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Which branch of engineering is more math than physics?

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Hello,
I am still trying to figure out which branch of engineering is best for me. I like to do math, but i am not that great at physics. I am ok with chemistry but not a whole lot go it. Could i get a list of which branches would be best for me? If applicable #engineering #math

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Justina’s Answer

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First, congratulations on being good at math! However, being good at math does not necessarily translate into loving engineering and you should love what you do once you have earned your degree. Do you know the difference between science and engineering? Engineers design solutions based upon existing data. Scientist explore in an almost open-ended fashion compared to engineering; they are data gatherers. A chemical engineer will not know as much about chemistry as a chemist - they will learn how to design solutions to chemical problems. A chemists will learn how chemicals form, exist and degrade so they can collect data on and study them.


There are a variety of careers that require math skills including data scientist, programmers, statisticians, applied mathematicians, marketers (e.g.,build consumer models), HVAC, any branch of science that develops assays (e.g., immunology), epidemiologists study mathematical patterns, computer scientists (e.g., researching encryption algorithms). A degree does not prepare you to become an expert - it only teaches you how to think about a particular branch of problems. It seems from your question that you are interested in going into a field that is not flooded with qualified personal to increase your chances of job placement. A growing field that requires math skills and for which there is currently a HUGE shortage is cyber security. There are a number of reasons for this - relatively new government regulations require companies to meet minimum cyber security standards, increasing sophistication of cyber security threats, etc. I have worked in food research, biodefense research, consumer goods research and in the pharmaceutical industry. From my experiences, it seems that the pharma industry has a lot of money and equivalent positions in other industries are not as highly paid as they are in pharma (i.e., another aspect to consider when choosing your career is the industry you will work in - what industry culture fits your personality). Overall, I think you need to ask a different set of questions beginning with what you want and not with want you want to avoid. Don't live your life running away from what you don't like, live your life running towards that which you love!

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Gordon’s Answer

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Hi, suggest mechanical and /or civil engineering (hydraulic maybe)

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