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what is the annual salary for a broadway performer

how much is given, is it a lot for expensive luxury #professor #singer #director #actors #broadway #dancers

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Nicole’s Answer

To be in a Broadway show, you would need to be part of the Actors Equity Association. They negotiate standard contracts for Principals, Chorus and Stage Managers. Each is different -- number of hours you are allowed to work, base pay, number of performances/week, etc. Contracts can be reviewed at: http://actorsequity.org/agreements/agreement_info.asp?inc=001


At one point, the minimum rate for a AEA member on Broadway was around $1200/week. If you were to get a show that ran for a year, and lucky you would be, your annual salary would have been $62400, before taxes. Typically, only "stars" make above the minimum allowed.

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David’s Answer

Joel:
You have a tricky and multi-part question with only very little specific info available.


Practically speaking, there is no (average) "annual salary" on Broadway.
- basic minimum now is just over $1,300/week (before taxes, dues, pension, etc)
- VERY SMALL percentage of actors who do get the chance to perform on Broadway are actually employed for a full year
- IF you're lucky enough to getting more than "minimum" that's usually negotiated on an individual basis (thus another 'deduction' for your Agent and/or Manager fees).


The second part of your question "...a lot for expensive luxury" is really redundant.
"Expensive luxury" IS going to COST "a lot".
If, however, you mean 'does it cover the expenses of living in NYC'? - the answer is maybe -and- probably not.
- if you get on contract show, IF that show runs more than 6 months, if you have roommate(s) to split expenses, then maybe - if you're careful about personal expenses.
- if you get into a contract show which is "limited run" or closes within a few months, you better make sure you have 'fall-back skills' [for Temp jobs] or a flexible schedule day job [often called the 'survival job'] plus a very understanding manager at work.


Most actors try to supplement their incomes with Off-B'way work, Touring, and now -since the number of productions has increased- TV and/or Movie work.


Sorry if this sounds grim and negative, but it is honest. You HAVE TO "REALLY" WANT IT.

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