4 answers

When learning to be a computer engineer is it hard to learn how to code.

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I always thought coding would be hard. #technology #computer-engineering

4 answers

Chris’s Answer

Updated

Learning to code is not difficult. It's not uncommon for someone to learn the basics of a language like Python in a few hours, granted that's without understanding any of the underlying theory.


I'd encourage you to think of programming like any other skilled trade. Carpentry is a good example.


How hard is it to nail two boards together? Not very hard. What if you wanted to build a box? That's a little harder, but if you know how to nail two boards together, you should be able to take that idea and extend it to a box. How about a cabinet? That's sort of a collection of boxes. See where I'm going?


You start small, learn simple things, and then build upon those ideas as you tackle more complex problems. A lot of people scare themselves away from programming because they look at something like Microsoft Excel or Facebook or some other big app and think "I could never build that. It would be way too hard and too much to learn." But just like someone learning carpentry wouldn't immediately build a piece of high-end furniture on their own, someone learning to program doesn't immediately need to know how to build a giant app.


You start by learning how to print one line of text, and then you add ideas on top of that. Things will get harder and more complex as you progress, but you're really just adding to things you already know how to do.

Chris recommends the following next steps:

  • Check out CodeAcademy's Python course: https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python
so what should i learn first, i'm a freshmen in high school and i really want to be a computer engineer or computer scientist but i don't know what code laungage is the best to start and or easy christopher K.
Python is a solid choice for a first language. https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python Chris Dodds

Scott’s Answer

Updated

writing code is no more difficult than math or any other quantitative subject. The key is to focus and apply yourself. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and try new thing. The best coders are creative and take risks. If you enjoy coding you will do just fine!!

Jasanpreet Kaur’s Answer

Updated

When you are learning to be a computer engineer, it is not at all hard to learn to code.


What counts? Is your level of interest.


Once you start with the basic level of coding and if you develop a curiosity to play around with more codes or to develop something, Bang On! you are on the right path.


Note: Coding is really interesting. If you will start you will for sure dig more.


Good Luck!


#career #job #skills #computerscience #computer-engineering

Ken’s Answer

Updated

One thing that is very important to remember is that if something is very difficult for you to learn, perhaps you are trying to learn the wrong career area. Computer engineering is comprised of many different parts. You may excel in one or several of the areas, but not all. That is OK. That is just an indication of what areas for which you are more suited for than others. Here is a video that will help you to understand what is involved in computer engineering. ## https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avZTQgLs064 ##. Below, I will give you some tips from my years of Human Relations and College Recruiting that will allow you to see how you might fit into this wide ranging area.

Ken recommends the following next steps:

  • When doing college recruiting, I found too many students did not take the time and effort to determine how their personality traits matched with those of people in various career areas. When they skipped this step, they too often ended up in an area for which they were ill suited. A very important step is to take an interest and aptitude test in high school and have it interpreted by a counselor. This will show you how your personality traits match with various careers. When entering college, you may want to do this again, as the interpretation could be slightly different based on the offerings of the college. However, do not wait to do this until college, as it will show you the high school courses necessary to follow an appropriate career path. Too often, students, due to poor planning, have had to take and pay for college classes, which they could have taken free in high school.
  • When you have determined suitable career areas, talk to the person at your high school and college, who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow those who are doing what you think that you might want do, so you can get their advice. Not only will you be getting some good information, but you will be forming networking connections that will help you throughout your education/career journey. Here are some helpful tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
  • Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get to know the inside view of the career area and begin to develop networking contacts. These professional associations are the means by which professionals keep up with their career area following college and advance in their career area. These professional associations also may have or know of internship, shadowing, coop, and scholarship opportunities, which might help you along the way. Here are some helpful tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
  • It is very important to show appreciation to those along the way who have taken time and effort to assist you. I will provide some tips that will enable you to do this easily. ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##