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Are there jobs in the Hospitality Management field that don't require working weekends?

I have worked in the Hospitality field for many years. However, the majority of my time worked has taken place on the weekends. I know that I want to have a family, and I don't want to be working on weekends. #family #hospitality #hospitality-management #undecided #need-this-scholarship #broke #independently-funding-my-education #help

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Amanda’s Answer

Hey Julia,

If you enjoy analysing data, marketing and the hospitality industry, I would recommend for you to try out a role in revenue management. This aim of this position is to increase the overall revenue of the property that you're working at by either increasing room rate or occupancy rate. Since each night the room is unfilled is lost revenue, this role will have to forecast trends in order to get them filled, and work with the marketing team to come up with delights/offers as well as working with the sales team to ensure that group/corporate bookings are in good terms.

Personally, I was in this role for about a year and truly enjoyed the experience. My working hours are 9-6, but do expect calls during the weekend as the front desk/call center might be calling you up to check on rates/ongoing offers that they require immediate answers to respond to customers.

All the best!
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Ajay’s Answer

Julia,


It is the fact that when the world go on vacation, hospitality go to work. I started my first job in hospitality as a Front Desk Agent. I was an agent for 2 months and I took an opportunity with Motel 6 as a Relief Manager and worked about a year. I received an invitation from my former employer to join as an Assistant General Manager and knowing that company's good reputation, I jumped right on.


I was AGM for 7 months and I was promoted to General Manager of another hotel in the company. I knew, <span style="color: rgb(67, 58, 83); background-color: transparent;">I am recognized for my hard and smart work in that short period of time.</span>It wasn't if I would be promoted, it was when?


This did not completely eliminated weekend work but definitely put me in a position, where I can have the schedules that will fit my personal needs.


I must admit when it comes to raising children, I will thank my wife and our 25 years of commitment together.

See keeping stability at home helps ease up work and we all grow feeling socially secured and don't have to rely on social security.


Thinking of just some job titles in hospitality industry that does not (mostly) require working weekends, here are a few.


General Manager

Area Supervisor

Sales & Marketing Manager or Director

Revenue Manager

Quality Assurance Personnel

Operational Support

Part Time Employees (May be able to create pre-hire condition)

Accounting & Finance

and many others that may not be titled exactly as above.


I encourage you to find your niche and explore options. Please bear in mind it is impervious to gather experience in weekend work before your employer will trust you with bigger responsibilities.


It is always best to discuss with the family and have plan. It is also very important to be in same employment for a reasonably longer period of time.


Best wishes,

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Melanie’s Answer

Hi Julia,

I can definitely relate to you. In high school I joined a program that was "International Hospitality and Tourism Academy." Then I went to college for a degree in hospitality management and I thought that I knew that I wanted to work at a hotel, or in the Industry forever.

Then I got a job at the W Hotel, my dream job, and quickly learned that I did not like working weekends, or having to fight really hard to get days off, and missing so many family weddings/baby showers/ holidays/ etc. Then I learned that I can do hospitality jobs at tech companies/ office jobs.

I became a catering manager at Ernst and Young, I was still doing hospitality driven work, but I got to work 8-5 M-Friday. I loved this job very much. I was making an impact on important meetings, and it felt great.

After this job, I became a Guest Services Ambassador at Salesforce. This job was also considered hospitality. I have since been promoted to a different position at Salesforce that is not in hospitality, and I've never been happier.

If you want to stay in hospitality and have weekends off, the HR roles, and sales manager jobs are usually Monday-Friday, but there are other jobs outside of the industry as well :)
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Rachel’s Answer

You will need to focus on stress and time management. In order to manage stress you have to manage your time wisely. <span style="background-color: transparent;">You have to set a routine for yourself and stick to it for the most part. Once you get into the groove of a routine it will be much easier for you to manage your time and have enough time for everything you need to do (including relaxing). Make yourself to-do lists on a weekly basis, use Google calendar or a planner to keep track of events, deadlines, and due dates. In addition to setting a routine and sticking to it, plan out relaxing activities into your day. Or set aside a time, after everything is done for the day, that you can have "me" time. I have also personally found it essential to not only find time for myself but also make use of that time in a way that is best for me and my holistic wellness. I have found the HeadSpace app to be an essential tool in helping me relax and generally feel more relaxed throughout the day, Guided meditation, even if you have a busy schedule, will make you feel more at ease and relaxed throughout the day as a whole (not just when you have the time to relax and focus on that "me" time).</span>

<span style="background-color: transparent;">Set a routine.Use Google Calendar.Set aside Me TimeWrite weekly to-do lists and use a planner.Find a peaceful and restful activity that will help you feel relaxed.</span>



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Kim’s Answer

Julia,

Hi! I'd like to answer a different question than the one you asked. Is it possible to raise a family while working shiftwork/weekends? The answer is a definite "yes!" I did it for 18 years.


It is not easy. It works best with a 2-parent household. Yes, you might miss out on some things. Namely: sleep! I worked a midnight shift, which allowed me to partake of activity during the day. Also, when you have days off during the week, it's cool because you can go places and avoid the crowds! However, working a 2-10 shift is rough if the kids are school-aged, as you rarely see them. I was able to trade shifts with others pretty easily. Holidays are a little strange. We sometimes would celebrate a day or two before. You will find it is the quality of the time you spend with the kids, and not so much the amount of time, that is really important.


I hope others chime in with the answer to your question, I just wanted to give you a different perspective. Best of luck!


Kim

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Aubrey’s Answer

Hello Julia!

I have worked for multiple big companies in hospitality from Disney to Marriott and Hilton. In the hospitality industry I am sure you have heard the term "We work while others play." Which rings pretty true for the nature of the job. I have had schedules be all over the place and rarely have I had a strict Monday-Friday 9-5 pm job. Although I do not believe it is out of the realm of possibilities. I would ask yourself where you see yourself going in the industry, what are your goals career wise? I have seen management of hotels take on a more M-F 9-5 position. Otherwise if you are more involved in maybe housekeeping or food and beverage, or even event services, flexibility is a must.

On the other hand the hospitality industry has a lot of perks that come with it, especially if you have a family. Being able to travel with discounts can save a lot in the long term of things. Even if you cannot get a strict Saturday and Sunday off, you might be able to get close to it and make your regular days off your true weekend.

Best of luck in your endeavors, it is what you make it!
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Sokhun’s Answer

Hi Julia, I’ve worked at two hotels so far. I started out in housekeeping, moved over to the desk as a night auditor, moved over as an FD agent, and FD manager on duty. Although the hotel industry is not the most schedule-friendly because your hours can change week to week as an agent and hotels are literally open 24/7. At the company I worked for, AGM’s and GM’s worked M-F but were also on call just in case anything critical happens. It was really rare that we would need to call them. Jobs that can offer the consistency of a M-F job include: Director of Operations, AGM/GM/DOR (director of rooms), executive housekeeper, finance, accountant, restaurant GM, HR, Finance, Accounting, Front Office Manager (although they might need to flex every once awhile), sales, reservations agent, F&B manager, and marketing.
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Christine’s Answer

Hi Julia,


While it seems like weekends are peak time for hospitality professionals to be at work, I can assure you that this is not always the case. Most of my experience comes from the hotel industry, and while I’ve worked in departments where working weekends was mandatory, I have also worked in departments where it is Monday - Friday from 9am - 5pm. If you are looking for more of a schedule like this, I would recommend administrative work such as Sales, Accounting or Human Resources, which don’t really require weekends.


I hope this helps!


Best,

Christine

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Frank’s Answer

Sales Manager, General Manager are usually M-F, 9-5 positions.

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Mary’s Answer

Hi Julia! I’ve worked in restaurants and hotels for 5 years and typically don’t have weekends off. If you’re wanting to be a front line manager or someone closely involved with guests you most likely will work weekends.

However, if you’re interested in corporate side of hospitality there is a great chance you will! Sometimes there are guest call centers that work m-f or behind the scenes such as prep work or financial recording.

Hope this helps!
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Maria’s Answer

Hi Julia!

I agree with all of the other answers that have been provided-- flexibility with your schedule is crucial when working in the hospitality industry. I work in corporate events and am in the office doing the planning most of the time. However, there is a lot of travel and late nights + weekend work required when working onsite at an event.

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Jamie’s Answer

I left my previous job working for a luxury hotel chain due to the long hours involving weekends and holidays. I was able to transition to corporate hospitality and my work hours are 9 am - 5pm with occasional evening events. The events usually don't last past 7pm and only occur once a week. When we have weekend events, I know about it months in ahead and can plan accordingly.
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Aleksandra’s Answer

Human Resources positions mostly do not require weekend shifts as well as Finance Department.
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