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How did you know what you wanted to do for school?

How did you know what you wanted
To do for school?

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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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8 answers


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Paul’s Answer

I think for me it was something that peaked my interest. Something that kept my interest and excited me.

There are always going to be people, who will tell you that you need to pursue the big money majors or occupations.

But, if you are not interested in those areas, you will never stay with them, and will eventually move on to something that you love to do, and maintains your mental health and cognitive abilities.
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Anna’s Answer

I was lucky and found things that I was passionate about young. I always loved performing and knew I wanted to incorporate it into my studies somehow. I also knew that it would be a hard life and so I found a career that utilized a lot of the skills of theatre and fell in love with events! You get to be creative and have fun, you have to be structured, and you have to be able to think on your feet!
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Steve’s Answer

That is a great question, Victoria!

For me, I didn't. I went into Business School because I felt it was good and stable and I could make a good living and got a degree in Accounting and Specialized management, and 9 Months in I realized I really did not like what I was doing and went back to school at night to get a degree in Computer Science. I have friends and families that learned in college what they wanted to do and switched majors and I know others that knew what they wanted to do in Middle or High School and pursued it from there all the way through college and into the work world.

What I am trying to say is while it is a great question there is no one perfect answer and my answer may not be yours.

My suggestion and what I have told my children, nieces, nephews, etc. is if you think you know what you might want to do talk to people that are doing it, shadow them if you can, (even if you don't know anyone directly ask friends, family or anyone you trust as they may know someone). I know someone I was speaking to this weekend and she want to go into Politics/Policy work and she reached out to every legislator she could find and has multiple shadowing opportunities.

If you do think you know what you want to do, still be flexible and listen to other people that are close to you because they may have objective insights you have overlooked or perspectives that may make you think differently, although I caution you as you listen think to yourself are they giving me a suggestion that they think will work for me or what worked for them (some people cannot give advice outside of their own perspective of themselves).

If you do not have strong opinions on what you want to do don't stress about it, embrace it, you are not limited to what you know for every profession you know about there are a dozen you don't. Talk to people ask them not only what they do but what they like about what they do or what they don't like about what they do. Determine when you look at careers do I want to work in an office, do I want to travel, do I want to work directly with customers, do I want to work with children and all of the things that may not be the skills needed for a job but can absolutely contribute to you satisfaction and ultimately is a major contributor how successful you are.

I hope this helps and I will close with there is a lot of advice, some good and some not so much, listen to it but you are not bound to it, use your judgement to decide what applies to you and what may not and remember whatever you decide it is not limiting you to only that forever you have your whole life ahead of you to learn and grow and evolve and the fact that you are seeking advice and thinking about the future already is a great start!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Victoria!

Let's Dive into Discovering Your Passions and Interests

Choosing a course of study can be a big deal, and it's something that often requires you to really get to know yourself, explore different options, and seek advice. Figuring out what you want to study usually means thinking about what you love, what you're good at, and what your dreams for the future are. Here are some things that might help you decide what to study:

Self-Reflection: Lots of people figure out what they want to study by taking some time to think about what they love doing, what they're good at, and what really grabs their attention. It can also be helpful to think about what you're not so good at, and what's really important to you.

Trying Out Different Things: Getting to know a bunch of different subjects and experiences can help you figure out what you're really into. This could be through school, clubs, internships, volunteering, or even just hobbies. Trying out different things can give you a better idea of what you really love.

Getting Advice: Talking to mentors, teachers, counselors, or professionals can be really helpful when you're trying to figure out what to study. They can give you advice, tell you about their own experiences, and help you make decisions.

Doing Your Homework: Looking into different areas of study and career options can help you make a good decision about what to study. It can be helpful to know what kinds of jobs are out there, what's happening in different industries, and what opportunities might be available to you.

Following Your Heart: For lots of people, choosing what to study is all about following their passion and finding a sense of purpose. Figuring out what really gets you excited and motivated can help you decide what to study.

Thinking About the Future: Thinking about your long-term career goals can also influence what you decide to study. You might choose to study something that will prepare you for the career you dream of.

Top 3 Go-To Reference Publications:

Harvard Business Review: This is a well-known publication that has lots of great articles about business management, leadership, economics, and career development.

Stanford University’s Office of Undergraduate Admission: Stanford University's resources on undergraduate admission have lots of helpful information about exploring academics, self-assessment, and choosing a field of study.

Psychology Today: Psychology Today has lots of great content about self-reflection, making career decisions, and personal development.

These sources were used to gather information about how to figure out what you're interested in and make a good decision about what to study.

PS
Don't forget to check out the healthy eating tips at the end of my bio. They'll help you get all the nutrients you need to stay healthy and do well in your studies!

Wishing you all the best!
James.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. There are plenty of activities and classes you can do in school.

Firstly, in terms of subjects, you may consider to take the subjects that are relevant to your future career. Have you thought about you would like to do in the future?
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, etc. and identify the related careers
E.g. If you like music, would like to be a musician, singer, musical artist, music producer, music composer, etc.
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be an accountant, engineer, banker, financial analyst, maths teacher, etc.
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers.
4. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
5. Choose subjects that are relevant to these careers

On the other hand, for the extra curriculum activities, you can join those you have interest. And, you can change or join another in next semester if you find something else is more interesting. Also, you can participate to organize the activities.

Hope this helps! Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon Rebecca, thank you! Victoria
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Alan’s Answer

Victoria, I can give you the perfect answer: I didn't. That was okay for me, and it's okay for you. I was particularly young when I entered college. I had the vaguest of ideas that I wanted to become a teacher, but wasn't at all sure what that meant specifically for me. It was also a different time, one when many students became involved in events that seemed more important than what was happening inside of classrooms. I don't regret that, and wouldn't blame students today if they did the same. It took until getting out in the world and then going back to graduate school that I found my calling as far as a career went. And even so, I made adaptations along the way.

For you, the best advice I can give is to consider what your interests, hobbies, skills, experiences and values are and how they might take shape in a fulfilling career. There are quizzes on the internet that can help you narrow down your best options based on such considerations. You can start looking at college websites and see what programs and classes they offer and how they might appeal to you. You can certainly talk with your guidance counselor and the academic advisors of colleges you might be considering. You can do some volunteering in areas that might provide clues. But there's nothing wrong with going into the first year not knowing quite what to major in, and taking a class or two that you think might help you decide. Take things one at a time, one thought, one idea, one experience, one conversation. Answers will come.
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Ezra’s Answer

Hello there,

I used to be just like you, always wondering about my future and the path I should take. After high school, I decided to join the military as a stepping stone, a chance to gain some real-world experience while I figured out my true calling. Over time, I discovered a passion for law enforcement and homeland security. Don't worry if you're unsure about your future right now. Remember, it's completely normal. Many people stumble upon their true calling through their hobbies or activities they love doing. So, just give it some time, keep exploring, and you'll find your way!
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Deborah’s Answer

Discovering what to pursue for school often involves a blend of passion and proficiency. For me, understanding what I wanted to do academically stemmed from recognizing my strengths and interests. I gravitated toward subjects where I excelled or found myself deeply engaged. Exploring various fields and noticing where I performed well or felt genuinely enthusiastic helped me narrow down my choices. It's crucial to leverage your strengths and talents as guiding lights while considering different academic paths. Ultimately, aligning what you're good at with what genuinely captivates your interest can lead to a fulfilling educational journey and a career path that feels both rewarding and purposeful.
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