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What are Do's and Don'ts for my LinkedIn account/Resume/Cover Letter?

I am preparing to hunt for Internships and want to catch the companies attention. I could use all the insight possible. #linkedin #resume #public-relations #cover-letters


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Simeon’s Answer

Honestly, cover letters aren't usually necessary. It's main goal is to summarize why you want the job and why the company should want to hire you. It's best to keep these short and to the point. Keep it under two pages in length and make sure it is clean and easy to read. Have other people proof read yours and look at other people's resumes as well to see how it's organized. You might even be able to ask someone if you could reuse their template for your resume. Make sure your contact information is clearly legible near the beginning of the resume as well. You usually want your best experience to be big and bold near the beginning.

Honestly, cover letters aren't usually necessary. It's main goal is to summarize why you want the job and why the company should want to hire you. It's best to keep these short and to the point.

Finally, networking is just as, if not more important, than getting the best resume built possible. The people you know makes the biggest difference in being able to land a good position.

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Sinead’s Answer

Hi Edgar!
First thing for your resume is to make sure it is clearly outlined, with no grammer/spelling errors.
You should give a short intro/bio to who you are outlining why exactly you're interested in this opportunity. Then underneath list any previous working experience you have - bullet pointing your main duties & tasks is really helpful. Including additional information around volunteer activities, any sporting or educational achievements is always a bonus aswel.
Your education will be most relevant so you should highlight the subjects you've studied, including any project work you've done that might be relevant to the internship.
Try and be authentic and show your personality!

Good luck :)

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Fiona’s Answer

A resume is promotion document for yourself.
Things to also note:
- consistency in the presentation is important
- it must be pleasant to read - not too cluttered, not too many words
- make sure to do a grammar check
- write short, succinct but useful descriptions
- what makes you stand out? work experience? volunteering experience? any language skills, other different skills that other people are unlikely to have?
For a cover letter, find out more information about the company, their values etc and in the cover letter clearly state what skills, values, character traits or experience you have which would be relevant to that particular role – why would you be suitable for the role? Make the letter short, succinct and sharp – nothing too long.

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Hanleigh’s Answer

I love LinkedIn because you can easily transfer your resume onto your LinkedIn. First, you will want to include a professional profile photo and a cover photo that really represents your career interests. Your cover photo is one of the first things a person sees when looking at your account. You also a want a good summary. There is a lot of variation on how to write your summary. My personal recommendation is to include briefly what you've done in the past, what your currently doing, and what your future goal is. Your experiences should follow a similar format to your resume. I think any experience like internships, organizational leadership, jobs, and many other positions can be great experiences to include on your resume. Remember, not all of your experiences have to be a traditional job. You also have an opportunity to include any volunteer, awards, and education.

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Milly’s Answer

I found this free webinar (Leveraging LinkedIn: Learn How to be Visible to Employers) to be very helpful with updating my Linked In account. The Link to the archive recording can be found on: https://www.newhorizons.com/resources/webinars/webinar-archives. They also offer free live webinars with experts who can answer questions live. Looks like the next free session is: Effective Job Search Strategy on 3/23 on https://www.newhorizons.com/resources/webinars. Hope this helps!


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Blake’s Answer

Keep them up to date, don't try and be funny in your descriptions, and keep the resume to one page.

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Shiqi’s Answer

Make sure you put details in each section. It might seem like a lot of work but it's the effort of filling out each detail that get people's attention. And you never know, maybe you and an alumni have something in common and they spotted that when they check it! This will help you to build connections at a personal level.

As for Don'ts - don't treat LinkedIn the same as facebook. It's not. LinkedIn is for professionals. Just be a little mindful of what you share on LinkedIn, because this reflects a professional side of you.


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Jo-Ann’s Answer

Hello Edgar - LinkedIn has great resources, as per Milly's sage advice. You can also do a search regarding this subject matter on LinkedIn to discover plenty of do's and don'ts with respect to CVs and cover letters. Be authentic.

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Anil’s Answer

Hey, since Linkedin is not a resume, you can use it to leverage more bullet points than your normal resume. Be sure to list keywords and search terms. Many companies now have teams of sourcerers to search LinkedIn for potential hires.

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Robert (Rob)’s Answer

Edgar -


Be honest and authentic. Try not to use a lot of jargon or buzzwords. Be clear about what you are looking for - e.g. an internship with a large, multi-national PR firm; an internship with a boutique integrated marketing and communications firm. Describe what classes have you taken that may make you a good fit. Identify to which relevant organizations you belong. Talk about roles you may have on campus that are related - even if not directly. For example, do you work on the college newspaper or radio station? Do you work in admissions as a tourguide?


The good news is that most people hiring interns do not expect you to have a fully formed resume. They're looking to see if there's a decent foundation there to make you a good fit for their internship program.


Robert provided some great advice in his response! To build on his advice, we would also add: - Proof-read your resume and LinkedIn profile for any grammatical or spelling errors - Update your resume and LinkedIn profile regularly so that it is always relevant - Be concise, but use specific and action oriented language (for example: instead of saying you "participated in a group project," say "led a team of peers during a school project") zach aronson

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