10 answers

How much education should you include in a CV / resume?

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Hi,

I was wondering what the amount of education that should be included in a resume / CV. I was always under the impression that everything should be included, so in my case as a student in the UK, I would include everything from my GCSE's, A-Levels and then my university / college degree. However, I have seen examples where only university / college results are included, to almost make space for other stuff. I am going to be a masters degree as well, so feel like including everything might be a bit too much. What are your thoughts? #college #career #resume #job

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10 answers

Dexter’s Answer

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Hi Polina,

I'd recommend only including college information. Most recruiters aren't looking at highschools or anything like that. If you have any stand-out accomplishments, such as doing well in a state wide competition or what not in highschool, you can list those, though only if relevant to the job you're applying for.

Whenever I see highschool information when reviewing resumes, I just skip over it and do not take it into consideration. To be honest, in the software engineering field, I only really care about what coding projects you've completed, your github profile, etc. If the resume doesn't have much of that information, then I'll look at schooling information, but really by that time, it's probably a candidate that won't make it past the screening.

Wish you the best of luck!

--
Dexter
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Angela D.’s Answer

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Hey there! Good question! First off, resumes are distinct from a CV (Curriculum Vita). Resumes are usually only one or two pages. Use a professional font such as (alphabetized): Arial, Book Antiqua, Calibri, Cambria, Garamond, Georgia, Helvetica, etc. You can include a banner at the top of the first page with your name and a small professional looking photo. Include your contact information either in the header or footer and I would suggest creating a LinkedIn profile and provide that link as well. Because of identity theft and other considerations today, it is more common to include only city/state/zip (no street address). Some sections to include in the body of the resume are: an introduction and/or profile summary which can list the position or field desired; employment (most recent first); academic history (most recent first and include any honors, scholarships, awards, etc.); skill sets (such as communication + any languages other than English, organization, attention to detail, technology/software knowledge, etc.); and extracurriculars/volunteering. I’ve even included a section titled “Career Highlights” on mine.

Be concise in your descriptions. Section headers are more distinctive if you use italics, bolding, and underlining. Bullets in your sections can increase readability, but note that round ones are a bit overused. Instead consider using squares, arrows, dashes, etc. already in MSWord. Lastly, use subdued font colors for emphasis. Navy, evergreen, and chestnut are only some examples.

Note that a CV is more detailed and conforms to your particular industry or academia, usually in a prescribed order. In my case, as a professor, I have a rather long CV that includes the above as well as courses taught, administrative/leadership positions, publications, conference presentations, etc.

Google examples of resumes and CVs on the web. There are also templates as well.

One other thing…the cover letter. This is the key initial document that allows you to present your best self with confidence. The first two paragraphs are crucial. An example of the opening lines of the first

Strive to be as professional as possible in your application and documents, while also highlighting your strengths and what distinguishes you from the crowd. There is only one you! Wishing you the best in your endeavors, Dr. B

P.S. Proofread, proofread, proofread. Ask at least one trusted other to look your materials over. My apologies for this looooonnng response! Just wanted to help….
So glad you clarified resume versus CV. I didn't realize the difference myself until recently! :) Marina Baker
Happy this was helpful! Angela D. Blaver, Ph.D.
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Ashley Ebersberger,’s Answer

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As a Recruiter, my advice would be two fold -
1 - if applying for your first job out of college, I would include high school and year of graduation along with your Bachelors degree. However, after that first job following college, with adding that new professional experience on your resume you can take off your high school degree.
2 - In addition to having you bachelors degree, I would only have you GPA listed, if it is exceptional. No other test scores listed, etc.

Lastly, if you are currently getting your Masters and applying for jobs as well, I would put your Masters degree on and you can list the year you started (2019-present or in process). Anything indicating you are currently pursuing your Masters degree.

Any relevant certifications you have you can list that as well especially if it is relevant to the job you are applying for.
i.e. CFA (chartered financial analyst), etc.

On my resume, I have my Education & Credentials listed together.

I know in the UK resumes are a bit different than in the US, I work at global firm and see both but generally speaking they include the same information.
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Fiona’s Answer

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A CV should generally be short, concise and succinct.
The educational section should be no exception. Clearly state all your qualifications and outstanding grades. This should be sorted from most recent to least recent.
For example: [year], [school name], [degree obtained]
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Vineeth’s Answer

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Very good question. It all depends on your experience and projects you have worked on. If you are applying for a position where you have lots of skills and experience then best way to do is to portray those as projects and less of education. If you are a fresher and needs to try for your first job of its kind then add education based on the Job desc. I still feel you should show your highest qualification and major in the CV.
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Suprit’s Answer

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Hi Polina, having studied A-Levels myself I would suggest you to include all of your relevant education and accomplishments earned from high-school till now, so the recruiters have a complete timeline of your progress. Any extra curricular activity / volunteering job done along with your education will greatly amplify your resume. If you had any time off during these years, I would advise you to properly reason the gap with any activities that were done during that time. This should certainly give recruiters better idea of your background, and if are still interested and have further questions they will certainly reach out. Good luck !
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Claire’s Answer

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Hello Polina!


When it comes to your resume/CV, you want to highlight your highest achievements. With that being said, including only your college education will be a way to showcase your highest education. You may also include the grad program you enroll in and the expected graduation year. Having a tailored resume to the specific job you are applying to will help keep your achievements relevant. Good luck!
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Yana’s Answer

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Hi Polina,
You should not include in your CV all your primary education, for education you should only include your highest level BA or Masters of something, thats about it. What employers are looking for is actually relevant experience, so if you worked part-time during your studies, absolutely include that with the description of what your responsibilities were. If you volunteered - also include that.
You do not want a long resume that only describes your years from kindergarden to UC, nobody needs to read that. If you have a BA or Masters of something, its already assumed that you graduated from school :)
Best of luck
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Chad’s Answer

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The best advise I can give is to tailor your resume / CV to the job for which you are applying. Keep information relevant and a timeline absent of gaps. If you are coming out of education with limited prior work history to share, then it is appropriate to list a full timeline of 5-10 years history.
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Katya’s Answer

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Hi Polina, I would recommend to include your college education- bachelor and master degrees -as they are relevant to the hiring companies. I also would recommend that you include any professional certificates you have earned-especially if they are relevant to the jobs you are interviewing.

For example, if you are a notary-make sure it’s on your resume.

you do want to leave space for your accomplishments;computer skills, past experiences-and have an objection statement on the resume.

I think- depending on how much experience you have-including your high school education is not necessarily-even though often you may find yourself completing an online job application -where specifically your high school education might be asked.

information to include:

1) The name of the school

2) location of the school

3) the degree you earned

4) your field of study

5) graduation year

6) you might or might not include your GPA- I have never included my GPA on my resume

Hope this helps.
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