsibility (legal ethics)

2. **Legal Research and Writing**: Legal research and writing are integral components of law school. Students learn how to conduct legal research, analyze case law, statutes, and regulations, and draft legal documents such as memoranda, briefs, and motions.

3. **Elective Courses**: In addition to core courses, law schools offer a wide range of elective courses that allow students to explore specific areas of law in greater depth. These courses can cover topics like international law, intellectual property, environmental law, and more.

4. **Clinical Programs**: Many law schools have clinical programs that provide students with practical experience. Students work on real cases, represent clients, and gain hands-on experience in areas such as criminal defense, family law, immigration, and more.

5. **Moot Court and Mock Trial**: Moot court and mock trial competitions allow students to hone their advocacy skills by participating in simulated courtroom proceedings.

6. **Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility**: Courses on legal ethics and professional responsibility are critical for understanding the ethical obligations lawyers have to their clients, the court, and society.

7. **Legal Seminars and Workshops**: Law schools often offer seminars and workshops on specific legal topics or emerging areas of law. These provide opportunities for in-depth exploration of specialized subjects.

8. **Legal Research Tools**: Students learn to use legal research tools and databases to find relevant case law, statutes, regulations, and secondary sources.

9. **Exams and Grading**: Law schools typically use a grading system based on final exams, essays, and class participation. The grading scale often includes letter grades such as A, B, C, D, and F.

10. **Bar Exam Preparation**: Many law schools offer bar exam preparation courses in the final year of law school to help students prepare for the bar exam, which is required to practice law in most jurisdictions.

11. **Internships and Clerkships**: Students often seek internships or clerkships during law school to gain practical experience, network with legal professionals, and explore potential career paths.

12. **Legal Writing Projects**: In addition to traditional exams, law students are frequently required to complete legal writing projects, such as research papers or appellate briefs.

13. **Legal Ethics and Character and Fitness**: Students learn about the ethical obligations of lawyers and the character and fitness requirements for bar admission.

14. **Networking and Professional Development**: Law schools often provide opportunities for networking with legal professionals, attending seminars, and participating in extracurricular activities related to law and the legal profession.

15. **Bar Review**: After graduating from law school, many students enroll in bar review courses to prepare for the bar exam. These courses review the legal subjects tested on the bar exam and provide practice questions and exams.

Law school is intellectually challenging, and students are expected to engage actively in class discussions, research, and critical thinking. Graduates of law school earn a Juris Doctor (JD) degree and must pass the bar exam in their jurisdiction to become licensed attorneys.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Baljit’s Answer

Hello Rena,

Indeed, law school provides a comprehensive education on various types of law, all of which are also encompassed in the Bar Exam. In order to navigate through the intricate legal terminology, I highly recommend you keep a legal dictionary at your disposal. The one I found particularly useful was Black's Law Dictionary. It's compact but incredibly precise and straightforward to comprehend.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Rena,

You get experience in law school by participating in moot court, presenting information in class when called on by your professor, researching and writing - a big part of law!, doing internships over the summer, participating in legal aid clinics for members of the community, and being on the school journal. The first thing you will learn at your first job is how little you truly know. Staff in a legal office refer to first year lawyers as "baby lawyers" because there is so much they need to learn. BUT, the schooling gave you a solid foundation upon which to build - a way to be successful.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jacob’s Answer

Law school is an intensive and intellectually challenging journey that goes beyond just learning jargon and vocabulary. Here's an overview of what law school typically involves:

1. **Core Curriculum:** Law school typically begins with foundational courses in areas like contracts, torts, criminal law, constitutional law, and civil procedure. These courses provide a broad understanding of the legal system and principles.

2. **Legal Research and Writing:** Legal research and writing courses are a fundamental part of law school. Students learn how to find, interpret, and apply legal sources, and how to construct legal arguments and documents.

3. **Types of Law:** Law school covers various types of law, including criminal law, civil law, family law, environmental law, intellectual property law, and more. In your upper years, you have the opportunity to specialize in specific areas through elective courses.

4. **Socratic Method:** Law professors often use the Socratic method, engaging students in critical thinking and discussions to develop analytical and reasoning skills.

5. **Case Law:** You'll read and analyze numerous legal cases to understand how legal principles are applied in real-world situations.

6. **Legal Ethics:** Law schools emphasize ethical considerations and the importance of professional responsibility in the legal profession.

7. **Exams and Grading:** Law school exams typically consist of essay questions that require you to apply legal principles to hypothetical scenarios. Grading is often on a curve, which can be competitive.

8. **Clinical Programs:** Many law schools offer clinical programs where students gain practical experience by working on real cases under the supervision of experienced attorneys.

9. **Internships and Clerkships:** Students often seek internships or clerkships during the summer or school year at law firms, government agencies, or nonprofit organizations to gain practical experience.

10. **Moot Court and Mock Trial:** Participating in moot court or mock trial competitions allows students to develop oral advocacy and courtroom skills.

11. **Legal Writing Competitions:** Law schools may host legal writing competitions where students draft legal briefs or articles for publication.

12. **Bar Exam Preparation:** Law school prepares you academically, but you'll also need to take a bar exam after graduation to become a licensed attorney. Many students take bar prep courses during their final year.

Experience in law school is not limited to the classroom. To gain practical experience, consider participating in clinics, internships, externships, and legal organizations. Building a strong network with professors, mentors, and legal professionals can also open doors to valuable experiences and job opportunities.

It's essential to balance your academic studies with hands-on experience and networking to prepare for a successful career in law. Law school is demanding, but it's also a transformative experience that equips you with the skills and knowledge necessary to practice law effectively.
0