7 answers

Can i still play sports even though im studying law?

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I want to go into the criminal justice program and its a whole lot of work, will I be able to still play sports? Is it recommended ? #law #sports #management

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7 answers

Trisha’s Answer

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Hello Brenda -

It may depend on what program you are in. However, there is a lot of research that indicates that being involved in the campus / collegiate community including being an athlete at the division or varsity level or at the recreation level will help you to be a better student. It will certainly require strong time management skills. I encourage you to plan on it, but in the end it will be extremely important for you to put your academics first. You can certainly plan your time around this, a lot of successful students do.

Best of luck!
Trisha
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Brandon’s Answer

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In my first go around in college, I studied Criminal Justice at CSUS where I was also active in a social fraternal organization and acted as communications officer. In that role I would draft and distribute communications from the rest of the leadership members, as well as solicit/engage active and inactive members (approx 200) in order to incentivize them to participate in activities and fundraisers. Playing sports is more demanding, but doable if you properly manage your time.

I would suggest you document all of your existing activities related to school and personal life in a calendar. I prefer google calendar for personal events to sync to my Android, but a spreadsheet would do just fine. This would include tracking ALL activities:

  1. Eating (1-2 hours/avg)
  2. Sleeping (5-8 hours/avg)
  3. School classes
  4. Time for studying (rule of thumb: each hour of class = 2 hours of studying
  5. Traveling to/from ALL activities (classes, dining hall, dorm/home, social, etc)
  6. Social events (dates, coffee meetups, concerts, etc)

Brandon recommends the following next steps:

  • Decide on how you will track your schedule: Google Calendar, Outlook, iCal, Spreadsheet ... or something else.
  • Make it easy to update on the fly. I love the ability to add events on my android phone while on the bus, 'El', or sitting in rush hour traffic. It then syncs to my online calendar, PC, and tablet.
  • Include all possible activities that you know you have right now, document them and now look at what time you have available AFTER you include everything you already know.
  • If you already know what the practices will look like, add these in to your schedule. Include home/away games as well as traveling for those activities.
  • Once it is all documented, is it doable? Can you conceivably and effectively maintain an appropriate GPA for Law School and enjoy extracurricular activities?
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Kim’s Answer

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Brenda,

I know many lawyers, and, from what I have heard, your first year of law school your head will be spinning, you will be doubting yourself, etc etc. You will want to have as much "free" time as possible to spend in the library, studying, etc. Some schools do not allow you to have a part-time job. That should tell you how demanding it is. I definitely would not plan on having a regular scheduled activity (team practice and games) during the first year. However, I think an occasional pick-up game would be good as a stress release, as would jogging, working out, etc.

Second and third year students start getting into the actual practice of law. The law schools have law clinics which are comprised of students who are helping the needy. There is also the law school's law review journal, where students research and write about legal issues. You will want to get into one or the other of these, or some similar program, as, it will look good on your resume! Again, while the focus is school, you will want some sort of physical activity for stress release. It just shouldn't take up too much of your time!

Between 2nd and 3rd year, during the summer, law students normally find jobs working for attorneys, just for the summer.

All of these other activities will need to take priority over organized sports, while you are in law school. Once you graduate, you may have more time for sports. You may not. "Baby" Attorneys tend to work somewhere between 50 and 70 hours a week. It's a lot of work.

There are many alternatives available other than becoming an attorney. One would be to become a paralegal. This is usually a 2 year program, rather than the 7 years it takes to become an attorney. Paralegals do a LOT of the work for the lawyers. This includes research and writing. Each state has different requirements. If you want to go to school to become a paralegal, please choose your school carefully. There are many schools that do not have a good reputation. You will want to look for one that has an ABA (American Bar Assn) approved program.

Good luck to you!

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Ryan’s Answer

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Absolutely! Having a good work life balance is key to being able to play a sport. If it is something you would enjoy doing and means a lot you can make to play.
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Leïla’s Answer

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Hi Brenda!

First of all, congrats on being admitted to Law School. That is one of the most difficult part.

Regarding your question, it really depends at what level you are playing (is this a semi-professional activity)? If not, you will of course not be able to play/compete at a high level because Law School is so demanding. Other than that, you will find that an activity outside of law school is absolutely necessary for your mental well being.

So short answer is: it depends (you will learn that in law school too), but most likely yes.

Good luck!

Signed: Data Nerd for Goods

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Trisha’s Answer

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Hello Brenda -

It may depend on what program you are in. However, there is a lot of research that indicates that being involved in the campus / collegiate community including being an athlete at the division or varsity level or at the recreation level will help you to be a better student. It will certainly require strong time management skills. I encourage you to plan on it, but in the end it will be extremely important for you to put your academics first. You can certainly plan your time around this, a lot of successful students do.

Best of luck!
Trisha
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Gabe’s Answer

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Hi- unless you plan to play at the most competitive level, you should be able to play sports and it may actually help with your studies and integration into college life. Sports provide many positive health and social benefits. You may want to try your first semester without other than class commitments and see how it goes (if this is an option). Lots depends on you, the program etc. Stretch yourself but no at the cost of your academics.
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