19 answers

What career best suits my interests?

18
100% of 14 Pros
Asked Viewed 161 times Translate

I enjoy administrative tasks such as office duties, budgeting, math, and providing explanations. I love to help people wherever and whenever I can. I have been trying to find a career that best suits my interest for years but nothing seems to stick. I will be starting college soon and I would love to have a good idea on what I should major in . Please advise. #college #career #college-major #math #career-counseling

18
100% of 14 Pros

19 answers

John’s Answer

3
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate
Ramsey financial jobs exist at almost every company in almost every industry. There are two ways to find openings—online and offline—and it's a good idea to use both methods. Keep in mind that financial jobs are highly specialized, so generic job boards are not the best places to seek such positions. Your university's alumni association can also be very helpful by putting you in touch with industry insiders who are willing to provide insight and sometimes job leads.

To effectively pursue jobs with the highest probability of success, you must measure the demand for the position. Do the research first to discover your options. The time spent uncovering the most interesting possibilities can be time saved working in a job that just doesn't fit. The financial services industry is multifaceted, offering a variety of positions that cater to different skills and interests, along with sub-industries that encompass niche opportunities. Researching the possibilities in financial services will help you to land the job that has is most compatible with your interests and skills. The same is true for professionals who are seeking a career change and who want to give a new sector a shot.

1.) CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER – Certified financial planners work with individuals to meet short- and long-term financial goals. They understand complex legal and financial documents and are knowledgeable of financial laws and legal restrictions. Certified financial planners also have a good command of investments and security planning, estate planning, tax planning, employee benefits planning and insurance planning. Learning about a client's financial situation is crucial to developing realistic plans so financial planners must interview clients thoroughly, by reviewing fiscal situations and developing tools to assist in meeting financial goals. Financial tools include developing a family budget, tax-sheltered investment plan, retirement savings and a major purchase timeline.
• SALERY OUTLOOK – The average Certified Financial Planner salary in the United States is $65,900 as of May 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $50,900 and $79,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

2.) FINANCIAL REPORTING ANALYST – Financial reporting analysts prepare documentation that reflects a company's financial standing. The information they compile is issued to internal and external sources and is used to create budgets, conduct audits and issue stock. They use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to create financial statements, shareholder reports and balance sheets while ensuring accurate financial reporting throughout an organization by working closely with various departments and management. They analyze income and expenses, reconcile accounts, file regulatory reports, provide information to auditors and issue data used in Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings and annual reports.
• SALERY OUTLOOK – The average Financial Reporting Analyst salary in the United States is $70,900 as of May 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $58,500 and $86,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

3. INVESTMENT CONSULTANT – Some of the most glamorous—and intense—financial careers are jobs in investment banking. Investment banking jobs facilitate new issuance of corporate securities and bring them to market for investors to purchase. Investment banks also trade securities and advise both corporations and wealthy individual investors. Typically, investment banking firms have numerous divisions and groups with different objectives and responsibilities. Working in a traditional investment bank would allow you to interact with issuers of securities, and M&A professionals. You might even work on the trading desk, trading stocks, bonds and other securities in the secondary market. Or, you could become a qualitative research analyst in either stock research, corporate bonds, or other fixed-income securities.
• SALERY OUTLOOK – The average Investment Consultant salary in the United States is $72,500 as of May 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $60,500 and $92,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

4. CHARTERED MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT – Whether chartered or certified, management accountants are responsible for evaluating the financial information of companies and advising them on issues like profitability and risk. These professionals analyze performance objectives, asset ledgers and budgets and report their findings to business leaders so that they can plan the direction of their company or organization. For example, a management accountant may review network infrastructure investments and determine that the company isn't adequately prepared to handle future demands and must allocate more capital to this area. Additionally, these professionals may generate reports for outside groups, such as investors and government auditors.
• SALERY OUTLOOK – The average Chartered Management Accountant IV salary in the United States is $94,000 as of May 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $85,900 and $103,500. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Despite their differences, common characteristics apply to many financial professions. Financial careers tend to be stressful, have high barriers to entry, enjoy lucrative salaries, and be located in major financial centers. They tend to provide challenging work environments, interaction with highly motivated and intelligent colleagues, and stiff competition among applicants. Most of them require a substantial amount of education as well as stellar academic performance. While many people are drawn to the financial field because of the potential for substantial income, those who are the most successful tend to also have a distinct passion for their work.

Hope this was Helpful Ramsey
Thank You Jennifer. “If our hopes of building a better and safer world are to become more than wishful thinking, we will need the engagement of volunteers more than ever.” — Kofi Annan John Frick Translate
Thank you so much! This was very helpful! Ramsey P. Translate
You are welcome Ramsey. It was my Pleasure. Nothing is impossible, the word itself says “I’m possible.” John Frick Translate
3
100% of 2 Pros

Amy’s Answer

3
100% of 3 Pros
Updated Translate
I think you should also look into data science. It's a fairly new field with a lot of growth for the future, especially with the rise of machine learning. You will be able to utilize math and critical thinking skills to analyze data, provide comprehensible visualizations, and compose meaningful reports for companies to review their progress and adjust their strategies.
3
100% of 3 Pros

Amy’s Answer

2
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate
I think you should also look into data science. It's a fairly new field with a lot of growth for the future, especially with the rise of machine learning. You will be able to utilize math and critical thinking skills to analyze data, provide comprehensible visualizations, and compose meaningful reports for companies to review their progress and adjust their strategies.
Thank you so much! Ramsey P. Translate
2
100% of 2 Pros

Ryan’s Answer

2
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate
I first want to commend you and say that knowing what you enjoy, as well as what you do not, is the best way to find a long-term career you can be successful at. The tasks you enjoy all relate to being an analyst, which is a common starting point at many large companies prior to moving into any leadership roles. You would crunch numbers, explain the results, spot trends, and learn detailed information about the company you work for.

A good degree to get that aligns with your strengths is a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration which would have a major in something such as marketing, accounting, finance, MIS or economics. You won't have to know your major when you start as a pre-business student because you figure it out along the way based on the classes you find most interesting. A business degree also has a wide range of usage and if you ask around you will find that a majority of people don't end up doing exactly what their degree is anyway. College is a chance to learn about yourself, to learn what part of the world you can impact in the greatest way with your talents, and to prove that have the drive to accomplish large goals.
Thank you so much! This was very helpful! Ramsey P. Translate
2
100% of 2 Pros

Stone’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate
Hello, this honestly sounds like something you would find at most businesses! I am very like-minded, so I think I have a feel for exactly what kind of work you enjoy doing. First thing is first, I would suggest trying to find a position as an Admin, since their job duties are exactly what you are looking for. There are different ways you can approach this, such as trying to become a secretary which you could do starting out in a doctor's office/medical office, for example. You could also look towards a specialized kind of admin, such as a Financial Planner. If you're looking for entry-level jobs that encompass these skills/duties, you might excel really well in a call center environment. While most positions are entry-level, there are always exceptions, and if you're dedicated enough you can easily learn the phone calls enough in order to get promoted to a position more closely related to admin, including being a supervisor or manager. Some businesses will hire an admin, but only if you have tenure, so that is another thing to look at if you're thinking long-term.

Just in general, if you can get a job with an organization such as Intuit, I believe you would excel greatly, as my job is basically exactly what you're looking for, but again that will depend on department and location, etc.

Another thing you can look at is whether or not you believe college is necessary in order to get the job you want, where you want -- if you don't really have a specific business or organization you want to work with, and you don't have a specific drive to make a lot of money, and you really enjoy admin work, then maybe you can save money by not jumping through the extra educational hoops. If you have a goal that required a degree or that you want to strive to make as much money as possible, then that should reassure yourself that college is where you need to be.
Thank you so much! This was very helpful! Ramsey P. Translate
1
100% of 1 Pros

Ginger’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate
I was thinking the same thing when I read their interests. Data science and analytics is actually REALLY FUN because you get the best of both worlds. It sounds daunting at first, but there is nothing better than digging into data and analyzing it to help businesses with their problems. Parts of it are administrative in some capacities (setting up tracking, pulling reports, etc.), but then you can use her mathematical side to really dig into the data, make comparisons, analyze gaps or changes, etc.
Thank you ! Ramsey P. Translate
1
100% of 1 Pros

Jason Aaron’s Answer

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate
Hello Ramsey, I appreciate that you listed your interests and tasks that you like to do. This is very key, to enjoy what you do, especially when choosing a career. Every job has its benefits and vices that make you cringe, but picking a field where you will get more out of life will give you a long productive career. I started out in school as a Computer Science major. I knew when I would graduate that I would have a 40-70K job waiting for me. However, with Computer programming it was very interpersonal. Long hours in the computer lab, programming software was fine but it felt sheltered. I enjoyed helping people, interacting with others and using my creative freedom to be effective. So at the beginning of my junior year i switched to Marketing. This field fitted me like a glove. I could incorporate all my strengths and use it to be successful. Marketing paved the way for me to get into Business management and Customer Service, which is what i ended up doing for 14+ years. I have now transitioned into the Education field because my heart had led me to this point and I enjoy it so much that I am getting my Master's degree in Special education.
In the education field I am still able to incorporate the same characteristics of my personality and things I love, which is helping people, administrative tasks, and etc. into my career.

I would recommend doing research on becoming a teacher or something in the business industry like Marketing or management. Best of luck to you.
Thank you so much! Ramsey P. Translate
1
100% of 1 Pros

MaryJo’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
It is awesome that you are thinking of how your academic interests and the skills you enjoy applying in the "real world" align--that is a huge first step! College is the time to explore all those things, so don't stress too much about what the perfect major is off the bat. That being said, the role you just described aligns well to operations and project management. As you start classes and begin to understand what it is you enjoy, I would recommend looking for internships that give you the opportunity to explore those kinds of roles, especially in industries you are interested in.
0

naveen’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Based on your question it looks like Bachelor of Science in Business Administration would best suite your interest. Choosing Business Mathematics and statistics as an add on apart from Accounting, Management, Economics and Finance, which would be part of curriculum.
In case you are interested in Sciences, Data Science & Data Analyst is the Latest thing, but a solid foundation will surely take you a long way in your career.
Thank you ! Ramsey P. Translate
0

Chris’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
You may want to pursue something in office management with courses focused on business.
Thank you! Ramsey P. Translate
0

Tamara’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
There are several majors which may meet your interest economics, business administration, accounting, or mathematics. Meeting with a college advisor is also a good way to help narrow down your choices. Remember you do not need to choose your major immediately. Explore your options and find your passion.
Thank you! Ramsey P. Translate
0

naveen’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Based on your question it looks like Bachelor of Science in Business Administration would best suite your interest. Choosing Business Mathematics and statistics as an add on apart from Accounting, Management, Economics and Finance, which would be part of curriculum.
In case you are interested in Sciences, Data Science & Data Analyst is the Latest thing, but a solid foundation will surely take you a long way in your career.
0

Chris’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
You may want to pursue something in office management with courses focused on business.
0

Louis’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Ramsey,

As you are interested in administrative tasks such as office duties, budgeting, math, and providing explanations, I'll advise you can try some course outside first. Just to have a little touch with all different majors such as Finance, Accounting, Business Administrative, Marketing, etc. So you will have more concept about what you will learn in different majors and it will help you a lot on choosing your major in your college. And don't be afraid about choosing a wrong major, it's because your job in the future may not be related with your major at all actually.

Hope this help.

Louis, Matt, Don & Man
0

Maria’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Have you looked into actuarial science? It is not a well known field, but you may find it interesting. It has to do with math, finance, and insurance. You would work for a firm or businesses. Try exploring schools unknown to you to find a degree you like.
For example, The Catholic University of America offers a BS in Mathematical Finance.
You could even try looking into real estate. If you love helping people, you would be helping people find their forever home, using math to determine if a house is in their budget, and would have office duties of managing your potential sales.
The University of Florida has a real estate minor that you can combine with another interest of your choice.
0

Vee’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
Hi Ramsey, Knowing what you love and what you are good at are great first steps. Give yourself the chance to explore different options by volunteering your skills while you take up studies or a job. There are some great financial and analytical careers. To find a good intersection in helping people and using your skills, you can look at being Financial Advisor and consultant type of roles. Or Analysts jobs in a service sector like education, healthcare. Best luck!
0

Krithi’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
I think you can also look at Ops or Chief of staff kind of role where you passion of data , people ,analytics could be potentially used . These roles have lots of opportunities currently
0

Charles’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
The areas that you mention remind me of my considerations for my career. I ended up studying Workforce Education and also got a Master of Business Administration. My strong suit is training development and delivery and like you I enjoy working with people and this gives me an amazing opportunity to do just that. I am a Training Lead for Dell Computer and have travelled and worked with various cultures to deliver training and help with questions about technical programs.

You might take a look at Instructional Design as an area of study. It has given me a niche position and a great opportunity to help and work with people.

I wish you the best.

Chuck B
0

Charles’s Answer

0
Updated Translate
The areas that you mention remind me of my considerations for my career. I ended up studying Workforce Education and also got a Master of Business Administration. My strong suit is training development and delivery and like you I enjoy working with people and this gives me an amazing opportunity to do just that. I am a Training Lead for Dell Computer and have travelled and worked with various cultures to deliver training and help with questions about technical programs.

You might take a look at Instructional Design as an area of study. It has given me a niche position and a great opportunity to help and work with people.

I wish you the best.

Chuck B
0