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What should I major in if I would like to become a nurse/doctor?

are there specific things I should be doing in high school or college that will lead me closer to my goal?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Madiha’s Answer

If you're interested in becoming a nurse or a doctor, there are several paths you can take in terms of your major and academic pursuits. Here are some considerations:

Major in Nursing: If you want to become a nurse, majoring in Nursing is a direct path. Many universities offer Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs that prepare students for careers as registered nurses (RNs).

Major in Pre-Med or a Related Field: If you aspire to become a doctor, you can major in a pre-medical field such as Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, or Neuroscience. These majors provide a strong foundation in the sciences, which is essential for medical school admissions and success in medical school coursework.

Consider Other Health-related Majors: There are other health-related majors you can pursue that may also prepare you for a career in medicine or nursing, such as Health Sciences, Public Health, or Medical Laboratory Science.

Focus on Academics: Regardless of your major, focus on maintaining a high GPA and taking challenging courses in high school and college, especially in science and math subjects. Medical and nursing schools typically look for candidates with strong academic records.

Gain Clinical Experience: Seek out opportunities to gain clinical experience, such as volunteering at hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes. This will give you firsthand exposure to the healthcare field and help you determine if nursing or medicine is the right career path for you.

Extracurricular Activities: Participate in extracurricular activities related to healthcare or community service. This could include joining pre-medical or pre-nursing clubs, volunteering with organizations that focus on healthcare, or participating in medical mission trips.

Build Strong Relationships with Mentors: Seek out mentors, such as teachers, advisors, or healthcare professionals, who can provide guidance and support as you pursue your career goals. They can offer valuable advice, help you navigate the admissions process, and provide insight into the healthcare field.

Prepare for Standardized Tests: Depending on your career goals, you may need to take standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT for undergraduate admissions, as well as the MCAT (Medical College Admission Test) for medical school admissions or the NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses) for nursing licensure.

Overall, pursuing a career in nursing or medicine requires dedication, hard work, and a strong commitment to serving others. By focusing on your academics, gaining relevant experience, and actively pursuing opportunities to learn and grow, you can take significant steps toward achieving your goal of becoming a nurse or doctor.
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Aisha’s Answer

Hi John Xavier,

If you're interested in becoming a nurse or doctor, there are several majors and steps you can take in high school and college to prepare for these careers.

**Majors for Nursing:**

1. **Nursing**: This is the most direct route. Many colleges offer Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs where you can earn your degree and become a registered nurse (RN). Additionally, there are Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) programs which can also lead to becoming an RN.

2. **Pre-Nursing**: Some colleges offer pre-nursing programs or tracks designed to prepare students for admission into nursing programs. These programs often include prerequisites such as biology, chemistry, anatomy, and psychology.

**Majors for Medicine:**

1. **Biology or Biological Sciences**: A major in biology provides a strong foundation in the sciences, which is essential for medical school. It covers subjects such as anatomy, physiology, genetics, and microbiology.

2. **Biochemistry**: This major combines biology and chemistry and provides a deeper understanding of biochemical processes, which are relevant to medicine.

3. **Chemistry**: A major in chemistry provides a solid foundation in the chemical sciences, which is important for understanding the biochemical processes in the human body.

**Steps to Take in High School and College:**

1. **Take Science and Math Courses**: In high school, take courses in biology, chemistry, physics, and math. These courses will provide a strong foundation for college-level science courses and are necessary for admission to nursing and medical programs.

2. **Get Involved in Healthcare-related Activities**: Volunteer or work in healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes. This will give you valuable experience and insight into the healthcare field.

3. **Maintain a High GPA**: Nursing and medical programs are competitive, so it's important to maintain a high GPA in high school and college.

4. **Participate in Extracurricular Activities**: Join clubs or organizations related to healthcare or science, such as pre-med clubs or science clubs. These activities can demonstrate your commitment to the field and provide opportunities for leadership and teamwork.

5. **Prepare for Standardized Tests**: Nursing programs may require the TEAS (Test of Essential Academic Skills) exam, while medical programs require the MCAT (Medical College Admission Test). Prepare for these exams by taking relevant coursework and studying diligently.

6. **Gain Clinical Experience**: In college, seek out opportunities for clinical experience, such as internships or shadowing programs. This will give you firsthand exposure to patient care and healthcare environments.

By pursuing relevant majors, taking the necessary coursework, and gaining relevant experience, you can position yourself for success in nursing or medical school and ultimately achieve your goal of becoming a nurse or doctor.
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Rose’s Answer

Indeed, transitioning from a paramedic to a Registered Nurse (RN) is not only possible, but your paramedic experience can also serve as a significant advantage during this transition. Here's why:

Common Skills and Knowledge: Both paramedics and nurses operate on a shared understanding of patient evaluation, basic medical assistance, and emergency procedures. This shared knowledge gives you an upper hand in grasping fundamental nursing concepts.
Practical Experience: As a paramedic, you acquire crucial hands-on experience by working with patients in dynamic, pre-hospital environments. These critical thinking and patient care skills will be highly beneficial in the nursing profession.
Steps to Transition:

There are two primary routes to transition from a paramedic to an RN:

Paramedic-to-RN Bridge Programs: Numerous colleges and universities provide fast-track programs specifically designed for paramedics aspiring to become RNs. These programs, usually completed in 12-18 months, focus on imparting knowledge and skills not covered in paramedic training, such as nursing theory, medication administration, and chronic disease management.
Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Programs: Alternatively, you can join a conventional BSN program with other students who do not have a paramedic background. Although this route may take longer (typically 4 years), it provides a more comprehensive educational foundation in nursing.
Advantages of a BSN for Paramedics:

While both paths lead to RN licensure, a BSN program offers certain benefits:

Expanded Job Opportunities: Hospitals are increasingly favoring BSN holders, opening up more career progression opportunities and leadership roles in nursing.
Higher Salary Potential: Nurses with a BSN generally earn higher salaries compared to those with an ADN.
To help you get started, here are some useful resources:

National Council of State Boards of Nursing (https://www.ncsbn.org/)
American Nurses Association (https://www.nursingworld.org/)
Remember, your paramedic experience can serve as a powerful launchpad towards becoming an RN. Make sure to consider your timeline, budget, and career objectives when selecting the right path for you.
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Martin’s Answer

Excellent query! Absolutely, a strong foundation in the sciences, mathematics, and even some computing skills will be incredibly beneficial. If you opt for nursing, you'll have certain fundamental subjects laid out for you, and then lean to a special emphasis on nursing. If you're leaning towards medical school, while the sciences, math, and computing are vital, it's equally important to explore other subjects that you're passionate about, regardless of how unrelated they might seem. Ultimately, while academics are crucial, your personal interests that contribute to your well-rounded personality are just as significant. So, go ahead and embrace your diverse interests!
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Brad’s Answer

Biology is the typical major of a pre-med student. I think it’s self explanatory, however I believe any major may take the MCAT exams when applying to med school. Nursing on the other hand is qualified through an associates degree or bachelors degree , and your major would be declared as Nursing. This will require chemistry, algebra, and biology pre requisites as a bare minimum.
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Melissa’s Answer

To embark on the rewarding journey of becoming a nurse or doctor, you'll need to earn a degree in a related field. This starts with selecting a major that suits your career path, such as a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BS) for those aspiring to be nurses, or a pre-med or related field like Biology or Chemistry for future doctors.

Your journey begins in high school, where you'll lay a solid foundation by taking science courses, honing your math skills, and gaining hands-on experience through volunteering in healthcare settings.

As you transition into college, you'll want to choose a school renowned for its strong nursing or pre-med programs. Here, you'll need to strive for academic excellence to maintain a high GPA, while also engaging in extracurricular activities that enrich your learning experience.

Extracurricular activities can range from joining clubs or organizations, seeking out research opportunities, to earning certifications in CPR or other healthcare-related areas.

By embracing these steps, you're setting yourself up for success. Your dedication, hard work, and the guidance from mentors or advisors will pave the way towards achieving your dream of becoming a healthcare professional. So, get ready to embark on this exciting journey and make a difference in the world!
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Patrick’s Answer

John, I appreciate your curiosity. Drawing from the wisdom of my aunt and uncle, who are experienced nurses who served in the Army as well as privately, I have some valuable advice to help guide you on your journey to becoming a nurse.

The first step is to obtain a nursing education. You can choose to earn a diploma, an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), or a Bachelor's Degree in Nursing (BSN). The BSN program provides a more comprehensive education and paves the way for numerous career opportunities. After finishing your studies, you'll need to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to secure your RN license. It's important to note that each state has its own licensing requirements, so be sure to familiarize yourself with them.

They also underscored the value of gaining real-world experience through clinical rotations during your nursing program. This practical exposure is key to refining your skills. My uncle, who is an anesthesiologist, pointed out that specializing in areas like pediatrics or critical care is not mandatory, but it can greatly enhance your career prospects.

In addition, they emphasized the need for strong interpersonal skills such as communication, empathy, critical thinking, and flexibility. These skills are vital for delivering top-notch patient care.

Continuing education is another area you should concentrate on, as per my aunt's advice. It's important to stay abreast of the latest developments in this rapidly changing field. Many nurses pursue higher degrees or certifications to remain up-to-date.

Finally, they stressed the significance of being aware of the legal and ethical dimensions of healthcare, including patient confidentiality and adherence to ethical guidelines.

As a student myself, I suggest consulting with your academic advisors, exploring accredited nursing programs, and understanding the licensing requirements specific to your state. Both my aunt and uncle agreed that nursing is a rewarding career that demands commitment, continuous learning, and a heartfelt desire to deliver compassionate care.
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Rian’s Answer

Hi John,
A great thing to do is to volunteer at a local hospital! Being able to witness doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals in action will help give you a better idea of what you'd like to do. Not only that, but by speaking to them you can gain unique insights about the field and the different things each position has to offer. These experiences will not only be able to guide your decision making, but you can also talk about them as you get ready to apply for whichever program you wish to do.

Best of luck!
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Joseph’s Answer

You can be reviewing your options as becoming a health care provider, Nurse or other has many educational and financial benefits. My daughter went to a Certificate program then passed the test to become an RN. Also, there are financial programs that provide assistance for $$ because it is a Healthcare job.

These schools offer online course studies.
Penn State
Drexel
UofPenn

Nurse Certificate programs:

https://www.educationconnection.com/lps/medical-assistant?trackid=68881703-0169-4937-8877-c7d47ae9b803&Categories=25&SubCategories=655,657&key=go_medical+assistant+certification+online&v=google&a=&c=medical+assisting&cat=medical+assistant+certification+online&mt=search&ad=463012805747&est=medical%20assistant%20certification%20online&emt=b&device=c&device=&target=kwd-618728106&gad_source=1&gclid=CjwKCAiAopuvBhBCEiwAm8jaMe3Aaetn4ppNxqe_Me0c9-FfEiZdQIjXaK6l9EaVte8Xntv5qs_90hoCVJUQAvD_BwE
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