Skip to main content
7 answers
7
Asked 180 views

Whats the best options for bachelors if I am unsure of what kind of doctor I want to be?

I'm curious to what my options are before getting into med school. I have no idea what kind of doctor/surgeon I want to become yet. Thank you!

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

7 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Madison’s Answer

100% you do not need to go into medical school knowing which specialty you want to pursue residency in. This will not be expected of you and truly most schools want students who are open to exploring and learning all of them and ideally then deciding after. It’s not a bad thing to know what you want to do going into med school at all but certainly is NOT an expectation. Therefore any pre-med major or major where you complete the additional pre-med courses is perfectly equally acceptable!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Madison’s Answer

Science majors will cover most pre-med requirement classes but you can major in anything technically. Things like biology, chemistry, physics, exercise physiology would be great science majors
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sylvia’s Answer

Hi Chastity!
Your Specialty in the Medical Field should be based on your passion and interest.
Could you tell me what you have to do? Where are you good at? Studying for some years in school will expose you to and bring out your interests. Your posting in the hospitals will push you to your interests. The medical profession is a service to humanity. There are many Specialties in Medicine. By the time you finish Medical School and then; do your internship and residence, you pick the area that interests you most.
The goal is to thrive in Medical school and graduate with flying colours, every other thing will fall into place.
I wish you all the best in this journey.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Scott’s Answer

Hi Chastity. I think what you are asking is how to maintain a healthy work-life balance. I am not sure if you are in high school or college but if it is high school you have a long time to decide if and what kind of doctor you want to be and I would suggest exploring different areas to see if medicine is where you want to spend your life. If you are in college, you should understand there is no real way to get around the fact that medical school followed by an internship and residency are rigorous and time-consuming so free time is limited. In terms of lifestyle after completing medical school and training, some specialties allow for time away from work and ongoing studies. These include choices such as dermatology, ophthalmology and radiology among others. It is also becoming easier to have a work-life balance in primary care in settings where one is employed. In those setting the doctors only see patients in the office, do not go to the hospital to care for their patients and work an 8 hour day with other doctors taking calls at night. Medicine is changing with the advent of new technology so things may be different in years to come. Good luck.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Karissa’s Answer

Biology, Chemistry or Physics. These subjects are on the MCAT and the test will be difficult if you have a non-science degree. Most major 4-year universities have a pre-med program that will give you all the knowledge you need to score at least a 30 on the MCAT.

Karissa recommends the following next steps:

Check out a MCAT book from the library and see what information will be on the test.
There will be at least one university in your state. Look and see if they have a pre-med program.
Take AP Biology, AP Chemistry and AP Physics in high school.
Take the AP test at the end of the year for Biology, Chemistry and Physics and score a 3 or 4.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Alyssa’s Answer

I encourage you to delve deeper into career exploration once you start college. Try out some typical premed courses and see if the subject matter still sparks your interest. If it does, don't hesitate to visit your college's career services office. Most universities and many four-year colleges offer this service. They can help you gain practical experience by arranging for you to "shadow" doctors or volunteer in a hospital or doctor's office while you're still in school.

It can be beneficial to choose a college or university with a significant number of students pursuing health-related professions. If your fellow students are also aiming for medical school, physical therapy school, physician's assistant school, or planning to earn a master's degree or Ph.D. in biology or a related field, you'll find yourself in good company. You'll be surrounded by peers who share your interests and are studying similar subjects.

Such colleges are also likely to offer the right coursework to help you ace the MCAT (Medical College Admissions Test). So, dive in, explore, and let your passion for medicine guide you towards a fulfilling career.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rita’s Answer

I would not worry about the major in college. Most pre med students are science majors. After going to medical school, it did not make me a better doctor.

I think pick a field that you enjoy. The science majors have the benefit in that the first 6 months of medical school may be a little easier but after that, it really doesn't matter.
0