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Are there any other degrees besides accounting that will allow me to still work as an investment manager?

I know working in the financial services industry requires a lot of math and accounting skills, but I would like to study something other than accounting. Would it be wise for me to study something other than accounting? #college #finance #accounting #financial-services #investment-management #investing

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Philip’s Answer

As others have mentioned, there are many possible paths into investment management. To directly answer your question, while an accounting degree could be helpful to get into investment management, finance or economics would likely be similarly, if not more, useful depending on the particular role you were interested in. Accounting degrees prepare you for a career in accounting after all. If you were looking beyond a business focused degree then math, computer science, or engineering would likely provide you with an appropriate background for many investment jobs, especially more of the entry level roles.

If you are looking to expand your education more broadly, my personal path was to major in economics at a liberal arts school. So while I spent a good deal of time on a subject that prepared me to work in investment management, I also was able to enjoy literature and history coursework.
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Janette’s Answer

I agree with Chloe's answer. I majored in Political Science, went to Law School, practiced law for 20 years and then transitioned into financial services. My reasoning was this: as a attorney I was very successful in helping clients to acquire or recover assets but I noticed a trend. Most clients who obtained financial assets depleted these assets within a few years. I wanted more power in my professional arsenal, namely I wanted to assist clients in protecting and preserving their assets. So I started studying to learn about financial vehicles that would accomplish this. I was then recruited by Financial Companies with strong, well established training programs (all major financial companies will have training requirements that assist you in becoming conversant with financial products, their suitability and sales).Just make certain that you keep your personal, educational and professional background as free from controversy and blemish as possible. You must pass significant background checks at both State and sometimesFederal levels in order to be licensed and work in this industry. Good Luck.

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Robert’s Answer

I have an accounting undergraduate degree and also went to law school and practiced for many years before transitioning into financial services. Financial services is a very team oriented business. Some people are terrific analysts, others have great organizational and management skills, others are great at building and maintaining client relationships, especially through difficult market conditions. Its rare you see the whole package in one person. You need a track record of success and differentiation in this business but it can come in any number of ways. Major in what you like and do well, develop and sharpen those people skills, never forget its a business all about helping others, keep a strong moral compass, and you will do fine.

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Chloe’s Answer

There are a lot of different roles in the investment management industry, and the professionals in the industry majored in a wide range of different things in college (I majored in International Business). You should focus on what you're passionate about, and that will lead you to the best career opportunities for you. That said, some very common majors for the industry include Finance, Economics, and General Business. Accounting is a popular major for certain types of roles, but you can take an intro accounting course in college without doing a full accounting major. There are also a number of people who have majored in other business areas (such as Marketing), or who have liberal arts degrees (such as English).

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