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What does a psychologist do?

I going to be a junior in high school next year, and i a m planning on going into the medical field. I am interested in psychology, however I do not know too much about what exactly they do on a day to day basis, patients they deal with, etc. #psychology #medicine #medical #medicine #doctor #psychiatry


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John’s Answer

GREAT Question Charlotte

1.) PSYCHOLOGY VS. 2.) PSYCHOLOGIST

1.) BACHELORS' DREGEE IN PSYCHOLOGY – provides training in a number of skills which can be applied to many occupations and disciplines. As you search for a job, it would be helpful to make a list of these skills which potential employers may find attractive. For example, throughout your schooling you have most likely done a good deal of academic writing and research. This skill would make you a viable candidate for many positions, such as business manager, library assistant, probation officer, and many others. Take inventory of your strengths, and consider how they might be of value in a range of occupations.

2.) PSYCHOLOGIST REQUIRE A DOCTORAL DEGREE:
• Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs are geared towards those candidates who are interested in research.
• Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D) programs are best suited for the practice of psychology.

Individuals can begin these programs after earning a master's degree or enter directly after undergraduate studies. Students who have already completed a master's program can count some of the credits toward the completion of their doctorate. Most states require that people who run their own practice have a Ph.D. or Psy.D. and some state licensing committees additionally require that applicants hold a degree from an APA-accredited program.


SIX COMMON CAREE PATHS WITH BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN PSYCHOLOGY

The majority of students with a bachelor's degree in psychology go on to work in human or social services. Some typical jobs in this field of work are: career counselor, psychiatric technician, rehabilitation specialist, and case manager. These jobs all require skills which a bachelor's degree in psychology provides, such as the ability to evaluate the needs of a client, to keep accurate and organized records, to express empathy and compassion, and to work towards the best interests of your client.

A bachelor's degree in psychology provides training in a number of skills which can be applied to many occupations and disciplines. As you search for a job, it would be helpful to make a list of these skills which potential employers may find attractive. For example, throughout your schooling you have most likely done a good deal of academic writing and research. This skill would make you a viable candidate for many positions, such as business manager, library assistant, probation officer, and many others. Take inventory of your strengths, and consider how they might be of value in a range of occupations.

1.) CAREER COUNSELOR – Your goal would be to help career oriented students and job seekers discover their potential. Working as a career counselor you'll assist people perform self assessments, find careers, make career changes or in vocational rehabilitation. Not only is being a career counselor fulfilling as a psychology graduate you are uniquely qualified to help individuals in their career discovery process – since some much of career discovery involves self discovery.

2.) CHILD CARE WORKER – After earning your degree in psychology will allow you to work directly in psychology by becoming a partial care worker in a mental health setting such as child care. Childcare workers work in daycare, after-school programs and other child care settings.

3.) PSYCHIATRIC TECHNICIAN – While your undergraduate degree in psychology does not qualify you for a career as a psychologist, it does prepare you to work in the field of mental health and human services. A few job positions available to undergraduate psychology majors include mental health technician, social work assistant and psychiatric technician.

4.) PROBATION & PAROLE OFFICER – Psychology majors are also well qualified to pursue careers in criminal justice. In fact, psychology graduates are well suited for careers as probation and parole officers. Probation and parole officers supervise and work with individuals convicted of crimes. You'll monitor convicts, track behaviors, coordinate with other professionals or therapists, and make recommendations to the courts.

5.) REHABILITATION SPECIALIST – Assist people struggling with physical and mental disabilities reintegrate into society, become self sufficient and live on their own. While this position often requires a master's degree, a bachelor's degree in psychology is also adequate preparation for this career.

6.) SOCIAL SERVICE SPECIALIST – Social service is a hot spot for psychology graduates seeking career opportunities. Professionals with a bachelor's degree in psychology can find jobs in various social service sectors including non-profit organizations and government agencies. You can pursue a career in social service provide community support, direct client counseling and various case management services.

Despite this competitive job market, there are ways to optimize your degree's potential, as well as your own employability. As you work your way through your degree, consider which classes will provide useful skills which you can use to market yourself to employers. Any classes which strengthen your understanding of human behavior and decision-making, your writing and communication skills, and your organizational skills will be of particular value further down the road.

Hope this was Helpful Charlotte

Thank you! This was super helpful and very thorough! Charlotte Y.

Your Welcome Charlotte, It was my Pleasure. Believe you can and you’re halfway there. John Frick

Thank You for your Continued Support Dexter. The only person we are destined to become is the person we decide to be. John Frick

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David’s Answer

Psychologists typically do the following: Conduct scientific studies of behavior and brain function. Observe, interview, and survey individuals. Identify psychological, emotional, behavioral, or organizational issues and diagnose disorders. A normal day for a psychologist may include collecting information (through surveys, interviews, etc.), conducting studies of clients' brain function and behavior, researching, identifying behavioral and emotional patterns in clients, diagnosing disorders, setting treatment plans, making referrals and writing. As well as psychiatrists prescribe medication, psychologists can't. Psychiatrists diagnose illness, manage treatment and provide a range of therapies for complex and serious mental illness.

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Richard’s Answer

After obtaining a PhD in psychology, a psychologist provides counseling for patients. Think of the stereotypical therapist with the patient talking through their troubles and devising coping skills to live a life which won't be controlled or ruined by mental illness.

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Rachel’s Answer

Some of the answers above are very complete. The difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist is vast, and these careers require completely different training paths.

Psychologists focus mainly on therapy and counseling.
Psychiatrists are specialized to provide medications to help with psychiatric illnesses.

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Estelle’s Answer

John's answer is very complete. Many psychology majors get jobs as counselors and social service providers. Psychology is a great foundation for other medical professional degrees. My niece got her psychology degree before applying to medical school. She is now finishing her psychiatry residency and is going to specialize in child psychiatry.

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