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What year to most people start work-study programs under an architecture degree?

I want to know if I would be able to reasonably pay for (i.e. half of tuition at average price college) and live off of a work-study program while in college. Also would I be able to do this starting my first year in college (I don't have my AA yet so I would be studying for that my first year).
#work-study #architecture #work #architect #college-advice #tuition #associatesdegree


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Malcom’s Answer

Agreed - Architecture is really hard. The profession requires discipline and pro active action so you are on the right track. If you have a knack for it going into college - get the funding from outside sources such as grants, loans and scholarships. Apply, Apply and Apply yourself.

Work-study can dim your performance in school where it waters down too much focus and learning. Architecture in school is about Performance. It is a show (think eye-candy for the imagination) as much as it is a knowledge gained.

I was pre-med and learned the field from work-study that was so helpful with Mentorship that made synthesizing all the moving parts into frozen spaces and places. University for undergrad does not matter where as long as you excel. Graduate school will be where you shine be choosy.

Start with the busiest and best firm you can find and develop a CAD/Marketing skill that allows you the part-time skills necessary to work part-time in a fulltime business. Sacrifices will be made but the Profession is unlimited in every direction. Picking that direction is what work/study is the best environment as all knowledge is valuable as an Architect.

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Taylor’s Answer

Hi Tatiana,


To clarify first, I did not work under a work-study program during my college career at Prairie View A&M University. However, that does not mean it is not possible to work while attending college. I had many friends who did just that during school. It all depends on your course load and how much you can handle. Most universities require you to be enrolled in a certain amount of hours before qualifying for work-study.


Also, there are other programs that you can research other than work-study to work during school. It is also possible to work on campus, whatever university you decide to attend, should have numerous student worker positions that don't qualify as work-study. However, you are limited to work a certain amount of hours, which is what I did during school.


My recommendation would be to first research what university you want to attend or are attending and see what they can offer you. This would be the best opportunity to also distinguish what program will help you be successful. Also, there are many other outlets to help you pay for school, research those also before making your decision.


Below in the suggested next steps I've listed some other means for you, to research outside of work-study and on-campus student hourly positions.

Taylor recommends the following next steps:

However this step is dreaded but Student Loans are also a possibility
Private Scholarships, from Non-profits or organizers
Grants
State Scholarships
School Scholarships

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Malcom’s Answer

Agreed - Architecture is really hard. The profession requires discipline and pro active action so you are on the right track. If you have a knack for it going into college - get the funding from outside sources such as grants, loans and scholarships. Apply, Apply and Apply yourself.

Work-study can dim your performance in school where it waters down too much focus and learning. Architecture in school is about Performance. It is a show (think eye-candy for the imagination) as much as it is a knowledge gained.

I was pre-med and learned the field from work-study that was so helpful with Mentorship that made synthesizing all the moving parts into frozen spaces and places. University for undergrad does not matter where as long as you excel. Graduate school will be where you shine be choosy.

Start with the busiest and best firm you can find and develop a CAD/Marketing skill that allows you the part-time skills necessary to work part-time in a fulltime business. Sacrifices will be made but the Profession is unlimited in every direction. Picking that direction is what work/study is the best environment as all knowledge is valuable as an Architect.

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Andrika’s Answer

Actually if i can share my experience, I started to work ( let say take some jobs related with my field study) before I graduated as junior architect or draftsman freelancer. Architecture is really tough major study. Most student struggle hard during studying, but this study give you a lot of opportunity if you learn seriously and explore your capabilities.


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