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How do I become an mechanical engineer?

Im a guy in High School graduating next year at Kirtland Central High School, A career I would like to try and be is a Mechanical Engineer. One of my favorite classes was Honors Anatomy & Philology class.

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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Sonderick,

It is great to hear of your interest in mechanical engineering. A great foundation for this career is math and science classes. Mechanical engineers also would need a college degree. Mechanical engineering also has many focus areas, so you can pick the area(s) that you find the most interesting. Some examples include: Thermal systems/fluids, Mechanical Structures, Materials, and Automotive design. I personally have a mechanical engineering background and have enjoyed many years as an engineer/engineering leader in the automotive industry. It is an exciting field to go into. Best wishes as you explore your future career options.
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Mark’s Answer

Earning a degree in Mechanical Engineering is indeed a challenging task, but it's absolutely attainable! You'll need to have a strong knack for math, but don't let that deter you. Start by enrolling in a local college to complete your general education courses. This is a smart move that will save you a significant amount of money! Once done, you can transition to a 4-year engineering program at a technical college or university. Remember, there's a fellow known as "the science guy," and guess what? His credentials are rooted in a Mechanical Engineering degree. So, you see, this degree can take you places! Keep pushing, you've got this!
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Sonderick,

Guidelines to Becoming a Mechanical Engineer

To embark on a career as a mechanical engineer, follow these actionable steps:

1. Education:

High School: Begin with relevant high school courses like mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computer science. These will lay a solid groundwork for your engineering studies.
Bachelor’s Degree: Enroll in a mechanical engineering bachelor's degree at an accredited institution. This four-year program includes subjects such as thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and mechanical design.

2. Gain Experience:

Internships: Seek internships or co-op programs during your undergraduate years to acquire hands-on experience. This will not only improve your skills but also make you more appealing to future employers.
Research Opportunities: Participate in mechanical engineering research projects to deepen your understanding and expertise.

3. Obtain Licensure:

Professional Engineer (PE) License: Although not always required, securing a PE license can boost your credibility and expand your job prospects. To get licensed, you generally need a degree from an ABET-accredited program, relevant work experience, and successful completion of the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) and Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) exams.

4. Specialize:

Graduate Studies: If you're interested in advancing your career or specializing in a specific area such as robotics, aerospace, or automotive engineering, think about pursuing a master’s degree or Ph.D. in mechanical engineering.

5. Continuous Learning:

Professional Development: Keep up with the latest developments in the field by attending workshops, seminars, and earning certifications that showcase your expertise.

By diligently following these steps and staying dedicated to your goal of becoming a mechanical engineer, you can create a successful career path in this exciting field.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME): ASME is a respected professional organization that offers valuable resources for budding mechanical engineers, including education requirements, licensure, industry trends, and networking opportunities.

National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE): NSPE provides advice on licensure requirements for engineers in the United States and advocates for high professional standards within the engineering community.

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS): The BLS offers extensive data on the job outlook for mechanical engineers, including job opportunities, salary details, and educational requirements based on national statistics and trends.

These resources were crucial in providing reliable and accurate information on building a career as a mechanical engineer.

Blessings,
JC.
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Fred’s Answer

Generally, you'd go to a four year college and major in mechanical engineering. There may be a professional licensing exam you have to take if you want to work on your own, or you could possibly work under another engineer without it (I'm not sure about this - I am not an engineer).

You can also go on and earn a masters degree in engineering, which could open more doors and offer more opportunities, but that takes longer and costs more money.
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