7 answers

I am interested in a multitude of things that, how do I know which career would be right for me?

8
100% of 7 Pros
Asked Viewed 338 times Translate

Some career related things I am interested in science, traveling, photography, helping people, reading and writing. I like a challenge and to do something different everyday. #career-path #complicated #career-counseling #career-path #career #confused #help #life problems

8
100% of 7 Pros

7 answers

Terry’s Answer

2
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Hi Myshelle! It is hard to decide on a career, but the good news is that there are many exciting options out there for you. I would recommend a few things:


1) Make a list of the careers that you are most interested in.

2) Check out job postings within those careers - read the descriptions and see what excites you the most.

3) Network with people who are currently in those careers and ask them questions. People who love their jobs usually love to talk about them, so don't be afraid to introduce yourself and ask questions. If you are currently in school, a teacher/advisor/counselor may be able to set up a site visit for you to visit. Or, talk to friends & family to see if they know anyone.

4) Volunteer for positions/activities that match up with these jobs/careers, or even with organizations in your community that have connections to companies/employees in those careers, or someone on their Board in that field. Not only will you network with people, but you will also find out if you enjoy it.

5) Get online and find blogs by people in careers that might interest you, and/or heck out LinkedIn for active professionals with prolific posts. Read what they have to say about their experiences and post questions. You'll be surprised how easy it is to network.


Hope this helps & you find your path, but most of all, I hope you enjoy the journey...don't rush it - finding your career passion can be a lot of fun and you will meet the most amazing people along the way! :)

2
100% of 1 Pros

Karina’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate
Hi Myshelle!
I would suggest doing those multitude of things (as careers too!!!). You may have to work on your time management skills though :)
1
100% of 1 Pros

Deborah’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Hi Myshelle!


I was facing the same dilemma when I was about to graduate from university. I took a leap of faith and ultimately pursued a role that would give me exposure to building professional relationships and career development opportunities within the non-profit sector (because helping others is a core value of mine). In my mind, this was a great way to kickstart my own career journey and get to know industry leaders to help me develop in-demand skills in the process. The truth is, you won't really know what's right for you until you've done a trial run in a professional role.


To kickstart your career exploration, take a moment and ask yourself:

  1. My ideal role will allow me to... Remember no one knows you better, than you (so own that)...
  2. What sort of skillset will I need to meet my goals? <span style="background-color: transparent;">Think about the areas that are necessary for the role(s) you are interested in pursuing or the areas you want to improve or become knowledgeable in. </span>
  3. My target benefits should include…(now these are generally going to be the the things that would make working more of a supportive & adaptable environment for you) some examples of work benefits could be work mobility (the ability to move around in various roles within an organization), or be provided with learning opportunities that lead to career growth, maybe a competitive salary (although early on in your career learning and development opportunities can sometimes be more lucrative for you in the long run).
  4. Lastly, What will my milestones look like? Try to aim for small goals that you set yourself up for success and stay motivated.

If you haven't done so already, connect with a mentor or a career counselor to help you evaluate what you might see yourself doing, what your strengths are, & what areas you would like to develop or what industries are of interest to you. From there, you can get a better idea of what academic/vocational paths are necessary to get you closer to career success!


Above all, remember it's ok to not be 100% certain about what you want to do. Instead, try remembering who you want to be, and don't be afraid to take a chance on roles that will steer you in the direction that's best for you.


Best of luck!

Deborah, Career Coach at No Career Limits

Deborah recommends the following next steps:

  • If you haven't done so already, connect with a mentor or a career counselor to help you evaluate what you might see yourself doing, what your strengths are, & what areas you would like to develop or what industries are of interest to you. From there, you can get a better idea of what academic/vocational paths are necessary to get you closer to career success!
  • Get started on a career kickstarter plan (establish your career goals, define your core values, evaluate your skillset and experience, work on a hyper-targeted job search to match your goals with employers that will support your continued career growth!
0

Alexandra’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Hi Myshelle,


It is great that you have diverse interests and you don't have to settle ona single interest right away. The best way to explore different careers is through having some experience actually working in an environment where you can see how professionals work in a certain field. You can do that through internships but you can also "shadow" someone for a day or two and see what they do on a daily basis. Is there a professional/mentor who you admire? Ask them to spend a day observing what they do. You might find it exciting and wonderful, or you may just see that it is not for you (and that is fine, too!).


Another way is to simply talk to people about their career path. Do you have a neighbor who's an engineer? A cousin who is a baker? Take the time to ask them what they like and dislike about their job. Ask them to be honest. Ask them what they would do differently if they could start over. Also, don't be afraid to ask them: are you happy? I asked this at a job interview once and the person was very honest with me. Their honesty and guidance shaped my whole career.

0

Kim’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Myshelle,

You have a very diverse area of interest which will broaden your opportunities within your career path. And the advice you've been given already is excellent. One additional thought to consider is to gain insight into your true strengths. My favorite assessment is StrengthsFinder. The resulting report will provide insights into your natural strengths and what potential opportunities may align with them. This may help provide some general direction for your career path. At the very least it will explain why you have interest and skills in certain areas and not in others. Best of luck .

Kim recommends the following next steps:

  • Retain the report for reference as your career path continues.
  • Take the assessment and review the resulting report for insights into your true strengths.
  • Research the StrengthsFinder assessment to determine the value to your decision-making process.
0

Mr.’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Create your own lane by combining each interest and skill into a chain of work.

Take your time and consider each craft and its benefits and balance and examine which will work side by side.

Most importantly network with leagues and internship programs to receive advice and first hand training.

Execute your choices little by little until they begin to gell together.

0

ROXANNE’s Answer

0
Updated Translate

Hi, Myshelle.


That is great that you know what you are interested in! I really like to hear that, and it's a great start. Speaking of starting, let me start with this thought, which I share with all young people seeking career advice: DO WHAT YOU LOVE. Why do I say this? Because working is tough, it's competitive, but more than that, it's a challenge every day. It can take all of your energy just to keep on keeping on, if you know what I mean. It makes things a good deal easier if you love what you do. The career that you choose will have a huge impact on the quality of your life, so make sure that it's something that you really enjoy doing, and that you can be proud of at the end of the day.


ASSESS YOUR STRENGTHS WITH A CAREER APTITUDE TEST. This advice has been given previously, and it's good advice. Keep in mind your strengths and then ask yourself, what do you love (that is within your skill set and abilities) that could be a viable career for you? Are you a self-starter? Could you work for yourself and start your own business or would you want to work for someone else?


EDUCATION IS IMPORTANT. Ground level these days as a professional pretty much means that you need a Bachelor's Degree in most fields. As someone who only attained an Associate's Degree, I am hyper-aware that this limits my future career choices unless I commit to another couple of years of education. The next question is what are your resources? How much time and money do you have available to get you where you need to go? If your funds are limited, what assistance can you earn or apply for? Are there scholarships available to you? Can you get what you need going to community college and state universities?


Having limited funds doesn't necessarily mean that the college you hope to attend is necessarily off the table. If you have a particular college that you are interested in, as I did, you can check with their Financial Aid department, as I did, and request some assistance in finding the resources to attend the school you want. Despite having only an Associate's Degree, the school I attended was very well-known and was also very expensive. I made the most of what was available to me, and I attended, anyway. At the time, it was perfectly acceptable to search for a career with a two year degree. That is no longer the case these days in most industries. It is more competitive out there then ever. That said, try not to overburden yourself with debt at the start of your career, if at all possible. That, in itself, can be very limiting for you. Some careers, such as Nursing, will be lucrative enough that student debt won't be as much of an issue. Be careful with your choices, and let your mentors help guide you in making the right ones.


ROXANNE recommends the following next steps:

  • GET AN APTITUDE TEST. Keep in mind your strengths, and ask yourself what do you love to do that is an actual career option for you?
  • GET AN EDUCATION. Again, I recommend a Bachelor's Degree for most careers. This is the climate these days. It's very competitive out there these days, and it pays to be prepared.
  • ASK YOURSELF - Are you a self-starter, or will you be working for someone else? What other resources do you need?
  • FIND YOURSELF A MENTOR, preferably, someone who already has what you want, and can give you the guidance you need to get there.
0