Skip to main content
2 answers
4
Asked 623 views

What are some of the challenges that you face being a FBI of investigation?

#law-enforcement #fbi #law

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

2 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Nayeli,

In law enforcement, there are both professional and personal challenges. These include things like adjusting to shift work, weird days off, staying late to finish a case, missing out on get togethers with family and friends, not being able to go to your kid's games, etc.

Sometimes you have to arrest people even though you want to let them go, because, well, that's the job. I have had to arrest people who I knew would be missing their mom's funeral or their daughter's wedding. Sometimes you work in nasty weather - wet, cold, muddy, etc.

There can be challenges in getting along with coworkers, supervisors, or management, but, that happens in any job. In law enforcement, there are after-action reviews, where, sometimes you are left feeling like they are questioning your judgement.

In the current climate, you may have less community support than officers did in the past. You also have to assume that everything you say and do when handling a call is being filmed/recorded by somebody. Even a good deed could get you in trouble. While it used to be common to let minors empty their illegal beer, or, dump out a little bit of marijuana, these actions were in fact in violation of most policies.

In the FBI, you are subject to transfer, or perhaps temporary reassignment to help investigate a major situation. I'm not really sure how that works.

All that being said, law enforcement was a fun job. If it is something you are interested in, I encourage you to keep asking questions!

Thank you comment icon This is true. Being a federal agent. Is hard work and very sophisticated and probably rewarding. But it is hard to get into, can be political, and is not as financially rewarding as other professions that require similar skills and credentials. Many people I know want to be an FBI agent but once they see how getting into the FBI all works they move on on to other thing which better suits their lives and goals Jonathan Whitcomb
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kimberly’s Answer

Good question. I'd like to answer it from a different perspective than the last response because I think she covered the difficulties of the job very well. Something a lot of people don't know when considering high profile jobs, such as an FBI agent, is the reality of the job compared to how it is portrayed on tv. On tv, the agents are very glamorous and have unlimited resources and cooperation to solve their cases. They get results back almost immediately (fingerprints, ballistics, DNA, etc.). In real life, agents spend a majority of their time at a desk doing paperwork. They are not constantly kicking down doors and hanging from a rope attached to a helicopter. It takes weeks and sometimes months to get test results back so you aren't able to finish or clear a case in one day like they often do on tv. You also do not have unlimited resources and technology that can provide instant results.
This is not to deter or discourage you, it's meant to open your eyes to the reality of these types of positions so you can enter them with clear expectations. This type of position can be very rewarding and meaningful, if you are willing to work hard and put the time in. Your family and personal life often take a backseat to these types of positions because you have to be willing to choose what's best for the job.
Again, I don't want to discourage you. I loved my position in federal law enforcement and wouldn't have changed my path. I've learned so much and made a huge impact in people's lives and that is a phenomenal feeling. I've made great friends that I consider family and have made such a huge positive impact in my life. I encourage you to pursue your passion but talk to as many people as you can in the field you want to enter, prior to "taking the plunge." Good luck

Kimberly recommends the following next steps:

Complete as many internships as you can in the field you are interested in
Look into military service as a means to build your resume for federal law enforcement
Go to your local field office and ask the agents to talk to you (explain that you are interested in their field)
0