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Howard MBA or Johns Hopkins MBA?

I am trying to choose between these two MBA programs (Howard or Johns Hopkins). Does anyone know the main differences between these two programs? I am specifically interested in the "online"/part time version of each program. Thank you!

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Houcine’s Answer

Choosing between the Howard and Johns Hopkins MBA programs is a significant decision, especially when considering the online or part-time options. To make an informed choice, it's crucial to weigh various factors. Both programs likely differ in curriculum structure, faculty expertise, networking opportunities, and overall program reputation. Research the course offerings, flexibility in scheduling, and the support systems available for part-time students. Consider reaching out to current students or alumni from each program for firsthand insights into their experiences. Additionally, compare tuition costs, financial aid options, and any unique features that set each program apart. Attend virtual information sessions or open houses to get a feel for the program culture and ask specific questions about the online or part-time formats. Ultimately, your decision should align with your career goals, learning preferences, and the overall fit of the program with your aspirations. Good luck in making this important choice!
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Danielle’s Answer

Drawing from my personal experience and recruiting MBAs throughout my career, I'd like to share some insights to guide you on your journey. Your ultimate aim is to secure a job or ascend in your current role, ensuring that your MBA investment pays off. You should aim for a program that best facilitates this goal. While reputation plays a role, there are several other factors to consider:

1) Each school has its unique strengths and specialties. Determine how these align with your interests. MBA programs often excel in specific areas, attracting a multitude of companies seeking students in those fields. However, lesser-known areas of study may attract fewer employers, making the job search slightly more challenging.

2) Full-time students often enjoy the bulk of recruitment opportunities, so it's important to investigate who specifically recruits from part-time programs. A strong Career Services department for part-time students is crucial.

3) My preliminary research indicates that Howard's online program is relatively new (established in 2020), and their website provides limited information regarding the support available for flex program careers. The quality of education and curriculum parallels the in-person experience, but details on recruitment and career support specific to online students are lacking. It would be intriguing to learn about their support plans for the inaugural graduating class.

3) On the other hand, Hopkins provides a comprehensive outline of the career services and support available specifically for flex students. It seems quite extensive. However, it would be beneficial to know who recruits from there and the balance between your personal efforts and the support you can expect from their services.

Both schools are undoubtedly excellent choices. If one offers a more attractive financial aid package or scholarships, this could tip the scales in their favor.
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Atul’s Answer

Do both universities provide the option of an online, part-time MBA?
It's unclear whether Johns Hopkins offers an online, part-time MBA. If they do, have you considered what major you'd like to pursue for your MBA?
Make sure you've met their admission requirements, such as the GRE and GMAT scores.
Regarding financing, do you have the means or are you planning on securing scholarships from either university for the MBA? This could help you avoid student loans, which have significantly higher rates now than before the Covid pandemic.
While Johns Hopkins is generally more respected than Howard, there are other factors to consider. For instance, what industry do you want to work in, and does this profession require an MBA for career advancement?
Remember, struggling to find employment with your undergraduate degree doesn't necessarily mean pursuing an MBA is the best solution.
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Michelle’s Answer

Hello, Teriyana !

You certainly have a big choice to make because both Howard University and Johns Hopkins are famous names noted to be prestigious schools. I would like to give you some advice that may help you decide between the two as schools, but I am not familiar with them as on-line schools.

For starters, Howard is going to be a lot less expensive tuition-wise than Johns Hopkins. You just may want to base it on that alone. Also, Howard's acceptance rate is much higher than Johns Hopkins. If you ever had to go there in person for anything, they are about the same distance from where you live. Howard allows for a lower entrance test score, also, so that may play a part in your decision.

So it looks like, on the surface, Howard University is the more reasonable choice based on cost and acceptance rate. You are interested in their Masters of Business Administration course of study online. I am not familiar with it, but I suggest looking at the requirements of Howard University's program. Note which courses that are required and any projects that you'd have to do. If Howard's program is acceptable to you, go for it ! It is just my personal opinion, but if you are going to do this degree on line, I would urge you to go with the less expensive college. For me, this would be the one deal-maker for my decision. Both schools are accredited, well-known and have credentialed professors so you can't go wrong.

If Howard's MBA online course of study is very unacceptable to you, than you would have to take a chance with spending more money for Johns Hopkins or look into other schools. Here are some other schools that you can find out more about their course of MBA study and choose the one you like : These are all on line MBA programs. Rice University, University of Miami, University of California at Davis, Texas A & M International University, Grand Canyon University and Southern New Hampshire University. Since you are the one taking the courses and will be putting the work in, it is up to you to approve of what courses to take at which school. Also, keep in mind, we all had to take at least one or two classes that were required to take that we didn't exactly enjoy much, so see which programs you can do - the courses should almost be very similar for an MBA.

I have provided a link below to the on line colleges I mentioned above. Compare their offerings and I know you will make the best personal choice either Howard, Johns Hopkins or one of the above programs. Best wishes to you in whatever you decide.

Michelle recommends the following next steps:

https://www.bschools.org/faq/what-is-a-typical-mba-curriculum ALTERNATIVE ON LINE MBA PROGRAMS
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. Teriyana
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for taking the time to throughly write this information! I especially appreciated the highlighted details about cost going to campus versus online. Thank you again! Teriyana
Thank you comment icon You are very welcome, Teriyana ! Michelle Marotta
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Jen’s Answer

Hi Teriyana!
Amazing choices and congratulations on preparing for your future!

Both amazing schools and I am a little biased being a graduate of Howard University. However, I suggest creating a matrix of what is important to you and what you want to get out of getting this MBA. While cost is likely always the determining factor, put that aside for the time being and focus on the characteristics of the program.
1) Job rate after graduation - while you can go to an amazing program, if the job success rate after graduation is low, then consider if it's worth it. The whole point of the MBA is to obtain a higher paying job. This is crucial.
2) Immersive program - do you want to focus on international travel or studies. Talk to alum (or current students) about this if this is something you want out of your MBA experience
3) Classroom format - is it case based or discussion based - or a hybrid. Understanding the teaching and learning pattern of the program will help you decide what works best for you.
There are a number of other factors so take some time to really think about this and figure out what is the best program for YOU.

Other two pieces of advice when considering the MBA - if you currently have undergrad debt, I would say, spend some time paying that debt down or off before starting the program. It's a big financial relief if you can and helps if you need to take loans for your MBA.
Ensure that getting an MBA makes sense for your future life goals. If is doesn't, then consider deferring or getting another professional certificate. MBAs are an investment and you want your ROI in the future.

Best of luck!!
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