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How do you choose a career that you can pursue ? when you are undecided about anything in particular ?

I am really undecided about my future I had nothing in particular that I was good at in school so how do you chose a course to take in university ?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Kristina’s Answer

Picking a career when you're not sure what you want can seem tough, but a good place to start is by looking at what you like, what you're good at, and what matters to you. Start off by thinking about the things or subjects that make you happy or keep you interested, even if you didn't ace them at school. You might want to try career quizzes to help you find out what jobs could be a good fit for your personality and abilities. Talking to career advisors, people who work in different jobs, or mentors can be really helpful, as they can give you advice and share their experiences. Lastly, getting some real-world experience through internships, part-time work, or volunteering can give you a better idea of what a job is like and help you make a smarter choice about your future career.
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Bonnie’s Answer

Hello Kayla, don't worry, you're not alone! Many of us have been in the same boat, figuring out our path. It's completely normal to be unsure about your major. In your first year, it's a smart move to focus on basic courses that can be applied to various degrees. As you move into your second year, you'll find more specialized courses that can guide you towards a potential major. Considering a broad field like business could be a great way to keep your options wide open. Remember, you've got this! Good luck on your journey!
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Alyssa’s Answer

It's perfectly okay if you're not certain about what you want to do with your life yet. There's a lot of pressure on young folks to pick a career path even before they step into their first college class. Truth be told, these decisions can be tough for people at any age.

Thinking about what you want to be when you're "all grown up" can bring about stress, confusion, and frustration. But don't let it get to you. Remember, life and college are about more than just job preparation. They're about learning in a multitude of ways, including intellectually, professionally, and personally. Consider opportunities that will reveal your talents, passions, dislikes, and areas where you can grow.

Your interests, ambitions, and career ideas might shift from one year to the next, and that's absolutely okay! You don't have to have it all figured out, because there are countless paths you can explore.
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Shelia’s Answer

There's a world of exciting career opportunities waiting for you, both within and outside the realm of college education. Choosing a career is a significant milestone, and it's crucial to find a path that truly fuels your passion. Identify what motivates you and make sure your choice aligns with those driving forces, not just the expectations of others, unless it genuinely excites you. If you're a fan of practical, hands-on work, there's a wealth of opportunities in both college and vocational school settings. The range of study fields today far surpasses what was available three decades ago. Depending on your interests, you might even consider pursuing an associate degree, which typically takes two years.

Vocational or trade schools provide practical training in a variety of fields such as automotive technology, medical assistance, hairdressing, certified nursing assistance, electronics technology, paralegal studies, and truck driving.

I'm not certain of your current grade level, but I'd recommend exploring any vocational courses your high school might offer.

Wishing you all the best on your journey!
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Richard’s Answer

Your question is difficult, in a way, to answer because many things come into play. This includes your personal desires, what is available to you to pursue, the resources you have available, etc.

As I tell many, think long and hard about what you are passionate about. What is it you would want to do when you wake up every morning. You spend most of your time at work during a day - so you should be pursuing something you want to spend your time doing. That said, is that truly a personal desire so you have the passion to do your very very best, is that career path available to you so you can pursue it, and if you need education and training do you have the means to do that. All those things come into play.

So - let's say you don't have all of the above to pursue your passion right now. You may want to take an alternative path that is something you would not mind doing (though not your ultimate passion) and can do in order to prepare yourself to take your passionate path. There are many roads to get where you want to be - and that's OK.

I was not sure what I wanted to do and had multiple desires. So, I took a path that would help me get to where I wanted to be and joined the US Air Force as an enlisted member. That gave me an alternate route, with structure and pay, to figure out "what I wanted to be when I grew up." Believe it or not - that path provided me a new passion and I ended up staying in the USAF for 27 years. I took advantage of the opportunity within the USAF to get my bachelors degree, 2 masters degrees, and spent my days doing things I would have never imagined doing. Did I ever get to one of my passions (being a lawyer) - no though I was hoping the USAF would get me there. But I found a new passion that was just as good.

So, assess have your passion, evaluate your means, determine your path do success (though you may have to take alternate routes to get there), and enjoy you working life every day.
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Brittanie’s Answer

What you’re facing is quite common. Don’t stress or worry too much right now. If you decide to go to college, the good thing is you can choose ‘Undecided’ for a major.

The first couple of years you’ll take a lot of General Education (Gen Ed) courses anyway. These courses are designed to fulfill a credit, but they also help those who are undecided hone in on something of interest. I’ve seen Gen Ed courses cause people to change their major/field of study because they liked a course so much. Really use the Gen Ed courses to determine what you like and go from there.

You can also seek out some internships (paid if you can) to get some experience doing some things to further determine if it’s something you want to do. A lot of people think internships are reserved for your last few years of school, but they can be done at any time . You just don’t necessarily receive college credit for them until it’s required. BUT, if you have experience you become more appealing to employers.

All the best!
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Grace’s Answer

A good start would be to know what subjects , topics do you enjoy in school. Then try to pursue higher education that focuses on those subjects or topics. Do remember that you do not need to follow the traditional path (i.e. to go to university and get a degree). Life is short so try to focus on pursuing things that you enjoy!
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Darlene’s Answer

The purpose of university is to guide you in discovering the career path you wish to follow. Concentrate on subjects or coursework that captivate your interest. It's perfectly fine to experiment with something and then realize it's not your cup of tea. You might have to go through this process a hundred times before you stumble upon that one class or activity that you're excited to do over and over again. You might be taken aback by what you discover about yourself and the variety of job opportunities out there.

Also, consider what activities you enjoy during your leisure time, not just what you've learned or how you've performed academically. If you get a kick out of building or repairing things, perhaps engineering could be your calling. If you're a bookworm, you might enjoy a career in editing. If spending time with kids brings you joy, teaching could be your destined path. If you're a video game enthusiast, you might want to explore coding to create those games.
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Michelle’s Answer

Great inquiry. I suggest you consider taking up a part-time job or engaging in volunteer work. These experiences can offer a wealth of insights. For instance, volunteering at a veterinary clinic could help you discover whether you enjoy working with animals or can handle the sight of biological fluids. Similarly, working in a restaurant can provide you with a sense of what it's like to interact with various people, operate in a high-energy setting, and juggle multiple tasks. Stay open-minded throughout this journey, even when it gets tough. Every experience is a chance for growth and learning.

During my college years, I aspired to become a Social Worker. To cover my expenses, I took up a part-time job at a bank and realized that I could have a rewarding career and contribute to my community while working at a local branch. Even though I completed my degree, I chose to stay with the bank, and it's been 25 fulfilling years so far!
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