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What are some techniques and methods i should follow to get into law school?


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Suddhasattwa’s Answer

Hi Harshpreet,

Quite an aspiring role, impressed!

Well, you certainly need to have a bachelor's degree or have completed 90 credit hours (three years) towards a bachelor's degree, prior to entering a law school.

But if you are under-graduate then you need : Undergraduate degree in Pre-Law Major
Clear your LSAT (Law School Admission Test) to get into any LSAC-member Canadian law school. (should be 12-180 range)
Then you can go to any Law School in Canada
Last stage is complete Your Province’s Bar Admission Course and Articling

All the very best Harshpreet.
Cheers, Suddho

Suddhasattwa recommends the following next steps:

https://www.lsac.org/choosing-law-school/find-law-school/canadian-law-schools
https://www.lawyeredu.org/canada.html

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Dianne’s Answer

Hi Harshpreet,

This is such a great question, and I wish I would have asked it before I attended law school. I went to law school in the U.S., and I'm not sure if there are different requirements from Canadian law school, so just be aware these are steps I would recommend as an American law student (although I imagine it can apply to Canada too!).

Step One: College
You will need a Bachelor's degree before attending law school. I think the most unique and neat thing about law school is that you do not need to have a specific major to get in! Many people think law school candidates should just take Political Science or Criminal Justice, but there is no requirement. I had fellow law school colleagues who studied Philosophy, English, and even Graphic Design. I found that my peers who had other majors aside from Political Science or Criminal Justice had a different way of analyzing things that benefited them and allowed them to thrive in law school. I have also met students who studied Mechanical Engineering or Biology in college. The amazing thing about those people was that it allowed them to have a backup career (if you will) if they later decided not to go to law school. Additionally, in the United States, if you want to become a patent attorney, they require you to have a science degree, so these peers also had that option! I have a friend who was a Registered Nurse before she became an attorney. Once she finished law school, she was able to get a job as a lawyer for a hospital defending medical professionals as a malpractice attorney. She can connect and understand her clients in a way other lawyers can't because of her medical training. I would think of it this way: what kind of career would you like to have if you decided not to go to law school?

Step Two: Study for the LSAT
I would recommend studying and even taking the LSAT during the middle of your junior year in college. This will allow you enough time to go back and retake it if you are unhappy with your score without delaying your law school application process.

Step Three: Apply to law school
If you decide that you want to go to law school immediately after graduating from college, you should consider applying to law school during the first semester of your senior year of college. That way, before you graduate from college, you will know which law school you will attend.

If you have extra time in college, you should see if your school has a pre-law student organization. This is a great way to meet other prospective law students and connect you with lawyers who graduated from your college. But the most important thing about going to law school is earning high marks in your class and obtaining a high LSAT. Anything else you do is bonus points!

I hope this helps! Good luck!!!

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Richard’s Answer

Law schools do not look to see if you have had specific high school courses. However, in order to get into a good college, you might consider taking the hardest degree program available at your school (AP or IB). The IB program would be excellent to get experience in extra writing. You might also take a speech or debate class to see if you enjoy public speaking. There are types of attorneys though who do not have to go to court or have trials. My wife is an attorney, and she thinks all of the writing she did in high school and college were excellent preparation for law school and being an attorney.

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Andrew’s Answer

There is no "designed path" to get into law school. The most important thing is to work hard in college and get good grades. One of the most important pieces of applying to law school is doing well on the LSAT exam. It would be advantageous for you to take an LSAT prep course that provides simulated testing experiences to allow you to work under the same conditions you would face during the real exam. There are many different paths to take when pursuing a legal career and for that reason, there are so many backgrounds you can come from. As long as you have a good work ethic you can explore any path while in college.

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Job’s Answer

You need to get good grades, participate in debate or the school paper. Try to do both to improve your public presentation and writing skills. Take one or two LSAT classes to prepare for the LSAT. If you can write a well organized and logical thesis.

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Job’s Answer

You need to get good grades, participate in debate or the school paper. Try to do both to improve your public presentation and writing skills. Take one or two LSAT classes to prepare for the LSAT. If you can write a well organized and logical thesis.

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Richard’s Answer

Law schools do not look to see if you have had specific high school courses. However, in order to get into a good college, you might consider taking the hardest degree program available at your school (AP or IB). The IB program would be excellent to get experience in extra writing. You might also take a speech or debate class to see if you enjoy public speaking. There are types of attorneys though who do not have to go to court or have trials. My wife is an attorney, and she thinks all of the writing she did in high school and college were excellent preparation for law school and being an attorney.

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Fiona’s Answer

Study hard and get good grades!
Do some volunteering work or extra curricular activities to make yourself stand out.

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