8 answers

How to be come a UI/UX designer coming an engineering background ?

10
100% of 10 Pros
Asked Viewed 109 times

I'm a computer science engineering student .who is turning to UI/UX design as self-thought . #design #graphic-design #engineering #computer

10
100% of 10 Pros

8 answers

Charles’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated
I would suggest you focus on Human-Machine-Interface design - understand how humans prefer to interact with UX/UI - don't focus on making pretty or cool interfaces. They are worthless if the underlying functionality doesn't make sense.

Charles recommends the following next steps:

  • Read a classic "About Face, The Essentials of Human Interface Design" Alan Cooper
1
100% of 1 Pros

Srinivas’s Answer

0
Updated
Irrespective of your background, it is always suggested to get some certifications in Design if you are thinking about being a UX/UI Designer. You can do courses in any of the following avenues (not exhaustive, something, my friends in UX/UI field suggested):

https://www.nngroup.com/ux-certification/

https://www.interaction-design.org/courses

https://www.ideou.com

If you find the courses to be expensive in the above options, you can try taking a course on Skill Share
https://www.skillshare.com/

Once, you do the basic courses on UI/UX design and Design thinking, you can apply for internships for getting a real world experience and you will be in a good position to find some jobs and excel in the UI/UX Design career path
0

Jayaprakash’s Answer

0
Updated
First learn the basics of design and then venture further into UX design . Design is all about observations and noting how people behave . You need to be sensitive as well as receptive to things and environment around you.

You already have many tips given by the prior author and i will also suggest that you look at sites like coursera and udemy to upskill your self in these aspects i have mentioned .

Alternatively, you can attend bootcamp courses such as General Assesmbly (UXDI Full time)
0

Sabuj’s Answer

0
Updated
UI/UX design involves thinking about the user and their workflow and then coming up with the best approach to making your tool intuitive and easy to use. I suggest looking into these books: https://www.mockplus.com/blog/post/ux-design-books and then practice, practice, practice! Start your own project and apply principals of clean user centered design.
0

Muhammed’s Answer

0
Updated
To break into the UI/UX field, you need to work on multiple Product designs. This can be attained with attending courses with mock practices in them.

Muhammed recommends the following next steps:

  • Read Don Norman's "Design of Everyday Things" and if you find this interesting you could check out "Emotional Design" from the same Author
  • Check out Nielsen Normans website : https://www.nngroup.com/
0

Richard’s Answer

0
Updated
Theres a bit of unlearning you will have to do, in my honest opinion, to think top down rather than bottom up. Its habitual to think about the engineering side of a button or swipe, or the action it will trigger etc.
0

Kiah’s Answer

0
Updated
Boujour Younes,

UX design is a field where people start with many different backgrounds. Starting with an engineering background can be very beneficial, because you understand the different components of a system.

The most important thing to know in UX design is how your user will think and act. This means you have to be the bridge between the engineering side (what is possible) and the human side (what is desired). There are many differences between engineering and UX. UX design doesn't really have a series of repeatable steps or a language to learn; instead each new problem will require different thinking to solve. Sometimes the problem is fixing a communication process between people, sometimes it's developing software to meet a need.

There are many ways to learn UX design on your own, and one of the best ways is to read case studies to see what other designers do and how they talk about their work. Read through design systems to learn what kinds of things that designers think about, and see how you like different design systems, think about how you would solve those problems. Learn about best practices and all the kinds of challenges designers are faced with (Neilson Norman Group has excellent articles and videos).

If you decide you want to get a UX job, you will need to start to put together a portfolio. Some people put together a portfolio in a boot camp (I did General Assembly), some volunteer to help local businesses, some make up projects with hypothetical work. It's better to have real examples where your work has real impact, but the most important thing your portfolio should do is explain how you think and how you solve problems; always explain "why" you think something. Be careful of all of the websites that just make beautiful looking designs that could not function in the real world, or look nice but do not solve real problems or meet users' needs. This is where your background comes in handy; you might have a better sense of what is feasible to develop.

I think having an engineering background (especially if you have front end development skills) and developing your UX expertise will make you a strong candidate for many jobs.

Remember, UX designers generally love people (since humans are at the center of what we do), so try to find some in your local community who you can talk to and ask questions.

Bonne chance, Kiah

Kiah recommends the following next steps:

  • Sign up for Jan Haaland's Case Study Club email newsletter (https://casestudy.club)
  • Explore different design systems (Material Design, Shopify, Mailchimp, Apple, Microsoft, etc.)
  • Read Neilson Norman Group articles (https://www.nngroup.com/)
  • Create a portfolio that showcases how you solve problems: explain how you think
0

Alyssa’s Answer

0
Updated
Most User Experience / Interface roles will require a portfolio upon application so similar to the answer above, start practicing and building out your portfolio. A huge aspect to UI/UX is going to be wireframing so the more you can learn about it, the better.
0