Skip to main content
7 answers
8
Updated 617 views

How to be doctor?

How to be doctor?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

7 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Martin’s Answer

Ryan, you've asked a fantastic question that many have sought to answer, and it's not a simple one. There's a vast amount of information out there trying to provide a clear path. However, the basic steps involve earning a college degree, gaining admission into a medical school, and then finishing a residency in your chosen specialty. This journey may be long, but if you genuinely love this career path, it's incredibly fulfilling not just for you, but also for the community you serve.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Scott’s Answer

Hi Ryan! I am an internist (a general medical doctor for adults) so I know about the process. In general, after graduating HS it takes 4 years of college to get a bachelor's degree, followed by 4 years of medical school and then at least 3 years of post-medical school training depending on what kind of doctor you want to be. To get into a medical school it is important that you maintain excellent grades and participate in a variety of meaningful activities outside of academics to improve your chances of being accepted. I do not know what grade you are in but I feel those varied experiences you go through will not only help you work towards your goal of becoming a doctor( in my opinion a very admirable and worthy goal as are all the helping professions) but you may also be surprised to find yourself passionate about some other pursuits. Good luck in your pursuits!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Waseem’s Answer

Hi Ryan it is a long process for becoming a doctor. I don't know what stage you are. First you have to get admission in a medical school after finishing higher secondary level followed by the residency program for 4 years and fellowship in the respective fields in which you are interested.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Junied’s Answer

Becoming a doctor is a challenging but rewarding journey that requires dedication, hard work, and perseverance. Here are the general steps to become a doctor:

Complete Pre-Medical Education: Obtain a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. While there is no specific major required for medical school, most pre-medical students choose majors in biology, chemistry, biochemistry, or related fields. It's essential to maintain a high GPA and excel in science courses.

Take the MCAT (Medical College Admission Test): The MCAT is a standardized exam that assesses knowledge of natural, behavioral, and social science concepts and critical thinking skills. Prepare thoroughly for the MCAT exam, as it plays a significant role in medical school admissions.

Apply to Medical School: Research medical schools and their admission requirements. Complete the necessary applications, including submitting transcripts, letters of recommendation, and personal statements. Be prepared for the rigorous application process, which may include interviews.

Attend Medical School: Once accepted, complete four years of medical school to earn a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree. The first two years typically focus on classroom and laboratory coursework covering basic medical sciences and clinical skills. The last two years involve clinical rotations in various specialties, providing hands-on experience in patient care.

Pass Licensing Exams: After graduating from medical school, pass the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) for MDs or the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination (COMLEX-USA) for DOs. These exams assess the knowledge and skills necessary to practice medicine safely.

Complete Residency Training: Residency training is a period of supervised clinical practice in a specific medical specialty. Residencies typically last three to seven years, depending on the specialty chosen. During residency, doctors gain advanced training and experience in their chosen field.

Obtain State Licensure: After completing residency training, obtain a medical license to practice medicine in the state where you plan to work. Licensure requirements vary by state but generally involve passing licensing exams and meeting other state-specific requirements.

Optional Fellowship Training: Some doctors choose to pursue additional fellowship training to further specialize in a specific area of medicine. Fellowships typically last one to three years and provide advanced training and expertise in subspecialty areas.

Continuing Medical Education: Throughout your career, engage in continuing medical education (CME) activities to stay current with medical advancements, maintain licensure, and enhance your skills and knowledge.

Practice Medicine: Once licensed and trained, begin practicing medicine in your chosen specialty. This may involve working in hospitals, clinics, private practices, research institutions, or academic settings, depending on your career goals and interests.

Remember that the journey to becoming a doctor requires dedication, resilience, and a genuine desire to help others. It's a lifelong commitment to learning and serving patients, but it can also be incredibly fulfilling and rewarding.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Aisha’s Answer

Hello Ryan,

Embarking on a journey to become a doctor demands several stages, unwavering commitment, and numerous years of education and practical training. Here's a simplified, yet detailed rundown of the process:

1. **Undertake Pre-Medical Education**: Earn a bachelor's degree, focusing on science subjects such as biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. It's crucial to keep your GPA high and get involved in extracurricular activities, particularly those related to healthcare or community service.

2. **Clear the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)**: You need to prepare for and pass the MCAT exam, which tests your understanding of natural sciences, as well as your critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. Your score on this test plays a significant role in your acceptance into medical school.

3. **Enroll in Medical School**: Join and complete a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) program at a recognized medical school. This usually takes four years and combines classroom teaching, lab work, and clinical rotations.

4. **Finish Residency Training**: After medical school, you'll need to undertake a residency program in your chosen specialty. This can last between three to seven years, depending on the specialty, and offers practical experience under the guidance of seasoned physicians.

5. **Acquire Medical Licensure**: To legally practice medicine, you must secure a medical license from the state where you intend to work. The requirements for licensure differ by state but generally involve passing the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) or the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination (COMLEX).

6. **Optional Fellowship Training**: Some doctors opt for additional fellowship training in a particular subspecialty within their field. This offers advanced training and expertise in areas like pediatric surgery, oncology, or cardiology.

7. **Keep Up with Continuing Education and Certification**: To stay up-to-date in your field, engage in continuing medical education (CME) activities and maintain board certification, if applicable. Board certification showcases your expertise and dedication to delivering top-notch patient care.

The path to becoming a doctor demands determination, resilience, and a sincere desire to aid others. Although it's a demanding journey, it's also incredibly rewarding, enabling you to positively influence patients' lives and contribute to the medical field.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rita’s Answer

I think you have the answer above. I'll also leave a summary:
1. 4 years of high school
2. 4 years of college
3. 4 years of medical school
4. 3-multiple years of internship and residency

This is a long journey and it's not easy. What I recommend everyone interested in medicine do is to act as a scribe. You get paid and they will train you. You basically act like a secretary for the doctors. The pay may not be high but what is most important is that you get the experience, you interact with doctors, and you learn the language of medicine. When I had students in my clinic as medical students, the ones that had scribed were so much sharper. This will be helpful during medical school. When you are learning the language and what is important, you are ahead of the other students.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kess’s Answer

Hello, Ryan!

Fantastic question!
Becoming a doctor in the US can seem like a complicated journey. The previous answers are fantastic, this is just a bit more information.

1. Complete high school and make sure to relish your summer break!

2. Begin exploring which college you would like to attend for your bachelor's degree. Medical schools generally accept any degree as long as you've fulfilled the prerequisite courses. Don't forget to indulge in some subjects that truly interest you! Medical schools appreciate applicants who are diverse and have interests beyond medicine, not just those who've checked the necessary boxes.
(I hold a bachelor's degree in biomedical science with minors in chemistry and sociology, and my med school buddies have degrees in English, Russian history, and Psychology.)

3. Take as many courses as possible at your local community college to save on costs (ensure they're transferable to a university though)! Apply for financial aid via FAFSA. Some community colleges even offer programs that can help you transition to a nearby university.

4. Aim for and secure at least a bachelor's degree. Some individuals choose to pursue a Master's degree, such as in Public Health, but it's not mandatory.

5. Gear up for and take the MCAT (Medical College Admissions Test). Your college might be able to assist you with test preparation! This is usually done after the junior or senior year of college.

6. Get ready for and apply to medical schools [both MD (Medical Doctor) and DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) pathways lead to becoming a physician].

7. Complete 4 years of medical school (the first 2 years consist of textbook learning, while the last two years involve clinical rotations). Licensing exams are taken after the 2nd and 3rd years of medical school, with a final one during residency.

8. Apply for and participate in a residency program - this involves a few more years of training depending on your chosen specialty. (Take your 3rd major exam here.) On the bright side, residency is a paid position. Keep in mind, that you may change your mind on what specialty you want to pursue, and that's ok!


Doctor's offices and hospitals have multiple employees and volunteers. You might consider working in one before medical school for experience and exposure to different specialties.

BEST OF LUCK! BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, YOU'VE GOT THIS!!!
0