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When can I start to apply for internships inside the Film Studies field?

This question is because there are many internships for film majors but some of them ask for certain experience or will be admitted once the applicant had completed at least half of its bachelor. Is this the case for every internship or most of them? #film #internship #studies #cinematography #films #cinema #film-studies

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Bob’s Answer

Apply for internships as soon as you can. Of course each company offering an internship with have different requirements and/or pre-requisites for a position, just like you would find with any job. Definitely coordinate with your school to see what programs are offered through them (and give course credit, etc). Also, the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences offers a fantastic college internship program. It's very competitive of course, but it's one of if not the best in the country. The ATAS program brings in a couple of dozen students from colleges around the country, all of whom are following different areas of study and pairs each with a mainstream entertainment company in the Los Angeles area during the summer. Check it out. Best of luck!

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James’s Answer

You can start applying at any time you feel you are ready. As mentioned there are many types of internships in many of the areas of film and television. Some are paid, positions some are not. The job descriptions vary as well. Your previous experience or the amount of education you have in an area will determine the degree and type of internship. But don't wait, most internships are worth your time. You gain knowledge and experience, of which both will give you better opportunities later. You also meet people working in the industry that can possibly be a benefit. Don't expect however, to begin at the top. Internships are often entry level positions, allowing you to get your feet wet. As you gain more experience you can look towards more advanced internships and eventually a permanent job in your career. So don't be afraid to start trying, and don't worry if you start in the mail room, so to speak. James Hout Producer

Thank you comment icon I'd love to start as soon as possible but I am afraid, as a college freshman, I might not be so ready to grasp everything. Mail woman? That's fine with me! Problem is I do not know how to find such position. I'll start a research and see what I can find. I would love to be able to participate in a set before actually being an intern, just taking notes and getting to know how everyone does their job. Any advice for this? Considering this a job based on experience I do not really mind the pay nor the schedules nor the hard work I might get at first, what I really don't want to go through is feeling like I do not know what I am doing or people judging my capabilities based on what am I working for. Thank you so much for your answer, it helped me greatly in many ways. Gabriela
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Mark’s Answer

Hi Gabriela,
The best way to get employed would be to apply for an internship now with a production company. This job would be voluntary. That's right, you won't get paid, but you will meet with the assistants, creative executives, the producers and founders. Once you work hard, most likely you'll get paid as an assistant.
Best wishes.

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Jessica’s Answer

Don't expect any real information from this site. I spent an hour writing a really detailed and very useful reply to a question about the hiring of minorities in the film industry. The Career Village computer code is having problems deciphering words and kept telling me, upon submission, that there were objectionable ones in my response. In fact, there weren't any. Jared Chung, the founder of Career Village, after a complaint that I made, contacted me to apologize for the problem and asked that I re-send what I'd written to not just help to figure out the digital issue, but to allow him to post my reply. I spent another hour doing this- to no avail. I never heard back from him and my advice was not posted. Among other career highlights,bI was the first female photographer at any TV network in the US (specifically, NBC), was, for 20 years, the official Law & Order franchise photographer, served for six years as an elected official on the National Executive Board of the International Cinematographers Guild and was the Yankees' commissioned fine art photographer for the building of the new Yankee Stadium. If my advice doesn't warrant posting, I'm stunned. But, you should be wary.

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