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What career path is right for me


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15 answers


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Amanda’s Answer

It may take several attempts at finding the "right" career. Figure out not only what you're interested in, but also what you're good at. You may not LOVE a career, but if you are good at it, it can still be satisfying!

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Tia’s Answer

Hi Rahul!

First, I agree with Stephen. Strength Finders 2.0 is a great book to help you discover your core strengths.

Second, think about what you are passionate about. What do you want to learn more about? What interests do you have?

Third, as others stated, don't stress too much about it. This is a great time to do internships and discover more about companies that you are interested in to learn about their culture. There are several people who are now in a career that they didn't start off in. You have the tools (Eg: LinkedIn) where you can easily reach out and connect with people. Perhaps even find a mentor.

Also be patient. Even if you don't start off in a position that you love, you can always learn a skill that will likely be applicable in your next career move.

Best of luck!

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Raquel’s Answer

Thanks for the additional information Rahul!

I truly believe that if you don't know what you want to do, finding and following your passion will always take you where you're supposed to be. Ask yourself "what do I love the most?" Do you like helping people? Do you like traveling? Are you passionate about new technology?

There may be more than one answer but it will help guide you in the right direction. Happy to continue this conversation :-)


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Raquel’s Answer

Hi Rahul!

That is a question only you can answer. However there are tools accessible to you that can assist you in making a decision. See below a few ones I have used or recommended before.

Raquel recommends the following next steps:

Read the articles and take the quiz. It may not tell you a specific career but you can have an idea of the path that best matches your personality.

Hi, I'll be graduating from James Madison University with a BBA in Management and a minor in Entrepreneurship & Innovation. Plethora of sales & start-up experience, really like freedom & autonomy but looking for post-graduation jobs when you really don't know what you want to do yet is kinda tough. I took the quiz and checked out the articles but I was wondering if you had any additional insight. Rahul Z.

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Erin’s Answer

Follow what you are interested in. You have to spend way too much of your life working to hate what you do. Now, you might not LOVE it, but find something that you don't hate. Your taste will change over time and you can make changes through your career. Take quizzes online that are based on career paths. Apply for a variety of jobs and see what might be a good fit!

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Andrew’s Answer

Take an iterative approach. Take a step, evaluate, set your course and take another step. Repeat.

In some professions like law there is a clear path. You start as an associate, then senior associate, then partner. For business professionals the options are endless. It's important to network and solicit input from others about your decision making process.

Keep an eye out for the moments when you get goosebumps while at work. What are you doing in that moment? For me it happens when I make a sincere connection with a customer. Then, try to find a position (or create one) where you're doing that activity as much as you can.

Ask yourself the question, "does this work energize me?"

There are so many possibilities out there, try not to get overwhelmed. Take it one step at a time.

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Lynn’s Answer

  1. Keep in mind that whatever career you start with probably won't be the one you end with, so don't stress out trying to decide now. I went from government regulator to consultant to sales.
  2. Sales is a good way to get the independence you want. If you can, get something that is business to business and is based on developing relationships, not based on a one-call close (a one-call close is where you must pressure the prospect into buying what you're selling in the very first meeting, something like selling copiers).
  3. Management and business management are not likely to give you the autonomy you want, especially in the early years.

Lynn recommends the following next steps:

Write up a resume for each type of position even if that means just putting "I am interested in a career in sales" or "I am interested in a career in management" for each resume
Interview with 2 or 3 companies in each area if you can. Choose the one that you feel most comfortable with.
Don't stress. Right now you may be thinking "I've got to choose the rest of my life in the next month or two" and that is definitely not true. Best of luck.

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Noorayaz’s Answer

Everyone else here is providing great advice. Find a mentor or counselor to help determine what paths would fit you. But then go and meet people in those businesses. Spend a day in the life and see if it is something you would enjoy. Learn the good and bad. So that you can make an educated decision. After all this, look at the programs to see if you could complete those courses. Would you be excited, focused and motivated. Or, would you be bored. After all this, find your passion and align it with your interests - that is the best path

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Will’s Answer

Hi Rahul,

I agree with Lynn’s Answer.

I've done a couple of different things during my career from being a teacher to now being in Sales selling Sofware.

If you have a chance, get into an internship program to gain hands-on experience in an area that excites you.

Make a list of professions that you'd be interested in, take into considerations the things that matter to you the most like well-being, working hours, family, salary and write down the pro and cons of each one.

Think about what motivates you the most. For some people it's money, for other people it's helping other people and so on. That should give you some guidance.

Best of luck!

Will








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Maureen’s Answer

To answer this question, you must first explore your own skills, disposition, geographical situation, and personality preferences. When are you happiest, when are you feeling most at peace? Consider what you are 'doing' when you feel confident and worthy. Consider what profession can be tethered to these actions. I am a practical person, so also consider your geographical location and the opportunities that exist today, and will exist tomrrow. Read, ask this question to those that know you well, and experiment. Internships and hobbies may give you insight into the right career for you.

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Maria’s Answer

Hello there!

What are your interests, strengths etc.?

Start with that. There are many resources on line to help you perform a self assessment to better understand your strengths and interests and match you with possible career paths.

Good luck!

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Maria’s Answer

Hello there!

What are your interests, strengths etc.?

Start with that. There are many resources on line to help you perform a self assessment to better understand your strengths and interests and match you with possible career paths.

Good luck!

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Stephen’s Answer

I think this is the key question all young people entering the "work force" area asking. Particularly if, like many people in high school, thinking about college, in college---what should I major in? What should I look to do for a career? I have three boys all in the work force or studying to start a career and I had them keep a list of the top 5-10 things that really interest them. Whether that be working outside, or doing research or working with people in an office or studying to become an attorney to practice law, typically we all can come up with these interests. Spend the time to think through your answers. I also recommend highly buying the book Stengthsfinders 2.0 by Tom Rath. (Amazon or eBay for $25 hardcover typically and $15 used/soft cover. This is a really fast and easy read focused on you and what you do well, what strengths do you have. The range from personal communication to more tangible things like Math/Algebra. The concept is if you are not "good" at something (let's take Calculus) then do what you need to for school, but don't focus on that, focus on your core strengths and what you want to do. At the end of the book, you take a test and it gives you a grade on your strengths. Really good quick read and review for you to keep handy and help you focus on core strengths.

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Prentice’s Answer

There are many online options as well for an answer, but here is a quick list you can use to figure out which career path you should take.
1. Assess Yourself
2.Make a List of Occupations to Explore
3.Explore the Occupations on Your List
4.Create a "Short List"
5.Conduct Informational Interviews
6.Make Your Career Choice
7.Identify Your Goal
8.Write a Career Action Plan

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Abbey’s Answer

Hey there! This is a great question and the answers above have provided extremely helpful information/resources. I would agree that the important thing is to figure out your interests, strengths, working style, motivators - all things that are difficult to reflect on and figure out, but give yourself the time, space, and exploration time to do some personal discovery!
In addition to the Strength Finders book (which I found super helpful), I would also recommend the book "Designing your life" by Bill Burnett & Dave Evans. It's by 2 Stanford professors who teach a Design course and use the "Design Frameworks" to approach your Life. It has advice around networking, having exploratory conversations, do's and don't's of the job search, as well as assessing your life holistically. I've found it extremely helpful in paying attention to where you find energy, where you are extremely engaged, what types of "work" (even without compensation) that you do in your daily life. I personally wish I read it earlier in my career to help navigate career paths and opportunities!
Link here: https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Your-Life-Well-Lived-Joyful/dp/1101875321
Hope this helps,
Abbey

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