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What is the extent of math I would need to know for a technology related job?

I know that it probably would vary significantly depending on which job it is exactly, but I just would like an idea of the extent of math I would need to be doing on a regular basis while working in the future. I am in 10th grade and wondering what classes would be good for me to take to prepare myself for a career reated to technology, I have already signed up for multiple tech related classes, but I would like to know what math classes would be a good idea for me to get into because I heard that math is used a bit in these types of jobs.

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John’s Answer

If your High School provides courses in Statistics or any technical field, it's beneficial to enroll in them. Gaining proficiency in managing large volumes of data through Excel is a valuable skill. If you're considering more technically demanding college majors such as engineering, it's essential to take advanced math courses like calculus while in High School. For a well-rounded life experience, it's also advantageous to have knowledge in accounting.
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Ciara-Beth’s Answer

Based on my experience, and like you said, it really depends on what kind of job you're interested in. At the moment I'm doing a lot of work around user-centred design and user experience, so statistics has been a really useful skill for me to have. Most of the topics I was learning about in college definitely centred around mathematical concepts (think discrete mathematics, logic, algorithms etc.) however I think it's really worth knowing that I really struggled with math since I was a really small kid, and programming and computer science made it all seem so much easier to understand.

Admittedly, struggling to understand linear algebra and linear functions did cause me to struggle with my machine learning classes slightly in college, however it wasn't impossible to catch up and do well in that class. I had a class about Systems Organisation, which revolved heavily around logic, and it was one of my favourite classes. I had a lot of classes about object oriented programming and python, which again I needed a good understanding of logic and algorithms, but again, it was much easier for me personally to understand these concepts in the context of computer science.

I hope this helps!
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Carlos’s Answer

Hello! The level of knowledge you will need in a full-time role will all depend on what aspect of the technology industry you are interested in. The Tech environment is very diverse and ranges from roles in product management to data analysts. In various roles, you will work with data, work to answer difficult questions, and collaborate with a team that can hopefully help with any of those shortfalls you may have with experience based knowledge. Math is all-around, the important thing to remember is your passion and drive to "get you hands dirty" dive deep into the questions and requests being raised to then be able to deliver results.
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Gina’s Answer

Hi Adrian!

For a solid foundation in the tech field, I suggest you consider taking math classes like statistics and algebra, as well as any courses that focus on logic. While technology classes are beneficial, I would also encourage you to explore coding classes if they're available at your school. The skills you'll acquire from learning to code will enable you to dissect problems into smaller, more manageable pieces, thereby enhancing your problem-solving abilities.

Remember, you don't have to be a math whiz to excel in technology. However, a strong foundation in algebra can be quite advantageous. Seek out classes that push your boundaries and cultivate your problem-solving skills. When I was in your shoes, I found immense value in physics, calculus, and coding classes. While they might not seem directly related to tech, they certainly equip you with the necessary tools for success.
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Robert’s Answer

Hello Adrian!

Mathematics plays a pivotal role in shaping your professional journey post-education. Regardless of your chosen field of study or career path, you'll encounter mathematical challenges in every business sphere. Basic mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, division, and exponents, are likely to constitute around 70% of the math you'll use daily. As a Financial Analyst, my advice stems from my experience in the Finance/Accounting sector after high school.

In my profession, I frequently deal with trend analysis reports, which are akin to the slope formula (y=mx+b), but with additional variables. Sometimes, I encounter problems where I need to identify the variables instead of them being pre-defined. To equip yourself for the business world, the tools you master are more critical than your initial math proficiency. Microsoft Excel is the bedrock of business operations, likely accounting for 90% of your entry-level duties.

In summary, if you're uncertain about your mathematical skills for a business career, invest heavily in mastering EXCEL.

Best of luck for your future endeavors!

Robert recommends the following next steps:

There are many opportunities to take a class/test to certify your skill in Excel, and this will put you a cut above your peers. Linkedin has it's own course and proficiency test you can include in your resume.
After getting classes or certifications, or even while in progress, type "=" in the formula box and try to make it a goal to understand how every formula works and how it can be implemented in different situations.
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Camila’s Answer

Hi Adrian!

As you have said, how much math you use will depend on your specific position. Regardless, having a good understanding of math is always important. Although you won't be using calculus day-to-day, having an understanding of the important principles and concepts will help. You won't be doing pure math, but when coding or manipulating lots of data, understanding principles of math helps you understand and problem solve. Hopefully this helps!

Upskilling
Whether you’re starting college or finishing up your studies, Access Your Potential Career Readiness and Digital Skills curricula are available to help you grow and discover what you want for your career. http://accessyourpotential.pwc.com/.
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Alexa’s Answer

Hi. I would say 90% of what you learn is on the job. I am a financial analyst at a tech company and I majored in Finance in college. I rarely relate back to my courses taken in college and more so leverage my network at work to learn.
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Melanie’s Answer

Hello! The choice of subjects can often hinge on the specific prerequisites of the college, but I would strongly suggest considering statistics, algebra, and calculus, and perhaps even geometry. These subjects can pave the way for a robust IT program in college. As you embark on your college journey, you might instantly pinpoint the exact IT program that piques your interest. However, if you ever find yourself drawn towards IT applications in fields like robotics or aerospace, rest assured, these subjects will equip you with a solid base for your college syllabus. So, go ahead and embrace these subjects - they'll be your stepping stones to success in the IT world!
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