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Wy do i have to go to college?

How much money do I have to save before college?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Maria the average in-state student cost for attending a public 4-year institution is $26,000 per each academic year. This is why s many other students like are considering college alternatives, including time investment, personal interests and cost. You might find that college degree programs don’t match your career interests or skills. Earning a college degree also usually takes a minimum of two years for associate’s degrees and four years for bachelor’s degrees. College alternatives make it possible to get started on your career much sooner.

1.) TRADE SCHOOLS
Trade schools provide you with in-depth knowledge of skills needed for particular careers or trades. For example, you might go to a culinary school to become a chef or join a vocational education program to become a stylist. Other vocational education and trade school options include auto, medical, dental, welding, firefighting, law enforcement, animal care and technology. This kind of college alternative can provide a more straightforward path to a fulfilling career, since you won’t be taking electives or other classes unrelated to your career path.

2.) APPRENTICESHIP
You don’t need a college degree for some jobs, such as becoming an electrician or plumber. These jobs require you to develop particular skills and learn how to do specific tasks expertly to reduce the risk of damage or injuries. With these kinds of jobs, you can gain this knowledge as an apprentice. Whether you’re interested in electrical work, plumbing work, masonry, carpentry or similar specialties, an apprenticeship provides you with valuable experience on the job. You can expect to get the skills and training you’ll need for this kind of work while under the guidance of an experienced professional.

3.) ENTREPRENEUR
If you have a business idea or if you’re interested in turning a hobby into a career, you might be at the beginning of your entrepreneurial journey. By putting your skills to use creating and providing products or services to others, you can become your own boss. Formal education isn’t required to be an entrepreneur, but keep in mind that basic skills in business and marketing can help—a foundational understanding in these areas will give you a better chance at success. Getting on Etsy or eBay may be an easy entry point for making sales.

4.) MILITARY
The military offers a chance to learn a wide range of skills, travel to multiple locations, and serve your country. When you join the military, you’ll have access to training programs for various jobs, such as engineering, aviation, human resources and more. Serving in the military also provides you with opportunities to develop skills that many employers look for, including teamwork. Keep in mind that you might be able to get college credits for your military experience if you decide to go to a college or university. Service members can also get help covering college costs.
Thank you comment icon Thank You Marlon. Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Doc Frick
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Paul’s Answer

I think in the current environment, we go to college to obtain greater technical and job skills. Technology is changing and college helps us stay up to date with the skills that will be needed in the future.
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Thomas’s Answer

Hey!

There is a common misconception that you HAVE to go to college. College is very very helpful if you 1. Don't know what you want to do and want to use college to find yourself and your passion, 2. If you know exactly what you want to do and know it needs a college degree, or 3. if you know what you want to do and it doesn't require a degree but it does help to have one.

If you would rather do something that would require you to go to trade school or get and apprenticeship, by all means do that instead! There's also absolutely no rule that says you can't try some career options without a degree before going back to get one. Your path is your own and you get to say what you should and shouldn't do for your career and life.

If I can give my two cents however, I think college (or something similar) is very important. I'm an audio production and music major- nothing I'm doing in school requires a degree. But the experience I have gotten in school I wouldn't trade for the world. Life long friends, really really cool opportunities, and a lot of good experiences that I will carry into my career.

As for your question about money- how much you have to save depends on a few things. Where are you going to school? If you go to a school in your state, it will probably be cheaper than going to a school out of state. Secondly, financial aid- how much are you able to get in financial aid? I'm not saying to rely on loans, but this can be really helpful for budgeting and deciding how much to save. I think the first step should be finding schools you would be interested in going to and looking up how much yearly tuition is. Base your decision on where to go on if you enjoy the campus, the atmosphere, and affordability.

I really hope this helps!
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Aisha’s Answer

Hi Maria,

Going to college is a personal decision, and the reasons for pursuing higher education can vary greatly from one individual to another. Here are some common reasons why people choose to attend college:

1. **Career Opportunities**: Many professions require a college degree as a minimum qualification. Higher education can open up more career opportunities and increase earning potential in the long run.

2. **Skill Development**: College provides opportunities for students to develop critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills, which are valuable in both professional and personal contexts.

3. **Personal Growth**: College offers a chance for personal growth and exploration. It exposes students to new ideas, cultures, and experiences, helping them develop independence, self-awareness, and resilience.

4. **Networking**: College provides a platform for building a professional network, which can be beneficial for future career opportunities. Interacting with peers, professors, and alumni can open doors to internships, job placements, and mentorship.

5. **Specialized Knowledge**: Higher education allows students to delve deeper into specific fields of interest and gain specialized knowledge that can be applied in their chosen career paths.

As for saving money for college, the amount you'll need to save depends on various factors, including the cost of tuition, room and board, books, and other expenses, as well as any financial aid or scholarships you may receive. Here are some steps to consider:

1. **Research Costs**: Research the costs of attending the colleges or universities you're interested in, including tuition, fees, housing, and other expenses. This will give you an idea of how much you'll need to save.

2. **Create a Budget**: Calculate how much you'll need to save each month to reach your college savings goal. Consider setting up a dedicated savings account specifically for college expenses.

3. **Explore Financial Aid**: Look into scholarships, grants, and other forms of financial aid that may be available to you. Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine your eligibility for federal aid, as well as any state or institutional aid programs.

4. **Consider College Savings Plans**: Explore options like 529 college savings plans, which offer tax-advantaged savings for education expenses. These plans can help you save and invest money for college over time.

5. **Start Early**: The earlier you start saving for college, the more time your money has to grow. Even small contributions can add up over time, so start saving as soon as possible.

Ultimately, the amount you'll need to save for college and the decision to attend college are highly personal choices that depend on your individual goals, circumstances, and preferences. It's essential to research your options, create a plan that works for you, and seek guidance from financial aid professionals if needed.
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Shirley’s Answer

The short answer is: you don't have to attend college to become successful.

College has been a traditional path that leads to better paying jobs, so almost everyone recommends it. However, that doesn't mean that college is the only path to success.

As times have changed, trade schools and entrepreneurship are becoming more common.
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Jim’s Answer

Hi Maria,
Going to school or college will help boost your professional credibility. It's a place where you can earn academic validation for a specific industry and also build connections with other individuals and professionals. It will help you find internships where you can explore different opportunities within your interest.
Good luck!
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