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What skills should I develop to prepare for a career in Psychology?

What skills do I need to succeed in that field, whether it's public speaking, writing, or understanding body language... What skills do you use every day that may be helpful to advise people looking more into that field?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Katherine’s Answer

I think it will be very useful for you to be aware of and at least somewhat familiar with books by John Townsend, Henry Cloud, Les and Leslie Parrott, the Gottmans, Gary Chapman, John Gray (including especially the book Beyond Mars and Venus), John Delony, Ross Campbell, and Terry Real--they are authors who have known a lot and put out a lot that shouldn't be lost to the newest generations of psychologists. There's also plenty online by most or all of these authors and you can become familiar with that. And become familiar with 12-step programs and what the availability of them is, and the various smallish limitations of them, and who generally is and isn't in favor of them and why, including books like The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie, and other books written by people who have a long tradition in the 12-step program movement and culture.

You might also decide to take a look at the Life Help section here (https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/life-help?lang=eng)--it definitely takes a religious, Christian perspective, but honestly, search anywhere and everywhere for other resources, and the most concise, best and most helpful foundational, fundamental things that have been pioneered in the field of psychology have come from a Christian background and people who do subscribe to a religious viewpoint. So even if that's not going to be your thing personally, being as familiar as you can be with what is out there from these authors and sources will help you really be informed about what's available, and then as you compare over your own education and career all the different things you find out about or try, you can make your own decision about what is most helpful.
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Mackenzie’s Answer

Preparing for a career in psychology involves developing a combination of academic knowledge, practical skills, and personal qualities. Here are the key skills and attributes you should cultivate:

Empathy and Compassion:
As a psychologist, you'll work with individuals facing emotional and mental challenges. Developing empathy and a compassionate attitude is crucial for building trust and rapport with clients.
Active Listening:
Effective communication begins with active listening. Practice listening attentively to others, showing understanding, and asking relevant questions.
Interpersonal Skills:
Cultivate strong interpersonal skills, as you'll often work one-on-one or in group settings. This includes the ability to build relationships, resolve conflicts, and collaborate effectively.
Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving:
Psychologists analyze complex issues and develop solutions. Sharpen your critical thinking and problem-solving abilities to assess and address a wide range of psychological problems.
Research Skills:
Research is a fundamental aspect of psychology. Familiarize yourself with research methodologies, data analysis, and statistical techniques. Proficiency in using statistical software like SPSS or R is often beneficial.
Ethical and Professional Conduct:
Adhere to ethical guidelines and professional standards in psychology. Maintain confidentiality, respect client autonomy, and ensure the well-being of those you serve.
Cultural Competence:
Develop cultural competence to work effectively with diverse populations. Understand and appreciate cultural differences, as they can significantly impact psychological processes and treatment.
Communication Skills:
Effective communication is vital for conveying complex psychological concepts to clients and colleagues. Work on your written and verbal communication skills.
Psychological Assessment and Evaluation:
Learn how to conduct psychological assessments and evaluations, including administering tests, interpreting results, and providing feedback to clients.
Therapeutic Techniques:
If you're interested in clinical psychology, become proficient in evidence-based therapeutic techniques, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), or psychoanalytic therapy.
Time Management and Organization:
Psychology careers often involve managing multiple clients, paperwork, and appointments. Develop strong time management and organizational skills to stay on top of your responsibilities.
Flexibility and Adaptability:
Psychology is a dynamic field, and clients' needs can change. Be adaptable and open to adjusting your approach and techniques as necessary.
Problem Identification:
Recognize signs and symptoms of psychological disorders and problems. Early identification is key to effective intervention.
Resilience and Self-Care:
Working in psychology can be emotionally demanding. Develop self-care practices and resilience to manage stress and maintain your own mental well-being.
Continuing Education:
Stay current with developments in the field by pursuing continuing education, attending workshops, and participating in professional organizations.
Computer and Technology Skills:
Familiarize yourself with technology and software commonly used in psychology, such as electronic health record (EHR) systems and teletherapy platforms.
Leadership and Teamwork:
If you plan to work in research or organizational settings, leadership and teamwork skills are valuable for managing projects and collaborating with colleagues.
Licensing and Certification:
Research the licensing and certification requirements in your area, as they vary by location and specialization. Ensure you meet the necessary qualifications for your desired career path.
Remember that the skills required in psychology can vary depending on your specific area of interest or specialization (e.g., clinical, counseling, research, school psychology). Tailor your skill development to align with your career goals and the population you aim to serve. Additionally, seek guidance and mentorship from experienced professionals in the field to gain insights and advice on skill development and career planning.
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Judith-Ann’s Answer

Lianette, psychology careers can lead to being a therapist, a reaseacher, business, training, and coaching. I believe the first question is to ask yourself what do you want to do with a psychology career? I have seen many people get a Bachelor's degree in Psychology and then not know where to look for a job. If you plan to stay in the psychology field, please plan to get a Doctorate. That will give you more education, more credibility, and make you more marketable.
No matter what path you decide to take, incorporate good listening skills. That means focus on what the person is saying and ask engaging questions. Be respectful, be nonjudgemental, and be curious. Those are the best skills!
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Katherine’s Answer

Hi! To prepare for a career in psychology, it's essential to cultivate certain skills. Firstly, strive to comprehend and connect with people's emotions and experiences, a skill known as empathy. Active listening is crucial, so ensure you're fully engaged when someone is sharing with you. It's also vital to practice articulating your thoughts and ideas lucidly, both in spoken and written form. Developing your critical thinking and problem-solving skills will be beneficial. As you delve into psychology, adhering to rules and guidelines is paramount, particularly when handling confidential information. Moreover, honing your interpersonal skills will enable you to build relationships and appreciate diverse cultures. Maintaining patience, flexibility, and prioritizing your own wellness are also key. Keep in mind, psychology is a broad field with numerous potential paths, but these skills will serve you well regardless of the route you select. Wishing you the best of luck! :)
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Shelisa’s Answer

Good Morning!! All-Stars

Thank you for your Question
It is #1.

When I was a teen and had a problem, I appreciated my friends being good listeners, very empathic, and Very communicative. So thankful that they did not leave me side until I was ok!!

Those are some of the attributes I used daily as a Child Psychologist

Hope this helps !!!
Good Luck!!!🌞🌞🌞🌞
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Yisel’s Answer

Hi Lianette,

Your question is truly excellent! Let me begin by saying that the field of Psychology is a vast and fascinating realm. Depending on the specific area you choose to specialize in, you'll need to approach it with an open heart and mind. Always remember, this profession is a powerful tool to extend a helping hand to those in need within our community. Mental wellness is an essential aspect of everyone's life.

Here's a helpful link that I've found for you. It lists the Top 10 skills needed for every psychologist. Feel free to peruse this in your leisure time: https://www.fnu.edu/top-10-skills-every-psychologist-needs/.

Remember, don't limit yourself to acquiring a fixed set of skills. Some of the most valuable skills will be developed through hands-on experience in the field, beyond what any textbook or classroom can teach. Lastly, take the time to explore the diverse areas of psychology. Find the one that truly sparks your interest and dive deep into it.
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