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How hard is it to get into a nursing program/medical school?

#nursing #medical-practice #nurse #healthcare #hospital-and-healthcare

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michael’s Answer

Getting into a nursing program is competitive. That means there are sometimes more candidates then spots available. Some people wait for a long time to get into a program and others are accepted on their first application.


Here are some suggestions to increase your chances of being selected :

1) Have a good GPA. Nursing schools frown on C's

2)Gain volunteer experience helping people. This shows empathy and that you have an interest in helping people.

3)Work as a nurse assistant if possible. This will show that you have an idea what nursing is truly about.


Best wishes for the program you plan to attend. Remember, if you do not get accepted on your first time applying, keep trying. Do not give up on your dream. Stay positive!


S. Fontenot,RN



Thank you comment icon Great advice! Jordan Rivera, Admin COACH
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H’s Answer

Most schools have an application process. They look at your GPA, some still look at ACT/SAT scores, along with grades in some core classes (most require B or higher and you are only allowed a certain number of C grades). Some will also require letters of recommendation. Don’t be disappointed if you don’t get in the first time you apply.
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Martha Cecile’s Answer

There are many GPAs and MCAT scores with which to compete, as well as glowing letters of recommendation, when you're applying to medical school - nothing stands out in a sea of sinners who are described as saints. When YOU are asked to make any personal comments about yourself, phrase them in an interesting way, give examples and be certain your grammar is above board. If English is not your first language, get someone knowledgeable to proofread your answers. The personal interview is where you can nail it! The examiner wants to know that you have done exactly what Michael, above, suggested to get into nursing school - DEMONSTRATE the qualities that make great physicians, and ACQUIRE practical experience to demonstrate you are closer (than others) to understanding what medicine is about! As a physician, I don't actually believe that volunteering at the hospital to run errands, deliver flowers, etc. gives a person one iota of insight into being a physician - but spending summers translating at a low-cost clinic might! Also, actually working (for income) in the healthcare setting is valuable, since you observe closely how doctors, nurses, imaging techs, etc. work together. Bottom line: achieve success at your personal interview by demonstrating knowledge and commitment to your field, because nobody will select the pampered pooch who learned about doctoring from watching TV.
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