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What kind of prior experience will i need before i go into a job interview?

I just need some background information so I #career #interviews know what I focus on right now.


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Subject: Career question for you
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John’s Answer

Ryan when you're interviewing for a job, the little things can make a big difference. Even a small mistake can cost you a job offer. Take the time to prepare so you can make the best possible impression at every job interview you go on.

THE FIVE DO'S AND DON'TS FOR JOB INTERVIEWS

FIVE TECHNIQUES FOR A SUCCESSFUL JOB INTERVIEW

1.) Check Out the Company – How much do you know about the company that just contacted you to schedule an interview? All the information you need is available online. Don't let your potential employer stump you with the question, "What do you know about this company?" It's one of the easiest questions to ace, if only you do some research before your interview.

2.) Be Prepared for a Phone Interview – While you're actively job searching, it's important to be prepared for a phone interview on short notice. You never know when a recruiter or a networking contact might call and ask if you have time to talk about a job opportunity.

3.) Brush Up Your Interview Skills – During a job interview, your ability to interact with the interviewer and articulate your thoughts are just as important factors in getting the job as the qualifications listed on your resume. Take some time before the interview to ensure your interview skill set is as ready as your resume.

4.) Make the Best First Impression – First impressions really do matter, and you don't have much time to make a good impression during a job interview. From the time you greet the receptionist until the time you leave the building, you're being evaluated as a potential new hire. It's important to leave everyone you meet with the best impression you can.

5.) Sell Yourself to the Interviewer – When you're in a job interview, it's up to you to sell your qualifications and credentials to the hiring manager. You'll also need to show the interviewer that you're a good fit for both the position and the organization. With some preparation, you'll be able to present yourself as a candidate any organization would love to hire. Doing your best to get the hiring manager on your side will

FIVE OF THE MOST COMMON INTERVIEW MISTAKES

1.) Dressing Inappropriately – When you interview for a job, it's imperative to look professional and polished. Although your attire may vary based on the position you're applying for — it's important to look well-dressed and put together, no matter what the company.

2.) Fuzzy Resume Facts – Of course, you should never "fudge" any facts on your resume. The more truthful you are on your resume, the better you will be able to discuss your past experience during your interview. It's understandable that some of your older experiences may be hard to recall. If you need to, take the time to ​recreate your employment history, so your resume is accurate.

3.) Not Paying Attention – Don't let yourself zone out during an interview. Make sure you are well-rested, alert, and prepared. Getting distracted and missing a question looks bad on your part. If you zone out, your potential employer will wonder how you will be able to stay focused during a day on the job, if you can't even focus during one interview.

4.) Talking Too Much – There is nothing much worse than interviewing someone who goes on and on. The interviewer really doesn't need to know your whole life story. Keep your answers succinct, to-the-point and focused and don't ramble—simply answer the question.

5.) Not Being Prepared – Be prepared with a list of questions to ask the employer so you're ready when you asked if you have questions for the interviewer. Review questions you should not ask during a job interview and the worst interview answers that you should avoid at all costs.

Hope This is Helpful Ryan

Thank You Devin. “You give but little when you give of your possessions. It is when you give of yourself that you truly give.” – Kahlil Gibran John Frick

Thank You Terri. “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” –Anne Frank John Frick

Thank You Brooke. “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good. ” – Ivan Scheier John Frick

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Katelyn’s Answer

Be confident! I always like to have good self talk to myself before an interview. I mentally say things like: you got this! You are going to do great on this interview! This company would be lucky to have me! Etc.
Doing this has helps me relax and go into the interview with more confidence. If I am going into an interview with mental negativity I feel like it could potentially show in my answers and expressions. the last big interview I had posted sticky notes with positive self talk all over my apartment, so it was everywhere and I was constantly seeing it.

Make sure to of course dress appropriate. I always buy a new outfit before an interview. For me it also helps with my confidence and makes me excited for the interview because I can wear the new outfit. Research the company and take notes, bring those notes into the interview to show you did your research. Ask questions!! Have at least 5 questions to ask, make sure the are tailored to the company and role. Google is a great resource to find good interview questions.

Arrive at least 5 minutes early and be mindful of your behavior in the waiting area, trust me they are looking!! Do not forget after the interview to get a thank you email, this is your last opportunity to highlight why you are a good fit for the role. Lastly, have fun!! If you land the job or not, you get interviewing experience and get to meet new people!

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Adam’s Answer

Great answers here. I typically follow these couple steps prior to an interview.

Google the company to understand as much as possibly about the main aspects of what they do.
Research the job description online
Prepare questions for the interviewer
Re review my resume to confidently and comfortable provide a background for myself
Gather my dress clothes

Good Luck and be confident in your future interviews!

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Zein’s Answer

There are some great comments here to help prep for your interview!! Research the company & the type of job, be prepared to share what you can do to help the company, ask questions (what it takes to be successful, type of training, career growth etc) and always ask for next steps if you are interested in moving forward.

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Brian’s Answer

Practice, practice, practice. Have family and friends who have some experience interview you, or at least discuss job interviews they have had in the past, difficult questions that are asked, and what to expect. Research the company for sure. Know what they do, and be prepared to ask questions. Be confident, and take your time. It can be very nerve racking, and everyone knows it. But if you can maintain composure, that will always be seen as a plus. Good luck.

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Avinash’s Answer

Hi Ryan,

Initially get to know about the organisation and their portfolio like what do they do? their history, products etc..
Be thorough with the expertise mentioned in your resume and prepare yourself for some regular interview questions like "Tell me about yourself?", "What are your strengths and weakness?" etc..
Rehearsing or doing a mock interview with your friend would really help.

Hope it helps!!

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joann’s Answer

Research the company and jo description. Arrive early for interview. Prepare questions for interview and practice mock interview.

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Cari’s Answer

Focus on the job description and be prepared with specific examples of situations you've experienced that align with the skills they are seeking. Even without a prior job, students can often relate some element of your education, extra-curricular or civic activities that align with the requested skills.

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Raymond’s Answer

As has been suggested before, becoming familiar with the type job you are interviewing for is extremely helpful. In addition if you have not interviewed before I suggest you might have a parent or friend create a mock interview session with several relevant questions about the field you want to enter. I hope this was helpful to you and I wish you all the luck in the world!

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Chris’s Answer

Hey Ryan,

It can be stressful applying for a job without the experience they might be looking for, I have been there.

My best advice would be to:

1) Tailor your resume to match (to your best ability) the qualifications/requirements that are in the job description, even just a few bullets that can relate to the job can get the attention of a recruiter.

2) Create a well tuned cover letter explaining your background, interests, and how you can apply this for the job you are looking into and how you can add benefit. I would focus a lot of my attention here

3) Network Network Network, if there is anyway to get advice from someone at the company and possibly a recommendation that would be huge.

Best of luck Ryan!

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Amra’s Answer

1. research the company
2. research the position
3. research the interviewer, so you can know a bit of their background, what they did before this company/position etc...
All the research is really so that you can ask intelligent questions abt the position, company, or interviewer.

Make sure you thought about potential questions they might ask such as: why this company, why this position, why you? Think of your qualities, and maybe areas that you need to improve. Avoid turning your weaknesses into strengths, those are truly cheap:).
I think the most important thing is to be yourself. There is never reason to be nervous in an interview or overprepare. It is important to be well dressed and groomed, and well mannered. Sometimes that is more important than knowing an answer to a technical question someone might think is a good idea to ask you. Hope this helps, and good luck!

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Andrew’s Answer

Even if you do not have experience in the specific field or a prior job that is similar to the job you are interviewing for, you can rely on your other experiences and relate those to the job responsibilities. For example if you play sports or participate in clubs, highlight the teamwork experience. You can also rely on personal obstacles or situations in which you have relied on problem solving skills that could be related to the position you are interviewing for.

In essence be creative to utilize the experience you do have to relate to the job responsibilities for the interview.

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Gabriela’s Answer

Hi Ryan,

Researching the company and the job role to see what skills they are looking for for would be a great place to start. Then, think about all your experience (classes, projects, volunteering, work, even hobbies) and try to match your capabilities & things you learned or skills you developed to the job requirements. The experience itself is very important, but what matters most is portraying enthusiasm, passion and an eagerness to learn. Be genuine and show your skills while expressing interest in the job and a desire to learn, and you will equip yourself with the tools to succeed in the interview.

Also, make sure that you gather a list of questions for the interviewer as that would highlight your interest in the position. Preparation is key.

Best of luck in your interview!

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Richard’s Answer

Be yourself, dress appropriately, and do your homework on the company you are applying for. Be on time and answer the questions honestly.

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Oscar’s Answer

Step 1: Determine what you want to do. Is Money your motivator? Or is something you love to do your motivator?
Does this require a college degree? Is a High School diploma sufficient?
Step 2: Once you've determined this then try to find companies that would meet your specific motivator.
Step 3: Using sites such as Glassdoor to search for salaries and reviews of the company. Determining the salaries and reviews for each company can help you eliminate or help identify a potential candidate employer. Also other things such as commute time and distance should factor in. Would you consider moving out of state for the job you want? Or do you want to stay local? Do these companies pay for college?
Step 4: Once you've identified a company check the job listings and if you have no experience try to go for entry level jobs that you can get into that will hire you with little to no experience. Or if you are experienced, will they pay you extra for your type of experience?
*** Side note: Always see if you know anyone who works at a company you want to go to. Its always best to get referred however, keep in mind a referral is very important and to a degree is a reflection of the person who referred you. Make sure if you are referred for a job and you get a job that you conduct yourself in a professional manner.
Step 4: Always make sure your resume is tailored to your job you are applying for. This does not mean lie, but it does mean put extra emphasis on things that match the job description.
Step 5: If you get to the interview stage of your dream job or desired job, then asking things such as schedule and how they specifically train their new hires and how they do the job they listed are factors to consider.
If you do not get the job or never even get called on, do not worry or get down on yourself. Try to consider maybe a lower paying job in the meantime that does the same type of job and gain more experience to get another crack at either the same company in the future, or try applying to a competing company who may do the same thing.

Hope this helps. - Oscar

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Syed’s Answer

Hi Ryan,

Your interview prep is highly dependent on the type of role and industry you are targeting. You need to think critically about how your prior experiences in school, at part time jobs and in extracurriculars will apply to the job you're interviewing for. That said, there are some common behavioral questions posted online that you can practice crafting your response for:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/30-behavioral-interview-questions-you-should-be-ready-to-answer
https://www.topechelon.com/blog/placement-process/top-behavioral-interview-questions-list-examples/

When you apply for a job and get the interview, you basically have a 50/50 shot of landing at the job. At that point, your interview skills will either make or break your ability to close the offer. Do ample research on the company, role, industry, etc. before you go in for the interview.

In general, you will want to keep your answers to 60-90 seconds in the following format:
1. Context: What was the situation? -> Stakes, major players, obstacles you faced, problem that needed to be solved, etc.
2. Action: What did you to do address the situation? -> Make sure this highlights the skills the interviewer is looking for
3. Result: What came out of your action? -> Quantify as much as you can

In addition, come up with a list of questions for the interviewer that cannot be easily Googled. These could relate to specific questions regarding the interviewers background or industry trends that affect the company you are speaking to.

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Katya’s Answer

Hi, prior to going for a job interview I would recommend you do the following :

1) do your research on the company you are going for an interview
2) research skills required for the position you are going
3) write down in few sentences or words and main key criteria’s required
4) understand if you have those qualifications
5) if not, it’s ok- the more knowledge you have about the requirements the better you can articulate during the interview ( watch some YouTube videos about the skills, read about the skills). `think of your past experience if you have ever used those skills and write down your life experience that you can share during the interview.
6)always dress for success- it doesn’t have to be fancy but it does need to be clean, ironed, and classy
7) make sure you are well groomed-nails, hair, jewerly
8) always prepare at least 3-4 questions you will ask at the end of he interview. This is very important part of the interview- and when you are asked by the interviewer :” do you have any questions ?”- you want to open you notepad and ask. This will show that you came prepared and also that you did a research on the company and thE position but also that you have high interest.
9) by asking questions at the en did the interview-allows you to engage in a dialogue and also view the company from the other side.
10) during the interview- it’s ok to share any Recognition you have had in the past. This is another way to show that you are a goal getter and striving for excellence.

Always come for the interview at least 15 minutes earlier. Being on time-is very important.

At the end of th winter view- ask if they have nay additional questions to you and let them know that you look forward connecting in the future.

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Catherine’s Answer

Whether you are fresh out of high school or starting your career after college, it is good to show that you've had some employment history. The type of job or jobs you've had previously don't necessarily need to be related to the field you are interested in. Holding a job while in school shows that you can handle a work/school balance lifestyle. I know someone who only focused on school and had a difficult time getting a job after he graduated from college because he didn't have any work experience. If you have the opportunity to be an intern or get a job in your interested field, that is a plus as well.

When you go into the interview, be yourself (it helps you relax) and be honest with your answers. Also prepare some questions you want to ask related to the company you are interviewing with. They want to see how well you will fit into their team, as well as, you want to make sure you are interested in joining their team.

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Shelagh’s Answer

Everyone has given great advice! In terms of adding to it, when people say to research a company, if they are public, read through their 10-K to see what they do and what risks they face. Have questions for the interviewer based on what you've researched. Asking smart questions is very important. An interview is for you to determine if you want to work there as much as it is for your interviewer. Don't be afraid to ask clarifying questions. If someone asks you, "how many traffic lights are in the town?," ask them how they define a traffic light (stop lights only) and how they define the town, etc. Then explain how you'd research the answer with the information they provided.

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Dwight’s Answer

Make sure you have a full understanding of the job requirements - you can get this from the job description that you responded to when you appled for the job.
Research the company: look at the company website to see what you can learn about their history, the executives, how long have they been with the company, what is their revenue? Things like that, but also be alert for cues about the culter of the company.
Google "the 10 best questions to ask in a job interview," then formulate some answers. Ask the recruiter what type of interview it will be: will there be case studies, behavioral questions (if this happened, how would you respond), more than one interviewer, things like that.

Don't forget to dress for success - its something you can ask the recruiter about, too - a suit and tie is good for office jobs, but probably not for non-office jobs. Whatever you wear, make sure its clean and fits well. Plan to arrive 15-30 minutes early, even if you don't go in right away, this will ensure you don't get stuck in traffic at the last minute. Even better if you drive to the interview site the day before at the same time as your interview to make sure you know where it is and what the traffic is like that time of day.

Get a good night's sleep the day before and take a breath mint before you go in - not gum! Offer a firm handshake to whomever you meet and be kind and courteous to whomever you meet, you never know who they might ask about how they interacted with you. If you are rude to the receptionist or security guard, that doesn't bode well for your ability to get along with others.

Finally, remember you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Google the best questions for you to ask the interviewer, like, is this a new position or are you filling a vacancy? If a vacancy, where did the previous employee go? If they aren't treating you right during the interview, consider how it might be to work for them.

There are plenty of books available to help you prepare, along with what you can find on the internet.

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Patricia’s Answer

The best advise is to be prepared. Research the company and have good questions to ask at the end of the interview. Always dress appropriately and act in a professional manner. Try to be friendly and connect with your interviewer. They will remember you. After the interview thank them for their time and ask when you can expect to hear from them.

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Roger’s Answer

Doing some due diligence on the skills and requirements someone is looking for goes a long way in helping you prepare for any job interview. It’s also important to remember that not everyone will “check-the-box” on the qualifications a hiring manager may be looking for, and everyone has to start somewhere. You’d be surprised how many managers are some times not afraid to hire someone with less experience or not having all of the skills they are looking for. But it’s up to you to demonstrate to them and instill trust you will do everything in your power to mold yourself into someone they ultimately envision for the job. Hiring you may just delay certain aspects of the job a bit as you gain experience, but in the end, you will end up being the best person for the job.

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James’s Answer

Lots of great responses here! I'll add that the question you ask the interviewer are just as important as the questions they ask you. An interview is a 2-way street and most interviewers consider it a good sign that you prepared for the interview if you ask good questions.

There are countless lists online of the best questions to ask in an interview, here's one of many articles on the topic:

https://www.businessinsider.com/questions-to-ask-at-end-of-job-interview-2016-4

Good luck!

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Stacy’s Answer

There are really great responses that have been provided and I agree with two of the common themes - Research and Preparation are key! Research of all types as many people have already outlined and also preparation!

Being prepared includes some of the following:
1. Do a test drive to the location to get an idea of time it will take and also allow you to prepare for alternative routes and identify parking so you won't be late.
2. Layout what you intend to wear the night before and make sure it is clean and pressed (It is always better to be overdressed than underdressed).
3. Practice a mock interview with a parent or trusted friend who will not only give advise but also give you confidence with answering interview questions
4. Prepare some questions to ask the interviewer; Find out what they like about the company!
5. Prepare to be interviewed by multiple people!

Good Luck with Future Interviews and Remember You are Interviewing the Company to Make sure they are a good fit for you just like they are interviewing you to make sure you are a good fit for the role and company!

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Lillian’s Answer

Hi - I would like to echo all of the previous responses on how to nail an interview.

I wasn't sure that by "experience" you mean't interview or work experience. Since a lot of the responses focus on interview tips, I wanted to focus on the latter. While your previous work experience is important, if you're a student without an internship, office job, or what have you - you don't have to minimize your previous work experience because it doesn't directly relate to the job you're applying to. You can spin any job to relate to something you're applying to.

For example, if you had a student job working in retail, the food industry, etc, don't discount those experiences because they don't relate to the office internship you're seeking. These type of jobs teach you discipline, money management, customer service, etc., all of which are valuable for the job you're looking for. Aim to spin and sell things to your advantage and never discount your work experience because it doesn't relate - make it relate!

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Matthew’s Answer

Most organizations aren't looking for extensive technical experience for applicants out of school, so any formal work experience or internships are good. Companies will often ask you to share your experiences to get a sense of how you work in teams, how you react to challenges, and whether or not you have a "self-improvement" mindset. So whatever work experience you gather, be mindful of how those things play out so that you can share them in an interview. Sharing stories from a work setting will generally be more favorable than stories from a school project or extra-curricular activity (but those are okay too!)

As you have a better idea of the type of industry you want to get into, you'll generally want to ensure you take classes or apply for internships in that field. The focus in your interview will still likely be on the topics I mentioned above, but having education in the field will demonstrate your interest in what the company does.

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Enma Ninoska’s Answer

Hi Ryan,

Job experience is a very tailored thing depending on what field you're going to. Take myself for example, I only ended up with one internship in my college career and still found a full time job, but in that sense I also made sure my skill set was up to par to make up for my lack of real job experience. Such as learning a coding language, even just the simplest like SQL; learning programs that are used in that industry a lot are very helpful because then the employer realizes you'll take less time to train and more time to start building value into the company. Also being in organizations and volunteering also show work ethics and show you can work within a team to get something done. That's very helpful if job experience is hard to come by. Don't get discouraged though, just build up your resume and while doing so you'll learn a lot of valuable skills and experience.

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Ray’s Answer

Research as much as you can the company you are going to be interviewing with as it shows initiative and allows you to ask pertinent questions when you are asked during the interview. Be a good listener too as you can many times pick up cues as to what's important to the person giving the interview and to their company. They are looking for a good fit in a new hire with their company's culture as well as filling a need. Be mindful of this and accentuate why you can fit in/ fill those needs. Good Luck.

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Amra’s Answer

1. research the company
2. research the position
3. research the interviewer, so you can know a bit of their background, what they did before this company/position etc...
All the research is really so that you can ask intelligent questions abt the position, company, or interviewer.

Make sure you thought about potential questions they might ask such as: why this company, why this position, why you? Think of your qualities, and maybe areas that you need to improve. Avoid turning your weaknesses into strengths, those are truly cheap:).
I think the most important thing is to be yourself. There is never reason to be nervous in an interview or overprepare. It is important to be well dressed and groomed, and well mannered. Sometimes that is more important than knowing an answer to a technical question someone might think is a good idea to ask you. Hope this helps, and good luck!

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Stephen’s Answer

Focus on direct answers.

Prepare for questions that involve "what have you done to improve such and such".

Bring questions to the table about the job you are applying for, interview the interviewer, that always impresses me.

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Peter’s Answer

Its very important to come prepared. Understand the company/mission and the job requirements. Then come prepared with the reasons why you feel you are good fit for the position and tie it to the company's goals if possible. Come prepared with specific examples of how you demonstrated the job requirements and should be more recent experiences. Try not to be nervous as that can turn companies away. So, the more your think ahead of the questions that you may be asked the more relaxed you will be in your responses/behavior.

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Karen’s Answer

I would say that preparation is key! Research the company and learn about their history and mission. Practice/have a mock interview with a family member or friend. Be sure you get a good nights sleep and be prepared.

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Nadia’s Answer

Research the company and learn what the do and what value they add. Thing about how your background, interests and personal goals are aligned with the job requirements and responsibilities. Go in to the interview prepared and confident.

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Redden’s Answer

You should research the company to see if you meet any of the requirements for the job you are applying for. Not all positions require experience and may provide on the job training.

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weixin’s Answer

The first impression counts, hence preparation is key for all interviews. Be equipped with knowledge of the JD, the Company & the Interviewers. Do research about the company eg. vision, mission & business model, as well as the interviewers. Lastly, have several rounds of practice with your friends or family whom you are comfortable. Practise makes perfect!!! On the actual day, be mindful to have ample time for rest and be early for the interview!

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Chris’s Answer

Practice! Don't expect to interview for one job and one opportunity and get it. Just like anything else in life, the more you do something, the better you will be at it. So... seek and go to any job interview you can fit into your schedule. The more you are able to interview, the better you will be able to apply the great advice given in the above responses. Repetition will increase your interpersonal skills, increase your confidence and decrease your fear. Don't ever quit!

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Eric’s Answer

I generally find that most job applications are more intimidating then they really are. Just because my resume does not exactly fit what the job posting is looking for has never held me back from giving it a go. Keep in mind most all entry level jobs will provide the job/company specific training you need to complete the job.

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Lara’s Answer

I'm not sure if you're asking about prior experience related to the job you'd be interviewing for, or prior experience in interviewing. Either way, preparation is important! Find out all you can about the company, even the manager or person you'll be interviewed by. Have a list of questions you would like answers to, and not just benefit-related questions either. Ask what the company culture is like, how long do people stay at that company, what opportunities you would have in the future for advancing your career, etc. If you don't have much work experience, or not in the field the job is in, try to find out what traits are relevant to that new job and describe how you could fulfill that using what experience or schooling you have. And be yourself, try to relax and realize everyone who is interviewing you has been in your shoes. Good luck!

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Genia’s Answer

I would say if you have a job, think about what it is that you do and align those skills with what the job requires. For example, do your research on the company and the role you are applying for. If you currently work in the food service industry, then you probably have customer service skills and relationship management skills. Prepare yourself for the question of what would make you a good candidate for this position. List your skills and make sure you can communicate those effectively to the recruiter/interviewer would be my advice.

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Samantha’s Answer

The important thing is to pull from the skills (ie customer oriented, detail oriented) from what you do, whether in after school activities, part-time jobs, etc. You don't necessarily need job experience to behavioral interview questions.

Think about what motivates you and the things you like to start looking at internships that might point you towards a future career. Before you begin interviewing, be sure to look into the company you're going to interview for. There are many resources on Google and YouTube...don't be afraid to utilize. Come prepared with several questions of your own because you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you so be confident!

Put a focus on extracurricular activities if you do not have past work experience.


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Megan’s Answer

Job experience is sometimes not as important in an interview as much as how you can articulate your past experiences as it relates to the role. No matter what your background is, think of the role that you are interviewing for and the skills that are required for it. Time some time before the interview to think of experiences that you have had that demonstrate those skills. For example, if you are interviewing for a sales role, but don't necessarily have sales experiences, try to draw upon times that you have needed to demonstrate the skills that are needed in sales (influencing, building consensus, overcoming objections.

For additional tips please visit: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/interviewing/how-to-prepare-for-an-interview

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Christopher’s Answer

Before going on an interview, research what the company does through their website. Know your own strengths and why you feel you would be a good fit for the job. Also know your own weaknesses in case they ask what you struggle with. Its okay to be honest. Also, come with questions, whether its about the company, job, what the position looks like on a day-to-day basis. Asking questions shows that you interested and have a desire to learn.

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Niko’s Answer

You need to make sure that understanding of the job requirements, you can get this from the job description when you applied for the job. Also you should have a research for the company. Prepare questions for interview and practice mock interview.

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Sera’s Answer

Preparation is key for any job interview. It is important to research the Company you are interviewing for- understand their values, mission, and what it is that they do. If you are new to interviewing, it may be helpful to do mock interviews with a family member or friend. You can find many popular interview questions via a quick websearch. Be prepared with multiple questions to ask each interviewer - they may answer some of your questions during the interview, so you want to be prepared with plenty of questions! Do your research, dress well, be presentable, and overall, be confident! Sell yourself the best you can. Good luck!

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Barrett’s Answer

That will depend on the type of job you're interviewing for. However, it's always a good idea to educate yourself on the company beforehand. Usually there's an 'About Us' or 'What We Do' section on the company's website where you'll be able to learn more about the company as a whole. It could also be a good resource for finding questions you'd like to ask the interviewer. If you're able to get your Interviewer(s) names before the interview, it's also a good idea to see if you can find more information about their background and interest on LinkedIn.

There's usually more than one qualified candidate during the interview process, and this could be a good way to further separate yourself.

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